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24May

Councillor wants Vancouver to realize the full potential of its ‘night’ economy | CBC News

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A Vancouver city councillor wants her new motion to unlock the potential of Vancouver’s nighttime economy. 

Coun. Lisa Dominato says cities around the world have started paying attention to their nighttime economies — which include sectors like dining, entertainment, music, concerts and related economic factors including transportation and food and drink costs. 

“There [are] lots of things that can be activated after five o’clock, and contribute in a positive way both to the local economy in terms of jobs … but also to the vibrancy of our city in terms of arts and culture hospitality,” Dominato said.

She says her four-page motion brings together work the city has already done on liquor policy, music strategy and its creative city strategy to create a stronger focus on the night economy. 

The strategy would extend beyond the patrons of Vancouver’s traditional bar scene to young families, children and youth, and students. 

“It also includes nighttime workers,” she said. “We’ve got people working in sectors like health care, policing, first responders as well that are part of our nighttime economy … so after five o’clock you have to think about things like public transportation, public safety, accessibility and what are all the different wraparound pieces that might be basic things like lighting, washrooms.” 

Dominato’s motion goes before council on May 28.


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23May

Dan Fumano: Nighttime economy — Vancouver looks at ‘the other 9 to 5’

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Does “No Fun City” need a “night mayor”?

Should some liquor-serving venues be allowed to limit entrance to only patrons over the age of 25?

What can the city do to promote family-friendly nighttime events for those under age 19?

And, crucially, what would it take for Vancouver to finally get late-night SkyTrain service?

Such questions, and many others, could come in for review if Vancouver council decides next week to proceed with what the city is calling a nighttime economy strategy.

“Despite the city’s support for many aspects of the nighttime economy, Vancouver has gained a reputation for being a ‘No Fun’ City in the minds of many,” states the motion on next week’s council agenda, put forward by NPA Coun. Lisa Dominato.

If approved, Dominato’s motion would direct city staff to work with the Vancouver Economic Commission to develop recommendations for a comprehensive citywide strategy, with the aim of “realizing the economic and other potentials of Vancouver’s nighttime economy.”

Vancouver is already developing other strategies involving the cultural sector, such the Vancouver Music Strategy, for which the city is seeking public input over the coming weeks, and the Creative City Strategy. Recommendations for both of those strategies will be presented to council in September.


Vancouver city councillor Lisa Dominato is behind an initiative looking at maximizing Vancouver’s nighttime economy, including expanded transit services.

Jason Payne /

PNG files

But Dominato wants the city to create a broad, more comprehensive look at promoting the city’s economic and cultural potential after dark, for tourists, locals young and old, and those who work night shifts.

“I think we have some untapped potential here … both in economic terms, with jobs and tax base, but also in terms of the vibrancy of the city, in terms of culture, arts, music, outdoor activations, retail, tourism,” Dominato said. “But if you really want to realize that potential, you have to have a strategy.”

This comes as a growing number of city governments around the world have started to take nightlife and nighttime economies more seriously. A City of Toronto report last month described nighttime as the “new competitive edge for post-industrial cities,” and asked: “What is the City of Toronto doing to advance the other 9 to 5?”

The City of Victoria is already looking for someone, seeking to conduct a “late night economy assessment.”

This month, council in Sydney, Australia, endorsed a plan for its nighttime economy, described by the city as “some of the biggest changes to city planning in a decade.”

Other global cities, including London and Paris, have appointed people to oversee nightlife, positions often colloquially called a “night mayor” or “night liaison.”


Mirik Milan is the ‘night mayor’ of Amsterdam and an expert on the importance of the nighttime economy to a city.

Gerry Kahrmann /

PNG files

Amsterdam’s “night mayor” Mirik Milan visited Vancouver city hall last May. The nighttime economy has its own needs and requirements, he said, and his job is to make sure it isn’t merely an afterthought to what happens during the day. Amsterdam, for example, has allowed some businesses to operate any hours they want, including art galleries and live music venues as well as some nightclubs.

