LOADING...

Category "Festivals"

4Oct

Town Talk: Britain’s Red Arrows fly over Coal Harbour

by admin

https://vancouversun.com/


Portrayed with a Red Arrows aerobatics team’s poster, British High Commissioner Susan le Jeune d’Allegeerschecque, Consul General Nicole Davison and guests had just seen the real Royal Air Force jets fly past them.


PNG

STRAIGHT ARROWS: A key factor in aerial combat — literally a matter of life and death — is to be in exactly the right place at exactly the right time. Having the sun behind you helps, too. Full marks, therefore, to the Royal Air Force’s Red Arrows aerobatics team that was scheduled for a Coal Harbour flypast at 1700 hours recently. With the declining sun glistening on their red-white-and-blue tail fins, the team’s BAE Hawk trainer jets skimmed over at 5 on the dot. As they banked and climbed away, workhorse aircraft — de Havilland Beaver and Otter float planes — resumed their everyday takeoffs and landings.


Vancouver Chief Constable Adam Palmer, Mayor Kennedy Stewart and others saw the RAF Red Arrows aerobatics team’s jets speed over Coal Harbour.

PNG

Vancouver Mayor Kennedy Stewart, Chief Constable Adam Palmer, Bard on The Beach artistic director Christopher Gaze and others watched the proceedings from the Pan Pacific hotel’s eighth-floor deck. They were guests of British High Commissioner to Canada, Susan le Jeune d’Allegeerschecque, formerly ambassador to Austria, and Vancouver-based consul-general Nicole Davison. “The Red Arrows are the best ambassador our country has,” said le Jeune d’Allegeerschecque, whose married name is more common in Brussels than London. As those two cities duke it out over Brexit, the fast-flying Red Arrows might remind Gaze and especially British Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Hamlet’s “slings and arrows of outrageous fortune.” Ditto for that soliloquy’s humbling conclusion: “And thus the native hue of resolution is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought.”


Vancouver International Film Festival executive director Jacqueline Dupuis welcomed Guest of Honour director Atom Egoyan to the 38th running.

PNG

HAPPY ENDING: Cultural organization heads sometimes roll amid a blizzard of finger-pointing, trustee bickering and other nastiness. Not at the Vancouver International Film Festival where eight-year executive director Jacqueline Dupuis announced in July that she’ll leave at year’s end. Looking as relaxed and, dare one say, glamorous as in 2011, Dupuis launched the 38th annual festival by escorting director Atom Egoyan to a screening of his Guest of Honour feature film and to a gala later. Although called “a masterful piece of subtly sophisticated filmmaking” in the VIFF program, showbiz bible Variety deemed the Egypt-born Torontonian’s picture “hopelessly muddled … overplotted and under-reasoned, hysterical and stiffly earnest.”

CONSONANTAL DRIFT: If asked to define modern-day political equivocation, habitual phrase-tangler William Spooner might have replied with a self-defence tip: “Trust in judo.” Then again, his spoonerism of voters’ “elementary affluence” would entail a mere vowel movement.


Dr. Peter AIDS Foundation executive director Scott Elliott and chair Joy Jennissen reported the 16th multi-chef Passions gala raising a record $220,000.

PNG

MORE AID: Dr. Peter Jepson-Young succumbed to HIV/AIDS in 1992 at age 35. CBC-TV’s weekly Dr. Peter Diaries detailed his then-almost-inevitable approach to death. Founded that year, the Dr. Peter AIDS Centre and related foundation began caring for those still living. A decade later, Nathan Fong recruited fellow chefs to launch the annual Passions gala that reportedly raised a record $220,000 recently. Executive director Scott Elliott said the centre now helps clients deal with hepatitis C and supports older ones “isolated and not participating in health care.” It will soon offer twice-weekly programs for female HIV/AIDS patients, he said.


David Robertson compiled his second cookbook, Gather, to mark the 10th anniversary of the Dirty Apron cooking school he and wife Sara founded.

PNG

DIRTY DISHES: Wearing a whistle-clean apron, Dirty Apron co-founder David Robertson marked the cooking school’s 10th anniversary by launching his second cookbook, Gather. Some of the 100,000 folk he’s reportedly taught filled the Beatty Street joint to buy the book and sample such dishes as sake-braised pork belly, seafood and chorizo belly and Robertson’s sensational Thai-style coconut-lemon grass braised beef short ribs.


Maggie Sung had Taiwan Tourism Bureau director Linda Lin visit from San Francisco to inaugurate her as head of a new information centre here.

PNG

TAIPEI TIES: There were complaints when electioneering defence minister Harjit Sajjan attended a recent gala honouring China. Not so when San Francisco-based Taiwan Tourism Bureau director Linda Lin inaugurated Maggie Sung to head our town’s new information centre for the island China claims to own. The ceremony followed Vancouver’s recent 100-event TaiwanFest that began celebrating Taiwanese culture in 1991.


Kyle Parent made the $2,100 quilt and designer Kate Duncan the $30,000 walnut bed to exhibit at the fifth annual Address show she staged.

PNG

BED BUDS: As the huge IDS design exhibition ran downtown, furniture designer-manufacturer Kate Duncan and curator Amber Kingsnorth staged their own fifth annual show titled Address. It occupied five-times-larger premises at Malkin Street’s Eastside Studios. As well as mature and emerging exhibitors from Pacific Northwest states and Alberta, the event welcomed newcomers from Saskatoon, Toronto and Texas. Port Alberni-raised Duncan exhibited a solid walnut bed and side tables tagged at $30,000. Calgary native Kyle Parent added a $2,100 bedspread from his ktwpquilts.com concern.


Designers Madeleine Sloback and Annaliesse Kelly exhibited artworks by Miriam Aroeste and Sandra Lowe in their East Vancouver studio/office.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

GO EAST, YOUNG WOMAN: Vancouver’s creative activities are enhanced — some say dominated — east of Main Street. The 23rd annual Eastside Culture Crawl alone will include 500 artists, artisans and designers Nov. 14-17. The latter include interior designers Annaliesse Kelly and Madeleine Sloback who, although business competitors, share chic Pender Street premises. They mount thrice-yearly exhibitions there, most recently by Mexican-born painter Miriam Aroeste and Okanagan-raised photographic artist Sandra Lowe.


