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Fake ‘Dr. Lip Job’ gets suspended sentence for posing as a physician


Justice Nitya Iyer.


Vancouver Sun

A woman who forged a medical licence so she could buy pharmaceuticals like Botox to then inject into duped customers has been given a 30-day suspended sentence and two years’ probation in B.C. Supreme Court.

Rajdeep Kaur Khakh’s digressions included contempt of court and passing herself off as a doctor so she could inject Botox into facial wrinkles and filler material into lips or other facial areas. Only licensed and trained doctors, dentists, registered nurses (or nurse practitioners) under the supervision of doctors, and naturopaths are allowed to perform such procedures under Health Professions Act regulations and Ministry of Health scopes of practice.

Khakh, who couldn’t be reached for comment, was cited for contempt in March 2018; she signed a consent order at the time prohibiting her from “practising medicine.” But last July, the College of Physicians and Surgeons of B.C. learned Khakh was up to her old tricks administering dermal fillers “numerous times at a location in Vancouver.”

The college has been trying to stop Khakh from posing as a doctor for more than three years but each time the college got promises from her to stop, she would continue to do it. For a time, she marketed her services under the Instagram handle “DrLipJob.” She also marketed herself as Dr. Rajii or Dr. R.K., when she injected customers in their homes, cars and other locations.

Although Khakh avoided jail, college spokeswoman Susan Prins expressed satisfaction with the sentence.

“The college … believes that the judge’s reasons will accomplish the task of getting Ms. Khakh to obey and respect court orders in future, and deter other unlicensed practitioners from engaging in unlawful practice. In her comments, Madame Justice (Nitya) Iyer sent a very serious message to Ms. Khakh about breaching consent orders and emphasized the critical public-protection role that regulators fulfil.”

Last November, the college filed a petition with the court in which it sought to have Khakh fined for contempt and/or jailed. Under the current sentence by Iyer, she will have to serve a 30-day jail term if she breaches any of the terms. Khakh must report to a probation supervisor once a week and must also pay a $5,000 fine. Of that amount, $300 is going to go to a former customer who was a witness for the college.

The college first learned of Khakh in 2015 when pharmaceutical companies informed it that she owed $164,000 for products that were advanced on credit. At the time, Khakh was providing services at a spa in Surrey and using a forged medical licence.

“It is certainly the only instance of forging medical credentials to further one’s unlawful practice that I know of,” said the college’s chief legal counsel, Graeme Keirstead.

According to an affidavit filed in court by the college, the forged licence was found on a photocopier at the Clearbrook public library by an employee who notified the college. The name “Dr. Rajdeep Kaur Khakh” was substituted for the original name on the certificate and the expiry date of the licence had been altered.

“Upon review, the document appeared to be a copy of a genuine, but expired, (licence),” Keirstead said, adding that the identification number on the certificate belonged to a practising physician who was registered with the college.

Khakh had previously told a reporter that she went to medical school at the University of Punjab but failed licensing exams.

The college went to great lengths to investigate Khakh, using a security company multiple times for undercover investigations and also going to the spa with a cease-and-desist letter.

The college pursued another similar case, but in that situation a patient got a serious infection after having surgery with a fake doctor in her home-based clinic. A public health warning was issued.

Patients of Khakh’s have complained about their results, but there don’t appear to be any serious adverse events reported.

The college said this in a statement: “Receiving a medical service such as injections from an unlicensed practitioner is risky and has the potential for complications, including reaction to agents, infections or greater harm due to human error. There is no assurance that the practitioner is competent or qualified to provide treatment or that the material and equipment used are safe.”

Prins said unlicensed individuals aren’t accountable to any regulatory body, “which means the public has nowhere to turn if the service or treatment they receive results in complications. We can’t emphasize enough how important it is for patients to check the credentials of the health practitioner they are planning to see to ensure they are licensed and registered with a health regulatory authority (college), and that they have the necessary credentials to perform the procedure.”

Physician credentials can be verified by looking at the directory on the college’s website at cpsbc.ca.

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