Following Milan’s appearance in Vancouver last May, council voted to support a series of nightlife actions, including directing staff to establish a “nightlife council” combining safety, transportation, economic development and “vibrant street life.”

Since then, the city has participated in a research report, conducted by masters of public policy students at Simon Fraser University, to assess the city’s nightlife economy, explore the city’s needs and help inform the work of a future “nightlife council,” said Lara Honrado, Vancouver’s assistant director of cultural services.

That city-commissioned report from the SFU grad students raises the possibility of a “nighttime liaison,” as someone who could “grasp the workings of nightlife spaces, identify trusted providers, and help provide information to the next generation of cultural operators.”


Granville Entertainment District in downtown Vancouver.

STEPHANIE IP /

PNG

Among the SFU report’s ideas is spreading out closing times in the Granville Entertainment District to more gradually dissipate patrons by letting some businesses, with and without liquor service, to stay open later.

The loss of cultural spaces is a constant challenge for Vancouver’s nightlife scene, which is exacerbated by the pace of development, said Yousif Samarrai, one of five SFU grad students who co-authored the report.

Today, many of Vancouver’s “most culturally interesting” nightlife events are in underground, do-it-yourself venues, Samarrai said, “but the only way they actually set up places is in spaces that are set to be demolished.”

That means, of course, that those underground cultural spaces have a very limited lifespan.

Vancouver is more of a nightlife town today than it was a decade ago, said Nate Sabine, a director of the Hospitality Vancouver Association, which advocates for businesses in the Granville Entertainment District and Davie Village.

“I don’t believe the ‘No Fun City’ tag applies to us anymore. I feel like if you’re bored in this city, then you want to be bored, you’re not looking at all,” Sabine said. “But we need to do better, we need to do more.”

“Our belief is a strong culture drives a strong economy,” Sabine said, citing the Hospitality Vancouver Association’s recent report that the Granville Entertainment District 14 liquor-primary businesses alone generate $43 million in annual revenue and 900 jobs.

The SFU report highlights one particularly long-running complaint of Vancouver’s night owls: “The first and most common transportation barrier identified was a lack of public transit service during late hours.”

The absence of SkyTrain service after venues close was identified as “particularly problematic,” the report notes, especially considering the “unreliability” of local taxis, and Vancouver’s status as North America’s largest city without ride-hailing services.

TransLink has been conducting a feasibility study over the last year, looking at different late-night transit options, including SkyTrain service, said TransLink spokeswoman Jill Drew. That report is expected this summer.

Dominato also hopes to develop the nighttime economy beyond bars and nightclubs. She previously lived in France, where she regularly saw kids out in plazas and parks with their parents late at night. Similarly, she would like to see what else the city can do to promote family-friendly, all-ages nighttime events that aren’t centred around alcohol.

The motion, if approved as written, would direct staff to being work on the nighttime economic strategy in 2020, and present a draft to council by June 2021.

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23May

Abbotsford police say early morning fire deliberately set in occupied home | CBC News

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Abbotsford police are looking for a man in connection with an arson fire at a house in the 22-hundred block of Bedford Place Thursday morning at 3:15 a.m.

Fire investigators say a male suspect backed a mini-van onto the driveway of the home before dousing the vehicle with accelerant and setting it on fire. The flames spread to the garage attached to the home with five people inside.

Sgt. Judy Bird with the Abbotsford police says it’s unclear whether the suspect knew there were people inside sleeping at the time of the attack.

“We are in the preliminary stages of the investigation. We are also working with officers from Abbotsford Fire Rescue Service investigators to collect CCTV from the neighborhood, speak to witnesses, and be able to find out why the family appears to have been targeted and what possibly the motive is.”