Paisley Smith wore spilling-pipeline headgear alongside Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun whose paintings she animated for her Unceded Territories film.

PNG

TOP HAT: California-based Canadian Paisley Smith wore a simulated oil-pipeline helmet to promote her “immersive” VIFF film, Unceded Territories. Screening in a Vancity Theatre kiosk to Oct. 2, it addresses climate change and Indigenous civil rights with animated interpretations of works by Cowichan/ Syilx artist Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun whose usual headgear is a four-feathered straw fedora.

DOWN PARRYSCOPE: Crown yourself inventively for Mad Hatter Day Oct. 6.

[email protected]
604-929-8456

6Sep

Town Talk: Netherlands dance troupe lures Ballet B.C.’s Emily Molnar

by admin

GOING DUTCH: Last year, Netherlands native Otto Tausk succeeded British-born Bramwell Tovey as Vancouver Symphony Orchestra’s music director. Then, as what the Dutch might call tit voor tat, Nederlands Dans Theater snagged Regina-born Ballet B.C.’s artistic director, Emily Molnar, to lead its 27- and 18-dancer companies. Former Ballet B.C. dancer Molnar has steered the once-moribund company through a decade of break-even-or-better seasons to critical acclaim here and on national and international tours. Addressing dancers, staff, board members and supporters recently, she said: “What we have done together is remarkable.” Then, to rueful smiles all around, “It doesn’t happen easily.” Encouragingly, though, dancers “now have more opportunities to stay at home with full-time or almost full-time work.”

MORE GLOBALISM: Finland native Kari Turunen has succeeded Vancouver Chamber Choir’s Illinois-born founder and 47-year artistic director, Jon Washburn.


Thomas and Amy Fung’s annual garden party and singalong drew corporate, cultural and political guests as well as UBC and SFU’s presidents.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

SCHOOLS IN: Fairchild Group chairman Thomas Fung and actress-wife Amy usually draw business, professional, political and cultural guests to their annual garden party. This year, with son Joseph having founded the Fairchild Junior Academy in Hong Kong, local educational-facility top brass shared the lawn. They were University of B.C. and Simon Fraser University presidents Santa Ono and Andrew Petter, St. George’s Senior School headmaster Tom Matthews, York House school head Julie Rousseau, and West Point Grey Junior School head Ciara Corcoran. An after-supper singalong fronted by host-guitarist Fung could have been, but wasn’t, conducted by UBC grad Ken Hsieh. Edmonton-born Hsieh founded the Vancouver Metropolitan Orchestra in 2003 and has been music director ever since with no successor even contemplated.


The Fungs’ garden party saw UBC president Santa Ono chat with grad, global conductor and Vancouver Metropolitan Orchestra music director Ken Hsieh.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

THE YOGI BERA AWARD: Goes to industrial safety trainer Chris Samson for his August quote: “I’m all for taking risks, so long as it’s done safely.” B.C. transportation minister Claire Trevena is runner-up for: “I think it’s very good to have a regulated market in the way that we have a regulated market.”


After baby daughter Hadley died in 2018, Nicole and Ryan Stark returned to Ronald McDonald House for the birth of Soren, Clara and Sawyer.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

THEY’RE LOVIN’ ’EM: Ryan and Nicole Stark were heartbroken in May, 2018, when four-month-old daughter Hadley died. So were staff at 73-bedroom Ronald McDonald House where the Fort St. John family lived while B.C. Children’s Hospital staff fought to save Hadley. Spirits soared this July when three-month resident Nicole delivered daughter Clara along with sons Sawyer and Soren. “Families want normalcy,” said CEO Richard Pass while welcoming the triplets at an RMH donor reception. “That means more stay-together programs for whole families.” The record stay there is 497 days.

BEEP: Phone messages for classic-car minder Vern Bethel are answered promptly. Ones for daughter Pamela can end up on stage. Umpteen 1990s calls to and responses from then-teenaged Bethel constitute her lauded 2017 show, After The Beep, playing the Vancouver Fringe Festival’s The Nest theatre to Sept. 14. Those dialing 250-885-1285 might even hear themselves in a sequel.


Nina Bentil attended husband and Mile’s End Motors dealer David’s hospitality pavilion and show at Hastings Racecourse’s annual Deighton Cup day.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

THEY’RE ON: Whatever their luck with horse-race bets, Deighton Cup organizers Dax Droski, Jordan Kalman and Tyson Villeneuve sure pick winning weather. Sunshine bathed Hastings Racecourse when their 11th annual event’s record crowd of nattily attired younger folk enjoyed music, food, champagne, cigars and even some betting. Mile’s End Motors dealer David Bentil’s usual pavilion and tree-shaded compound had guests loll alongside such exotic jalopies as a 2017 Ferrari F12 TDF worth $1.5 million. Quite a change from the vacuum cleaners Bentil sold door-to-door along and near his native East London’s Mile End Road.


Late Vancouver Sun veteran Alex MacGillivray’s daughter Caroline founded and heads BeautyNight that helps marginalized women seek success.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

R.I.P.: Former Sun editor-restaurant reviewer Alex MacGillivray died recently — no funeral by request — but his name lives on via actress-daughter Caroline who founded non-profit BeautyNight (beautynight.org) in 2000 and has helped endless marginalized women gain confidence, integration and contact-making skills.


Fung party guest Dr. John Yee, who undertakes more than 60 double-lung transplants annually, lamented Eva Markvoort’s 2010 death to cystic fibrosis.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

BREATH OF LIFE: Guest John Yee wasn’t whisked away from the Fungs’ party to perform another of the 60 double-lung-transplant surgeries he’s undertaken yearly on six hours’ notice. The Sun’s Pamela Fayerman reported that Vancouver General Hospital’s new vivo lung perfusion process allows more precious time to assess donor organs. Dr. Yee still laments cystic-fibrosis patient Eva Markvoort who, despite such surgery, succumbed at age 23 in 2010. Philip Lyall and Nimisha Mukerji’s documentary about Markvoort, 65 RedRoses (that’s how many youngsters pronounce “cystic fibrosis”), will screen at a Vancouver Playhouse gala Sept. 8 to help fund CF research and encourage organ donation.