Five people managed to escape their house unharmed after an early morning arson fire in the 22-hundred block of Bedford Place Thursday, May 23, 2019. (Kevin MacDonald)

All five victims were able to get out of the house in time but were treated for smoke inhalation. 

Sgt. Bird says none are known to police.

“This family are truly victims”. 

The suspect is described as wearing a hoodie, dark pants and dark shoes and was seen running from the driveway.

Police are asking anyone with information about the attack to contact the Abbotsford Police Department.

 

 


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23May

‘Corporate medicine’ model is wrong approach for urgent care centres: think-tank

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City Centre Urgent Primary Care Centre at 1290 Hornby St. in Vancouver.


Francis Georgian / PNG

Vancouver Coastal Health is being criticized for waving “profit-motivated” corporate partners through the door to manage an urgent and primary care health clinic in downtown Vancouver funded by taxpayers.

The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives says it welcomes the idea of the clinics established by the province — where doctors, nurses and other health professionals work as a team — but says they should be run on a not-for-profit basis with community oversight or governance.

“Unfortunately, there is an alarming development taking place under the watch of Vancouver Coastal Health,” the CCPA says in a report released today that refers to the City Centre Urgent Primary Care Centre at 1290 Hornby St. in downtown Vancouver and a clinic planned for south Vancouver.

Opening such clinics across the province has been a major priority for Health Minister Adrian Dix but the government has not been open about business models and financing structures, so Postmedia and groups like CCPA have had to submit freedom of information requests to get details.

In a fact-checking exercise, Postmedia showed that in February’s throne speech,  the government inflated the numbers of doctors and nurses being hired to work in such clinics. The government’s primary health strategy includes funding for an additional 200 family doctors, 200 nurse practitioners and 50 pharmacists. But they won’t all be working in such centres.

There are eight urgent and primary care centres in B.C. with a variety of business models. Another two — in as-yet undisclosed locations — are expected to open soon.

Documents released to Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, a left-leaning think-tank, show that Coastal Health invited medical corporations to run centres, says Alex Hemingway, a CCPA economist and public policy analyst. The only clinic to open in Vancouver so far was contracted by Coastal Health to an entity called Seymour Health Centre Inc., whose CEO is Sabi Bening

The downtown Vancouver centre operates like other medical offices and walk-in clinics in the sense that services provided to patients are covered by the public health insurance plan. But many family doctors are opting for $250,000 salaries instead of paying overhead and then collecting a medicare fee for each service. The clinics have extended hours, some doctors have emergency training and the model is meant to take the pressure off hospital emergency departments.

It’s also intended that the clinics will assist the many patients who don’t have family doctors to get attached to one. Health outcomes are better when patients have a history and continuity with doctors.

Although the vast majority of doctors’ offices are privately managed by their own corporations, Hemingway said there is plenty of evidence to show that not-for-profit models deliver superior care. Hemingway said doctors’ practices are “small scale” compared to the new models of combined urgent and primary care clinics.

Hemingway said it’s worrying that Seymour Health was contracted by the health authority to run Vancouver’s first urgent care centre. According to the government, the startup costs of the clinic were $1.9 million. City Centre Urgent Primary Care has a taxpayer-funded operating budget of about $3.7 million annually, including salaries, administration and overhead cost. The centre is a partnership of the ministry, Coastal Health, Providence Health Care, the Vancouver Division of Family Practice, Doctors of B.C. and Seymour Health Care.

Hemingway said the health authority is leasing the property from a private owner, “meaning it appears to be using public dollars to enhance a privately owned real estate asset. This is an unwise use of public capital investment dollars, which could be invested in publicly owned assets instead.”

Gavin Wilson, a spokesman for Coastal Health, said the Seymour group has 80 years of experience operating primary health care clinics. The costs and the agreement between Coastal Health and Seymour “are similar to contracts we hold with not-for-profit health service providers.”

Wilson said urgent primary care centres provide same-day care for non-life-threatening problems to people who would otherwise have no other option than to go to an emergency department. They have more services than traditional walk-in clinics since they have diagnostic equipment, such as X-ray and ultrasound machines, and labs and pharmacy services.

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23May

‘We’re not all in gangs, doing drugs and bumming out of school’: Surrey students defend their city | CBC News

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When you spend an entire month back in high school, you hear a lot of stories.

Once the students get comfortable, they have no problem sharing their thoughts about anything and everything.

And the most common topic the students at Surrey’s L.A. Matheson Secondary School wanted to talk about? The unfair reputation that comes with being from Surrey. 

“We are not bad kids,” said Grade 12 student Samantha Czulinski, 18.

“We’re not all in gangs. We’re not all doing drugs and bumming out of school.”

Grade 12 student Samantha Czulinski says people need to work harder to truly understand what happens in Surrey. (Martin Diotte/CBC)

It’s a common sentiment in these hallways, but not just among students.

Like it or not, Surrey has struggled with reputation issues throughout its history. As a suburb which was traditionally lower on the socio-economic scale compared to Vancouver, stigmas have always been attached to the city and its residents.  

Struggles with gang violence has also exacerbated the perception and reputation of the city, but students here say it’s high time those misguided ideas are put to rest. 

Living and working in Surrey allows Matheson teacher Annie Ohana to see first-hand the impact the reputation has on her students.

Some students say they feel that coming from Surrey negatively impacts how they’re viewed. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

“We all walk with a chip on our shoulders,” said Ohana, who teaches social justice.

“From a very young age, kids are very well aware that somehow our city is maligned.”

Ohana is concerned that sometimes students subconsciously parrot that narrative.

“If all someone does is point you out as negative or say you have a problem, that’s internalized and then often becomes a behaviour,” she said. 

“You think I’m bad? Well then I’ll show you I’m bad.”

Annie Ohana lives and works in Surrey and says she sees the impact of the city’s reputation on her students. (Martin Diotte/CBC)

Stereotypes and stigma

Grade 12 student Kunwar Sandhu has lived in Surrey for most of his life, and said he often feels the stigma is felt deepest when Surrey students are compared to those who live elsewhere. 

Sandhu, 18, recalled one law field trip that brought together students from different schools in the region. 

“All the kids from our class were coming up with creative questions,” he said. Meanwhile, students from other schools weren’t nearly as engaged, yet the Matheson students felt looked down on.

“We’re not worse than these kids, but we’re viewed as worse than these kids.That’s not fair at all.”

Kunwar Sandhu, who is in Grade 12, has lived in Surrey for most of his life. (Martin Diotte/CBC)

Sandhu is not the only one who’s felt the stigma in his family. 

“My brother got a full ride scholarship into UBC but he’s still viewed as thuggish because he comes from Surrey. It happens to most people who are here,” he said. 

“It’s crazy how people can go ‘Oh you’re from here? You look like this, you must act like this.'”

The hallways at Matheson are monitored during class. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

Stigma in the hallways

The students say the stigma doesn’t just come from outside Surrey — it shows up in their hallways and classrooms, too. 

The Surrey School District has a program called Safe Schools that operate across the city. Trained liaisons monitor the halls during class to ensure students are safe and to look out for any suspicious activities.

Some students at Matheson point to this as an example of how their reputation as Surrey students has an impact on the way they’re treated. They say the feel that hallway monitors are policing them throughout the day. 

“If I’m outside of the classroom for two minutes, going to the washroom, I feel like it’s so unnecessary to attack every student who walks through the hall [during class],” said Grade 11 student Jasmeen Saini.

“We’re not rats infesting the school.”

Surrey’s school district is one of the fastest growing in the region. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

Growing city offers means the chance for renewed reputation

Surrey is the second-largest city in B.C., with 800 new residents moving in each month, and its school district is one of the fastest growing in the region.  