From left, Nimisha Mukerji and Philip Lyall’s 65 RedRoses film about the late Eva Markvoort will have a gala screening Sept. 8 to help fund cystic fibrosis research. This is a 2008 photo. Markvoort died in 2010.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


Chambar co-owner Nico Schuermans and chef Tia Kambas backed student Jade Sarmiento at an all-female-chef dinner to help fund scholarships.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

HAPPY FIFTEENTH: To the Belgian-themed Chambar Restaurant Karri and Nico Schuermans opened on Beatty Street and moved next door in 2014. Also to seafood-themed Coast, which Glowbal Restaurant Group president-CEO Emad Yacoub located in Yaletown and upmarketed to Alberni Street in 2009. Chambar recently staged a dinner by five female chefs and same-gender Vancouver Community College students to help fund scholarships. Its anniversary highlight will be an all-invited block party’s pig roast and waffle fest on Sept. 8.


Chambar co-principal Karri Schuermans will host the Belgian-themed restaurant’s 15th-anniversary block party, pig roast and waffle fest Sept. 8.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

DOWN PARRYSCOPE: Late French president Charles de Gaulle, whose vetoes made petitioning Britons wait 12 years to join what is now the European Union, might relish their current opera bouffe to get out.

[email protected]
604-929-8456

7Jun

B.C. Summer Festival Guide: 80+ events happening around Metro Vancouver

by admin

Summer festival season is back, so grab your calendar and get ready to plan some summer fun. Our list of more than 80 festivals happening around Metro Vancouver is sure to keep you busy.

READ MORE:Stuart Derdeyn’s Top 5 festivals to check out this summer.


Bard on the Beach Festival
This annual celebration of The Bard is back, celebrating 30 years with four productions on two stages, plus a host of special events. This years shows include: The Taming of the Shrew, until Sept. 21: The 2007 ‘spaghetti western’ version of show – one of Bard’s most beloved productions – is the inspiration behind this hilarious Wild-West love story, where two fierce kindred spirits finally meet their match in each other. • Shakespeare in Love, June 12-Sept. 18: Young Will Shakespeare has writer’s block. The deadline for his new play is looming and he’s in desperate need of inspiration. And then he finds his muse – Viola. She’s Will’s greatest admirer and will stop at nothing (including breaking the law) to appear in his next play. Will’s love for Viola quickly blossoms but their road to romance runs into plenty of speed bumps.  • All’s Well That Ends Well, June 26-Aug. 11: This new, bold staging is set in India during the waning days of British occupation and the cusp of Indian independence. Helena, a privileged young Indian woman, secretly loves Bertram, an officer in the British Army. Cultural, social and political barriers stand between them. But Helena doesn’t give up, and her journey takes her into the heart of her own culture and identity.  • Coriolanus, Aug. 21-Sept 15: Political warfare – and war within a family – drive Shakespeare’s compelling story of the ruthless fighter, Coriolanus, as she fights for honour without compromise. The themes of pride and arrogance are at its core, as Coriolanus examines what it means to be loyal to a parent, to a leader and to a country. • Bard Village, Vanier Park • 604-739-0559, bardonthebeach.org


Charlie Gallant and Ghazal Azarbad in the Bard on the Beach production, Shakespeare in Love.

PNG

Fraser Valley Children’s Festival: Fairy Tales
Bring out your fairy’s, dragons and fairy tale characters for the 23rd Annual Children’s Festival with arts and crafts, music workshops, entertainment and much more for the young and young at heart. • Fraser River Heritage Park, Mission • June 9, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. • Free admission, mission.ca

Italian Day on The Drive
A vibrant cultural street festival celebrating Italian culture, heritage and community. The Drive comes alive in green, white and red with piazza-style animated zones, live music, food vendors, patios, lifestyle attractions, fun family activities and more. • Commercial Drive, June 9, noon-8 p.m. • Free, italianday.ca/


Diane Garceau and Lindsey Shepek, on stilts, entertain people enjoying Italian Day on Commercial Drive.

Arlen Redekop /

PNG

5X
A South Asian millennial festival showcasing the best of music, art, film and fashion. This multi-day, multi-genre event celebrates creativity through art, fashion, live music, club nights, film, and a block party, plus a conference to build connections and capacity in our communities. • June 12-16, 5xfest.com

2019 Festival d’été francophone de Vancouver
One of Western Canada’s biggest celebrations of Francophone music and culture. • June 13-23lecentreculturel.com

88th B.C. Highland Games & Scottish Festival
Wear your kilts, plaids and tartans and enjoy two days of piping, live Celtic music, free entertainment, competitions, kid’s activities, a whisky school, vendors, food, massed pipe bands and a few surprises. • Lafarge Lake Park, 1290 Pinetree Way, Coquitlam • June 14 and 15 • $15, bchighlandgames.com

20th Annual Surrey Fest Downtown
As many as 4,000 people visit this festival each year to view the exhibits and enjoy food and live entertainment. • Holland Park, 13428 Old Yale Rd., Surrey • June 15, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. • surreyfest.com/

Breakout Festival 2019
Canada’s only all hip-hop outdoor music festival. Price of admission includes ride pass to Playland. • PNE Amphitheatre • June 15 and 16, 3 p.m. • Single day tickets: $99-$149, two-day tickets: $189-$269, breakout-festival.com

Car Free Day Vancouver
Car Free Day celebrates the vibrancy of Vancouver’s diverse neighbourhoods by organizing a multi-site annual arts and culture festival that reclaims traffic thoroughfares as community focused public spaces. Artists, local residents, performers, artisans, non-profits, and businesses re-imagine spaces normally reserved for vehicle traffic. • West End, June 15, noon-7 p.m., Denman Street from Davie to Robson • Main Street, June 16, noon-7 p.m., Main Street from Broadway to 30th Avenue • The Drive, July 7, noon-7 p.m. Commercial Drive from Venables to N. Grandview. • Free, carfreevancouver.org


Dani Barnes of Village Vancouver enjoys Car Free Day on Main Street.

Arlen Redekop /

PNG

Croatia Days 2019
Celebrate one of the most vibrant communities in the Lower Mainland! Enjoy live entertainment, folk dancing, music, choir performances, a children’s play area, futsal, video entertainment, a variety of fresh food, video entertainment and a beer garden. • Croatian Cultural Centre, 3250 Commercial Dr. • June 15, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. • Free admission, 604-879-0154, croatianculturalcentre.com

Gathering Festival Celebration in the Park
Following four weeks of festival programming for Vancouver’s inner-city community, the festival wraps up with a free all-day event featuring two stages, arts, crafts, community booths and family activities, including a headline performance by Canadian power-pop legends Odds. • Emery Barnes Park, Davie & Seymour Streets • June 15, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. • Free, gatheringfestival.wordpress.com

Hillcrest Summer Festival
Enjoy amusement rides, inflatables, games, activities, stage performances, a vintage car show and entertainment such as face painting, balloon art and musical performances. (In event of rain the event will take place at the Vancouver Curling Club, 4575 Clancy Loranger Way). • Riley Park, 50 E. 30th Ave. • June 15, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. • Free, 604-718-5885, hillcrestcommunitycentre.com

Langley: 25th Annual Community Day
This year the event will feature two stages, a food truck festival, beer garden, a kids and youth zone, fire rescue kids challenge, marketplace community organizations, and more. • Douglas Park, 20550 Douglas Crescent., Langley • June 15, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. • Free, 604-514-2940, langleycity.ca

Pacific Rim Kite Festival
This colourful annual extravaganza transforms Garry Point Park into two wind-whipped days of demos, kite battles, and individual and team flying shows. • Garry Point Park, Richmond • June 15 and 16, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. • bcka.bc.ca


Beautiful kites in a kite festival

Queer Arts Festival
The Vancouver Queer Arts Festival is recognized as one of the top five festivals of its kind in the world (Melbourne Herald Star). This year’s theme rEvolution gathers together artists who dissemble, push and transgress; art as the evolution of the revolution and will tie together nearly 100 artists and more than 20 events and programming including receptions, curated visual art exhibition, performing arts series, workshops, artist talks, panels, and screenings, parties and more! • Roundhouse Community Arts & Recreation Centre, 181 Roundhouse Mews • June 17-28queerartsfestival.com

Concord Pacific Dragon Boat Festival
North America’s flagship dragon boat festival returns to Vancouver. Kick off summer with three days of some of the continent’s best dragon boat racing, headliner music shows, cultural installations, interactive performances, local artisans and shopping, food, and family-friendly activities. • Concord Pacific Place, Creekside Park, and the waters of False Creek, 1455 Quebec St. • June 21-23 • Free, concorddragonboatfestival.ca


The Concord Pacific Dragon Boat Festival returns June 21-23.

Point Grey Fiesta
West 10th Avenue and Trimble Park are turned into a start-of-summer neighbourhood celebration with a parade followed by amateur stage performances, exhibitors, vendors and the only carnival in a Metro Vancouver park. The festivities kick off Friday afternoon with bike decorating at 4502 West 10th Avenue, and carnival rides start as soon as school is out at 3 p.m. in Trimble Park. Led by Fiesta’s mascot, Ole the Bull will start the Saturday morning parade at 10 a.m. Activities in Trimble Park include local businesses and artisans exhibiting and a variety of acts performing on stage. Carnival games and rides run until Sunday afternoon, and as a homage to Father’s Day, dads ride free with a child all day Sunday. • June 21-23 • Free, pointgreyfiesta.org/

TD Vancouver International Jazz Festival
One of the largest jazz gatherings in Canada brings together jazz legends, emerging musicians and contemporary visionaries from different countries. This year’s featured events include performances by Wu-Tang Clan, The Roots, and Herbie Hancock. • June 21 until July 1coastaljazz.ca/


Wu-Tang Clan will perform at this year’s TD Vancouver International Jazz Festival.

24th annual Scandinavian Midsummer Festival
Celebrate Midsummer with Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. There will be cultural displays, along with artisans, events for all ages and the best of Scandinavian foods. • Scandinavian Community Centre, 6540 Thomas St., Burnaby • June 22 and 23 • $10/adult, under 16/free, scandinavianmidsummerfestival.com

Cultus Lake Day
Kick the day off with Pancake Breakfast by donation at Cultus Lake Fire Hall, followed by a parade, an artisan market, food vendors, activities and more, all wrapping up with a fireworks show at 10 p.m. • Cultus Lake Park, 4165 Columbia Valley Hwy., Cultus Lake • June 22, 8:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m. • Free admission, cultuslake.bc.ca

Driediger Farms 6th Annual Strawberry Festival
Whether you are in the market for B.C.’s best berries, delicious artisan foods or a day in the sunshine with your family, this is the event for you. Shop local brands and eat local food! • Driediger Farms Market, 23823 72nd Ave., Langley • June 22, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. • facebook.com


Fresh local strawberries.

East Side Pride
Celebrate Pride on the East Side! Throw down a picnic blanket and take in an array of diverse performances, visit the Community Market with over 30 vendors and community partners, and grab a bite to eat at a food truck. • Grandview Park, Commercial Drive • June 22, noon • Free, vancouverpride.ca

Lynn Valley Day
The day starts with pancake breakfast (8:15-9:45 a.m.) followed by a local parade and a full day of family fun. Highlights include games, inflatables, Maypole dancing, face painters, live entertainment, food and a beer garden. • Lynn Valley Park, 3590 Mountain Hwy., North Van • June 22, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. • Free, lvlions.com