That’s having an impact on how Surrey is seen, according to Matheson principal Peter Johnston.

“The perception of Surrey and LA Matheson is slowly changing in the minds of people who end up coming out here,” Johnston said.

“They realize we aren’t a small and rural town anymore and our facilities and school districts are second to none.”

L.A. Matheson is located in inner-city Surrey. (Evan MItsui/CBC)

But for that perception to continue changing, it’s also up to the students. 

“It’s part of our responsibility to get these students ready for the modern world to help change that narrative,” Johnston said.

“The students have to take some responsibility for that too.”

For students like Sandhu, they have a clear message to the rest of B.C. about Surrey’s reputation: 

“Just because I’m from somewhere else, you think you’re better than me? It’s just not cool.”  

This story is part of a series called Matheson, examining the lives of students at L.A. Matheson Secondary School in Surrey, B.C. CBC journalist Jason D’Souza was given unparalleled access as he spent a month embedded at the high school in order to hear unfiltered stories of students today.


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22May

Nix the noise: WorkSafeBC worried about hearing loss for service industry workers | CBC News

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Exposure to continuous loud noise at work can cause permanent hearing loss and WorkSafeBC is telling service industry employees to beware.

Dan Strand, director of prevention services at WorkSafeBC, says noise levels above 85 decibels during an eight-hour shift can cause hearing damage and the levels in nightclubs and bars are often higher. According to Strand, employers are required to have a noise control program in place if volume in the workplace is a health risk.

Strand says WorkSafeBC officers routinely find noise levels in clubs, pubs and cafes between 90 to 95 decibels. He told CBC’s On The Island guest host Megan Thomas there’s an easy way to test whether the environment is above 85 decibels: If you have to raise your voice into a “sort of yelling mode” to communicate with someone a metre away, it’s too loud.

‘Once it’s gone, it’s gone’

WorkSafeBC wants employees and their bosses to be aware of the risk and has created a new safety bulletin to help them take action.

The bulletin has tips for employers on how to reduce noise, such as using plastic containers instead of metal for dropping off dirty dishes. It is also recommended that staff rotate during shifts so that no employee is continuously positioned where the noise is loudest.

 

To protect themselves, WorkSafeBC suggests employees wear hearing protection and get a baseline hearing test withing six months of working in a loud bar or club.

“You do not want to see degradation of hearing. Once it’s gone, it’s gone and it doesn’t come back,” said Strand.

Jeff Guignard, executive director of the Alliance of Beverage Licensees, said WorkSafeBC’s focus on educating employers about the health impact of noise has been positive because many don’t know it’s a hazard.

Guignard said there are hearing protection devices that employees can wear that will cancel out background noise, but still allow them to hear customers who are speaking to them.

Between 2008 and 2017, WorkSafeBC accepted 3,343 disability claims for noise-induced hearing loss in B.C.




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21May

Gridlock, frayed tempers common as people flock to Deep Cove’s popular Quarry Rock trail

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District of North Vancouver rangers are limiting hikers on the overcrowded Quarry Rock trail to 70 at a time. Photo: Francis Georgian/Postmedia


Francis Georgian / PNG

Strict parking and hiking restrictions introduced last year in Deep Cove brought a measure of relief to the village’s traffic-weary locals, but the recreational hot spot is far from the only one in Metro Vancouver under severe pressure from an increased numbers of visitors.

Planners and politicians like John McEwen, the mayor of Anmore and the head of Metro Vancouver regional parks, say the region is in need of more parks to serve residents and tourists — and more transit buses to haul them there — if there is any hope to smoothly satisfy demand for access to the outdoors.

“Careful what you wish for, but these parks are so amazing and the population growth has been so crazy,” McEwen said. “People want to get out into our parks and it’s really causing some challenges.”

McEwen said recreational areas around his village, like Belcarra Regional Park, “are at capacity at 9:30 a.m. on a beautiful day. … We now have signs alerting people several miles back on connecting roads saying the park is closed, don’t even come up here.”