McBurney Plaza Summer Series
McBurney Plaza Summer Series will be filled with live entertainment, fun activities and amazing give-aways. • June 22, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.: Kick off summer with live music by Side One Band, backyard games and gourmet ice pops. • July 13, 6-10 p.m.: Enjoy an evening of live entertainment, local craft beer and wine, and delicious street food. Enjoy entertaining opening acts and an all request Dueling Piano Show. (Dueling Pianos in the Plaza is a 19+, adult only event). • July 20, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.: Downtown Langley will be the hub for celebrity spotting as we welcome a lineup of talented Legend impersonators to perform live. Enjoy popcorn as you watch the show, plus a paparazzi photobooth and face painting. • Aug. 10, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.: Prepare to be amazed! A unique and talented line up of magicians are ready to entertain you with live shows and roving magic. Enjoy magical balloon twisting, cotton candy and activities. • McBurney Plaza, 20518 Fraser Hwy., Langley • June 22 until Aug. 10 • Free, downtownlangley.com

National Indigenous Peoples Day: Langley
The Lower Fraser Valley Aboriginal Society invites you to come out and celebrate their unique heritage, diverse culture and many aboriginal achievements. • Douglas Park, 20550 Douglas Crescent, Langley • June 22, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. • Free, langleycity.ca

Strawberry Festival
Enjoy a celebration of summer days with the West End Community. Presented by the West End Seniors Network, this event will feature local vendors, community organizations, food, music, activities, free horse carriage rides and the best strawberry shortcakes in town! • Barclay Heritage Square, 1433 Barclay St. • June 22, 1-4 p.m. • Free, 604-669-5051, wesn.ca

Greek Day on Broadway
Live a day the Greek way and immerse yourself in a world of delicious Greek food and drink, market vendors, entertainment, and live music. • West Broadway from MacDonald to Blenheim • June 23, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. • Free admission, greekday.com/


Greek food is the fare at Greek Days festival on West Broadway.

Ric Ernst /

PNG

Golden Spike Days Festival
One of the oldest and longest running family events in B.C. this annual event features live entertainment, including headline performances by Big Sugar, Harlequin and Prism; plus special events; food and activities for all ages. The event commemorates the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway line and its arrival at the original Western terminus in Port Moody where the last spike was driven. • Rocky Point Park, 2800 Murray St., Port Moody • June 28 until July 1 • Admission by donation, goldenspike.ca/

Vancouver International Guitar Festival
Join guitar builders, players, collectors and aficionados for live music, master classes, special events, and the opportunity to see, hear and play some of the world’s finest handmade stringed instruments. • Creekside Community Centre, 1 Athletes Way • June 29-30vancouverguitarfestival.com/

Evo Summer Cinema Series
Enjoy an outdoor screening of your favourite films on the four-storey inflatable movie screen. Come early to enjoy lots of fun pre-show activities including games, giveaways and prizes, and grab some delicious bits at one of the food trucks. games, prizes, and giveaways, as well as the weekly offering of food truck fare and classic movie treats. This year’s film lineup includes: Wayne’s World, July 2, 9 p.m. | Beetlejuice,July 9, 9 p.m. | Shrek,July 16, 9 p.m. | Sleepless in Seattle,July 23, 8:30 p.m. | Moulin Rouge, July 30, 8:30 p.m. | Finding Nemo, Aug. 6, 8:30 p.m. | Harry Potter 3, Aug. 13, 8:30 p.m. | Jurassic Park, Aug. 20, 8 p.m. • Grand Lawn at Ceperley Meadows, Second Beach • Lawn seating if free, VIP reserved tickets available for a fee, eventbrite.ca

9th annual Indian Summer Festival
Bringing locally and internationally renowned artists to venues across the city with the provocative theme of Tricksters, Magicians, and Oracles; the 2019 festival lineup features futurists, novelists, stand-up comedians, musicians and storytellers from around the world. Highlights include: July 4: Indian Summer Festival Opening Party • July 5: International speakers series 5×15 • July 6: Conjuring the Future – a galaxy of potent musical voices from across Canada • July 7: Pico Iyer on Life, Love and Mortality. Writer, world-traveller and TED sensation Pico Iyer has spent his life answering the great questions of humankind • July 8-14: PAUSE Free Programming • July 12:Amjad Ali Khan & Sons with Sharon Isbin: Strings for Peace • July 4-14, indiansummerfest.ca


Amjad Ali Khan and Sons with Sharon Isbin – Strings for Peace.

Photo by SuvoDas

The Dancing on the Edge Festival
Canada’s longest running festival of contemporary dance is an eagerly anticipated highlight of the Lower Mainland’s dance season. This year’s DOTE presents extraordinary dance productions from Canada, Brazil and Korea, offering high calibre, challenging and gorgeous dance. The innovative and spell-binding work features World Premieres, North American and Western Canadian debuts, and works-in-progress from some of the most sought-after contemporary choreographers. • July 4-13, dancingontheedge.org/

Vancouver Greek Summerfest
This annual celebration of food, entertainment, and family fun features the famous barbecued lamb and Loukoumades, as well as hundreds of live singers and dancers on the Performance Stage. • 4641 Boundary Rd., July 4-14 • Free admission, vancouvergreeksummerfest.com/

Burnaby Arts Council: Summer Arts Festival
An outdoor festival celebrating summer, this fun and engaging event offers thrills, excitement and culture! The festival showcases local artists competing in a live art tournament, a variety of entertainment, artists and artisans and much more. • Outdoor event at Deer Lake Gallery, 6584 Deer Lake Ave., Burnaby • July 5 and 6 • 604-298-7322, burnabyartscouncil.org

Cinema Under the Stars
Start your weekend off with a Friday night experience at Cinema Under the Stars! Leigh Square will showcase recent movies on their enormous, 26-foot tall silver screen at Sun Valley and Gates parks. Pack a picnic, bring a blanket, round up some friends and bring the whole family. • July 5, 9 p.m. at Gates Park: Mary Poppins ReturnsJuly 19, 9 p.m. at Sun Valley Park: The Hidden WorldAug. 2, 8:45 p.m. at Gates Park: Ralph Breaks the InternetAug. 16, 8:45 p.m. at Sun Valley Park: Avengers: Endgame • Various venues, Port Coquitlam • July 5 until Aug. 16 • Free, in the event of rain, movie will be moved to the next available Friday. Movie subject to change so check for updates on the city website or call 604-927-8400 for confirmation., portcoquitlam.ca

Theatre Under the Stars: Mamma Mia! and Disney’s Newsies
Theatre Under the Stars (TUTS) invites audiences to a summer of inspiration with Mamma Mia! and Disney’s Newsies, running alternate evenings from July 5–August 17. A beloved Vancouver tradition since 1940, TUTS’ 2019 season offers two exuberant musicals: one that tells the lighthearted tale of a mother and a daughter who embark on a hilarious quest to discover the identity of the daughter’s true father; the other shares the stirring account of a ragged band of newspaper boys in 1899 in New York City who strike for fair pay and humane working conditions. • Malkin Bowl, Stanley Park • 604-631-2877, tuts.ca


TUTS is back for another season of outdoor theatre at Stanley Park’s Malkin Bowl.

Photo by Lindsay Elliott.

Whistler Children’s Festival
Fuelled by imagination, creativity and giggles, the Whistler Children’s Festival is the resort’s longest-running event, now in its 36th year. • July 5-7, whistlerchildrensfestival.com

10th Carnaval del Sol
The biggest Latin festival in the Pacific Northwest, featuring two days of live music, art, dance, sports, and poetry in celebration of Latin American Culture. Carnaval del Sol, recreates the atmosphere of a vibrant city plaza in Latin America. The arts showcased during this event include live musical bands, Native Canadian and Latin American visual art, traditional folk dances from different countries, arts and crafts displays, dancing and culinary lessons and a Latin American inspired fashion show. • Concord Pacific Place, 88 Pacific Boulevard • July 6 and 7 • carnavaldelsol.ca


Carnaval del Sol is the largest Latin festival in the Pacific Northwest.

PNG

Khatsahlano Street Party
Ten blocks of amazing music, merchants, food and fun, including performances by Hey Ocean!, The Boom Booms, Harlequin Gold, and many others. • West 4th Avenue from Burrard to MacDonald • July 6, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. • Free admission, khatsahlano.com

7th Annual Summer Repertory Festival
An uplifting comedy set in a doughnut shop, a classic political satire for the age of Trump and a celebration of the power of storytelling make this year’s Annual Summer Repertory Festival from Ensemble Theatre Company one of its most thrilling yet. Tracy Letts’ Superior Donuts, Garson Kanin’s Born Yesterday, and Michael Healey’s The Drawer Boy and brought to life by Ensemble’s talented group of actors, directors, and designers. • Jericho Arts Centre, 1675 Discovery St. • July 10 until Aug. 16 • From $25, Festival Pass: $88, ensembletheatrecompany.ca

Harrison Festival of the Arts
From the world stage to local artists there’s something for everyone at this annual 10-day festival. Other highlights include an Artisan Market, workshops and an art exhibit. • Harrison Hot Springs, July 12-21 • harrisonfestival.com

Punk In Drublic Craft Beer & Music Festival
This outdoor festival features craft beer and punk rock performances by NOFX, Bad Religion, The Real McKenzies, Anti-Flag, Chixdiggit, and The Last Gang. • PNE Amphitheatre, July 13 • Passes start at $69.50, ticketleader.ca


NOFX is one of the featured performers at this year’s Punk In Drublic Craft Beer & Music Festival.

Dario Ayala /

Montreal Gazette

Wind Festival for the Arts
Paddle, play and soar at this free three-day art and music festival celebrating all things wind and water. From amazing workshops to local artists and live performances, to the biggest artisan market we have ever seen, this is the largest free festival in Squamish. • Downtown Squamish, July 18-20 • Free, squamishwindfestival.com

107th annual Aldergrove Fair Days
One of B.C.’s best small-town fairs features world-class fun for the whole family. Highlights include musical performances including headliners Loverboy, a Show ‘n’ Shine Car Show, a chili cook-off and much more. • Aldergrove Athletic Park, July 19-21 • Admission by donation, 604-418-9507, aldergrovefair.ca

42nd annual Vancouver Folk Music Festival
Explore an amazing array of artists gathered from around the world. This year’s festival includes performances by Sam Roberts Band, Corb Lund, Charlotte Day Wilson, The Hamiltones, Larkin Poe, Basia Bulat, and many others. Other festival highlights include an Artisan Market, Folk Bazaar and the Little Folks Village for kids under 12. • Jericho Beach Park, July 19-21thefestival.bc.ca/


Catch the Sam Roberts Band at the 42nd annual Vancouver Folk Music Festival.

Surrey Fusion Festival
This two-day festival showcases and celebrates the cultural diversity of Surrey. The event brings together cultural and community groups from around the world, along with 150+ artists and performers. Live entertainment, food pavilions and interactive cultural activities will keep you busy throughout the weekend. • Holland Park, 13428 Old Yale Rd., Surrey • July 20 and July 21 • Free admission, surreyfusionfestival.ca

Squamish Constellation Festival
This brand new festival features three days and nights of music, art, food and fun featuring two stages and more than 40 acts of multiple genres. Headliners include Jessie Reyez, Bahamas and Serena Ryder. • Hendrickson Field, Squamish • July 26-28 • constellationfest.ca/


Serena Ryder headlines the brand new Squamish Constellation Festival.

Kayle Neis /

Saskatoon StarPhoenix

Mission Folk Music Festival
Staged in one of B.C.’s loveliest parks overlooking the Fraser River, the Mission Folk Music Festival is renowned for its mix of accessibility and easygoing comfort, affordability and small-town friendliness, and some of the finest folk, world, roots and blues music from across Canada and around the world. • Fraser River Heritage Park, Mission • July 26-28 • 604-309-6079, missionfolkmusicfestival.ca

Honda Celebration of Light
For three action-packed days and mesmerizing nights, the Honda Celebration of Light brings people together for a musical fireworks competition. This year features competing teams from India (July 27), Canada (July 31), and Croatia (Aug. 3). • English Bay, hondacelebrationoflight.com


India, Canada and Croatia will compete at this year’s Honda Celebration of Light.