McEwen wants the region to buy more land for parks, particularly in areas with rapidly increasing densities. And Metro Vancouver must continue talks with TransLink about expanding its service into recreational areas, he added.

“We don’t want to discourage people (from) coming out to the parks. The key thing we need to work on is accessibility through transit.”


Hikers are silhouetted against a foggy backdrop as they look over Deep Cove from Quarry Rock in North Vancouver.

JONATHAN HAYWARD /

THE CANADIAN PRESS

In the case of Deep Cove’s popular Quarry Rock trail, district staff say it was never intended to be more than a local community resource. But traffic to reach the path is causing gridlock, frayed tempers, and bad driving.

Last year’s rule changes limited parking in a dedicated village lot to just three hours — not a lot of time for those intending to hike the popular trail then enjoy a bite to eat. This summer, longer duration parking is available in an overflow lot from July 8 to Aug. 25, and it was also available last weekend. Street parking is for short stops and it’s in high demand. Meanwhile, large tour buses that flout a stopping or parking ban on neighbourhood streets in Deep Cove risk a $500 fine, according to the district.

Those who do find a parking spot may also find they need to wait at the trailhead for a chance to start their hike. The district has limited the number of people at the Quarry Rock viewpoint to 70 at a time, and park rangers have taken to counting heads to limit access to the area on busy days, according to the district.

Steve Ono, the district’s acting general manager of engineering, parks and facilities, attributed some of the village’s rapid rise in popularity with tourists to actress Kate Winslet’s apparent love for Cove eatery Honey Doughnuts. Winslet has in the past tweeted her affection for the doughnuts and has been spotted in a shirt from the shop. That star support, coupled with the crushing popularity of the Quarry Rock viewpoint as background scenery for dating profile pics and Instagram posts, caused traffic in the area to skyrocket the last few years.


District of North Vancouver rangers are limiting hikers on the overcrowded Quarry Rock trail to 70 at a time. Photo: Francis Georgian/Postmedia

Francis Georgian /

PNG

Local residents seem to be largely appreciative of the efforts the district has made, Ono said. “I think probably a lot of residents would rather see us be more restrictive rather than less,” he said.

District staff have acknowledged that parking in Deep Cove can be time consuming and frustrating and, despite the changes, they advised people against driving to the area on several days last year.

Lynn Canyon Park, another popular district recreation area in the district, had similar restrictions go into effect last year.

Through the summer staff asked visitors to consider going somewhere else to give the park and its neighbours a break. In August, staff advised in a tweet: “Don’t waste half your visit viewing the park through your windshield while you wait for parking. Consider coming by bike or public transit.”

Other areas overrun by visitors include spots like Lynn Headwaters Regional Park, Mount Seymour and “probably the whole Sea to Sky corridor,” Ono said.

He said the idea of introducing pay parking for parks — like that in effect at the base of the Grouse Grind — has come up in the past “and it will probably come up again. It’s another tool in the tool box.”

Alistair Knox, the owner of Arms Reach Bistro in Deep Cove, said he was against the parking restrictions when they were first proposed, but he found business to be about the same after the rules went in. He figured it may take a few seasons to determine whether the restrictions had any effect. The weather seemed to be the biggest determinant of visits to his restaurant, he said.

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21May

Workers in noisy clubs should be wearing earplugs, WorkSafeBC says

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Meagan Gill, CTV News Vancouver


Published Tuesday, May 21, 2019 1:16PM PDT


Last Updated Tuesday, May 21, 2019 2:10PM PDT

WorkSafeBC has released a new safety bulletin with noise control regulations for workers in the service industry.

The safety organization says many people working as servers and bartenders are reluctant to use hearing protection devices because they believe it will make it difficult to communicate with customers. 