Francis Georgian /

PNG

Columbia StrEAT Food Truck Fest
North America’s largest one-day Food Truck Festival features food trucks, beer gardens, live music and much more. • Columbia Street, downtown New Westminster • July 27, 4-10 p.m. • Free admission, downtownnewwest.ca

Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Country Fest
Enjoy 4H livestock shows, horse shows, home arts and gardening competitions, and backyard farming demonstrations. The daily entertainment includes live music, multicultural/community acts, roving entertainers and much more. • Albion Fairgrounds, 23448 Jim Robson Way, Maple Ridge • July 27 and July 28 • Free admission, mrpmcountryfest.com

Punch Bowl: Festival of Cocktails
Join more than 50 vendors sampling their finest summer spirits, beer and cider cocktail creations, plus live music and a barbecue. • PNE Fairgrounds • July 27, noon-3:30 p.m. or 5-8:30 p.m. • punchbowlfest.com/

Richmond Maritime Festival
Landlubbers and sea-goers of all ages will enjoy activities that delight one and all. Discover local lore, visit beautiful wooden boats, create works of art, bring your picnic blanket and enjoy the tasty treats. Take in music, painters, potters, stilt performers, puppets, story tellers and much more! • Britannia Shipyards National Historic Site, 5180 Westwater Dr., Steveston • July 27 and July 28 • Free admission, richmondmaritimefestival.ca/

Caribbean Days
Get ready to soak up some tropical rhythm, culture and food at one of the largest cultural events in B.C. Kick off the day at the Multicultural Street Parade, followed by a day of live entertainment, an international food fair, a craft market and a family zone with face painting and other activities. • Waterfront Park, North Van • July 27 and July 28 • caribbeandays.ca


Samba Dancers dance to the beat of Caribbean music on Esplanade Ave of North Vancouver.

SAM LEUNG /

PROVINCE

South Surrey Festival
A fun, family friendly event that offers safe, creative and inclusive activities for the whole community. Join us for a variety of activities and attractions like stage entertainment, face painting, crafts and games, artisans and vendors, food trucks and more. • South Surrey Recreation & Arts Centre, 14601 20th Ave., Surrey • July 27, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. • Free, 604-592-6970, surrey.ca

Vancouver Bach Festival
The Vancouver Bach Festival is one of the largest festivals of its type in North America, featuring a superb series of concerts with guest artists from all over the world. Concerts are held downtown at Christ Church Cathedral and at the Chan Centre for the Performing Arts on the UBC campus. • July 30 until Aug. 9earlymusic.bc.ca

62nd annual Squamish Days Loggers Sports Festival
Five days full of fun, excitement, action, and entertainment for the whole family. There is music, children’s activities, a kettle boil, a parade, wacky bed races, chainsaw chair carving, an 8km run, pancake breakfast, two world class Loggers Sports Shows, and so much more. • Al McIntosh Loggers Sports Grounds, 39555 Loggers Lane, Squamish • Aug. 1-5 • squamishdays.ca

Chilliwack Sunflower Festival
Features more than three acres planted in the giant Mammoth sunflower that can reach heights of 12 feet and taller. There will also be 1.5 acres planted in a cut flower orange variety which will reach heights between five and six feet. The fields are completed with an acre of show garden featuring 15 different varieties of different heights, colours and bloom sizes for guests to enjoy. • 41310 Yale Rd., Chilliwack • Aug. 1 • chilliwacksunflowerfest.com

Rockin’ River Music Fest
An impressive lineup of distinguished country music alumni featuring Jason Aldean, Old Dominion, Brothers Osborne, Maren Morris, Kane Brown and Brett Kissel. Over 30 acts performing across multiple stages as well as an expanded Party Zone, increased riverside and XL campsites, free-flow party patios, and more onsite amenities including food options, bars, and bathrooms. A new Entertainment District will be located in the Chattahoochee campground featuring added music, breakfast options, and late-night entertainment. • Merritt Festival Show Site, Neilson Street, Merritt • Aug. 1-4 • 4-day pass: $275-$425; 1-day pass: $60-$200 at rockinriverfest.com/tickets, rockinriverfest.com

Vancouver Mural Festival
The city’s largest annual free public art celebration brings artists and murals to Mount Pleasant and Strathcona, as well as a week of events including the Strathcona Street Party. • Aug. 1-10 • Free, vanmuralfest.ca


A man walks past a mural in the alley between Quebec and Ontario at the Vancouver Mural Festival.

Gerry Kahrmann /

PNG

Wanderlust
This festival brings together a remarkable group of yoga and meditation instructors, musical performers, speakers, artists and chefs for a transformational retreat. Choose your own adventure with multi-level yoga and meditation sessions, mouth-watering organic foods, heart-pumping music, inspiring lectures and workshops, and boundary-pushing outdoor activities. Find your true north. • Whistler • Aug. 1-4 • wanderlust.com

29th annual Harmony Arts Festival
The District of West Vancouver celebrates summer with free concerts, signature culinary events, movie nights, children’s programming, art markets, an Indigenous Showcase and more. This annual festival features 10 days of events and activities designed to showcase arts and culture and celebrate summer on the North Shore. An extensive array of programming includes more than 50 free live musical performances and concerts on two stages, art markets, al fresco culinary experiences on the waterfront, art demonstrations, talks, and exhibits, outdoor cinema nights in the park, fun activities and interactive art experiences for kids. • West Vancouver’s waterfront, between 14th Street and 16th Street on Argyle Avenue, West Van • Aug. 2-11 • Free admission, harmonyarts.ca/

Abbotsford Agrifair
The 109th annual Abbotsford Agrifair is set to return for another weekend of summertime fun in the country. Returning this year will be the popular midway rides, the Demolition Derby, the Laughing Logger Show, 4-H shows, the Country Horse Classic, the Global FMX Motorcross Show, Cannon Top Gun Logger Competition, the pig and duck races, nightly concerts and roving entertainers. New events include a Pirate Ship Show, a Tank car-crush event, a Tractor/Truck Pull Show, Yule Kids and so much more! • Abbotsford Exhibition Park, 32470 Haida Dr., Abbotsford • Aug. 2-4 • agrifair.ca