“Studies show that when noise levels reach 90 decibels or higher, hearing protection actually improves your ability to hear speech,” said Dan Strand, WorkSafe BC’s director of prevention services. “We need to change how we think about hearing protection in the service industry.”

Repeated exposure to noise levels above 85 decibels can cause permanent hearing loss in unprotected people. But studies by WorkSafeBC show that many pubs and nightclubs in B.C. exceed that level during a regular shift.

If noise exceeds the 85 decibel limit within an eight-hour shift, employers are required by regulation to have a noise control and hearing conservation program.

Between 2008 and 2017, WorkSafeBC accepted 3,343 disability claims for noise-induced hearing loss in the province.

“Noise is a serious and widespread problem in many workplaces, and this includes the service industry,” said Strand. “Our research has found that most service sector workers and employers are not aware of the risk of hearing loss in their industry.”

The safety guidelines urge workers to find hearing protection tools that work best for them and to get annual hearing tests. In addition, WorkSafeBC is also now providing employees in the service industry with several online resources to better raise awareness on noise-induced hearing loss.


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21May

WorkSafeBC imposes new guidelines to prevent hearing loss among service industry workers

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Meagan Gill, CTV News Vancouver


Published Tuesday, May 21, 2019 1:16PM PDT


Last Updated Tuesday, May 21, 2019 1:21PM PDT

WorkSafeBC has released a new safety bulletin with noise control regulations for workers in the service industry.

The safety organization says many people working as servers and bartenders are reluctant to use hearing protection devices because they believe it will make it difficult to communicate with customers. 

“Studies show that when noise levels reach 90 decibels or higher, hearing protection actually improves your ability to hear speech,” said Dan Strand, WorkSafe BC’s director of prevention services. “We need to change how we think about hearing protection in the service industry.”

Repeated exposure to noise levels above 85 decibels can cause permanent hearing loss in unprotected people. But studies by WorkSafeBC show that many pubs and nightclubs in B.C. exceed that level during a regular shift.

If noise exceeds the 85 decibel limit within an eight-hour shift, employers are now required by regulation to have a noise control and hearing conservation program.

Between 2008 and 2017, WorkSafeBC accepted 3,343 disability claims for noise-induced hearing loss in the province.

“Noise is a serious and widespread problem in many workplaces, and this includes the service industry,” said Strand. “Our research has found that most service sector workers and employers are not aware of the risk of hearing loss in their industry.”

The new safety guidelines urge workers to find hearing protection tools that work best for them and to get annual hearing tests. In addition, WorkSafeBC is also providing employees in the service industry with several online resources to better raise awareness on noise-induced hearing loss.


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19May

Brazen bike theft caught on camera in Victoria

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CTV News Vancouver


Published Sunday, May 19, 2019 6:22PM PDT


Last Updated Sunday, May 19, 2019 6:44PM PDT

The staff of a Victoria bicycle shop posted some surprising security camera video on its Facebook page Friday afternoon.

In the video, a man can be seen apparently browsing the selection at Giant Bicycles Victoria. He waits for staff to leave the room, before casually grabbing a bike and walking out the front door.

A few seconds later, a store employee comes back into the picture and makes his way out the door as well. That employee – manager Dylan Phye – told CTV News he was able to get the stolen bike back.

“I ran up the street, grabbed the bike from him, exchanged a few choice words, and then came back,” Phye said.

The bike that almost got away was worth more than $1,100.

Giant Bicycles called Victoria police to report the incident. Police say the suspect also made off with stolen goods from a nearby Eddie Bauer store. He is facing charges.

Phye said the shop decided to post the security video to its Facebook page as a reminder to other local businesses.

“We did it to alert other businesses in Victoria,” he said. “It can happen to anybody and happen that quick, so you’ve always got to stay on the ball.”

Phye also hopes the video will serve as a deterrent to other would-be bike thieves.

“We do have great cameras, you know?” He said. “We are always alert, so don’t try anything with us because we will catch you or we will find you.”


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