Tsawwasen Sun Festival
A three-day celebration of fun in the sun, jam packed with special events, games, friendly competitions and many other attractions. There’s antique hunting and skateboarding at the South Delta Recreation Centre and BINGO at KinVillage, while the bulk of the events take place at Winskill Park. The pride of the event is the annual Rotary Parade which heads down 56th Street from 16th Avenue to Winskill Park. • Tsawwassen • Aug. 2-5 • sunfestival.ca

19th annual Caribbean Festival
There is no shortage of reggae, ska, Soca and Cuban Salsa performances at this annual festival celebrating Caribbean culture. Enjoy two large stages offering continuous music, a wide variety of food vendors offering authentic Caribbean foods, street vendors and a large Kid Zone. • Albion Fairgrounds, Maple Ridge • Aug. 3 and 4 • 604-467-5535, caribbeanfest.ca

43rd annual Powell Street Festival
The largest Japanese Canadian festival in the country returns for its 43rd year. This year’s lineup of performers includes a wide variety of local and international talent. Enjoy stage performances, music, visual art exhibits, literary events, interactive installations, children’s activities, a craft market, martial arts demonstrations, amateur sumo tournament, historical walking tours, tea ceremonies, ikebana and bonsai demonstrations, and delicious Japanese cuisine. • Oppenheimer Park and surrounding areas, 400 block of Powell St. • Aug. 3 and 4 • Free, powellstreetfestival.com


The Powell Street Festival takes place August 3 and 4.

Studio by Jeanie /

PNG

Brigade Days
Explore the encampment of re-enactors showcasing the Hudson’s Bay Company era as they swap stories, play music, and show off traditional skills. Don’t miss the Arrival of the Fur Brigades canoe re-enactment at the river at 1 p.m. on Monday. • Fort Langley National Historic Site, 23433 Mavis Ave., Fort Langley • Aug. 3-5 • Regular admission applies, 604-513-4777, pc.gc.ca

Pride Parade & Festival
The three-hour parade route features approximately 150 entries offering non-stop entertainment. Enjoy floats, marching groups, dancers, community groups and performances. Immediately following the parade is the Sunset Beach Festival – a jubilant event featuring live music, beer gardens, vendor booths and more. • Starts at Robson & Thurlow, continues through the West End, finishing at the Sunset Beach Festival site • Aug. 4, starts at noon • Free, vancouverpride.ca


Scenes from the 2018 Pride Parade in Vancouver.

Nick Procaylo /

PNG

Anirevo: Summer 2019
Celebrate anime and Japanese pop culture in the heart of downtown. Join us this summer as we bring you even more amazing surprises and boatloads of memories! Highlights include cosplay, voice actors, panels and the Exhibitor’s Hall. • Vancouver Convention Centre • Aug. 9-11 • summer.animerevolution.ca

The 147th Annual Chilliwack Fair
This fair is the cornerstone of the summer event schedule in Chilliwack, where you can find family entertainment and friendly competition. The Fair’s widespread appeal makes for a truly community event, with attractions ranging from the crowd favourite BCRA Rodeo, the Laughing Logger shows, live music, pig racing and bouncy rides, to artist and cooking demonstrations, home and garden displays and a marketplace. • Heritage Park Chilliwack, 44140 Luckakuck Way, Aug. 9-11 • chilliwackfair.com

Abbotsford International Airshow
Canada’s National Airshow features all kinds of vintage planes and military aircraft, static displays and lots of performers including the Canadian Forces Snowbirds. • Abbotsford International Airport, Aug. 9-11 • abbotsfordairshow.com


Post media reporter Larry Pynn takes flight with the US Navy’s Blue Angles, prior to the 2018 Abbotsford international Air Show.

Francis Georgian /

PNG

Burnaby Blues + Roots Festival 2019
Officially celebrating its 20th anniversary this family-friendly event returns to Deer Lake Park with performances by Feist, Lord Huron, Dan Mangan, The War and Treaty, William Prince, and Southern Avenue. • Festival Lawn at Deer Lake Park • Aug. 10, 1 p.m. • $60/$70, ticketmaster.ca, livenation.com

Clover Valley Beer Festival
40+ breweries, 80+ brews, live music, food trucks and a kick-ass time! Partial proceeds go towards Twins Cancer Fundraising. • Bill Reid Millennium Amphitheatre, 17728 64th Ave., Surrey • Aug. 10gibbonswhistler.com

Kaleidoscope Arts Festival
With plenty to explore and site-wide beverage licensing, the Kaleidoscope Arts Festival will look and feel like an urban street festival. Includes performances by indie artists Current Swell, Royal Canoe and Terra Lightfoot. Try your hand at the arts, browse handcrafted wares in the artisan market, watch performing artists Blink Acro, Disco Funeral, Hip Hop Hoop, and visual artists Richard Tetrault and Sandeep Johal. ​Enjoy delicious food truck fare and sip craft beer and spirits. Music will fill the site, with DJ Emilita getting the festival vibe going at 2 p.m. and live concert performances hitting the TD Community Plaza stage starting at 4:30 p.m. • Town Centre Park, Coquitlam • Aug. 10, 2-9 p.m. • coquitlam.ca

RibFest Langley
For three hot days and nights, Langley will host the summer party of the year! Join us at McLeod Park for live music, cold beverages, and delicious Southern-style barbecue ribs, pork, beef and chicken, plus fresh local corn and a full offering of entertainment. • McLeod Athletic Park, 56th Ave and 216th St., Langley • Aug. 16-18 • Free admission, ribfestlangley.com

Rock Ambleside
This year’s classic rock festival will feature performances by Tom Cochrane with Red Rider, Honeymoon Suite, Quiet Riot, Blue Oyster Cult, Pat Travers, The Romantics, The Headpins, Streetheart, SAGA, Sass Jordan and David Wilcox. • Ambleside Park, West Van • Aug. 16-18 • rockamblesidepark.com

The Fair at the PNE
One of B.C.’s most beloved summer events and an annual tradition for thousands of families across the province. Showcasing a diverse entertainment line-up, internationally acclaimed musical performances, and rides and attractions, this year’s Fair delivers another exciting line-up of new exhibits and top-tier entertainment. Highlight’s of this year’s Fair include Reveen: The Superconscious Experience, Knights of Valour, The SuperDogs and a new line-up for the Summer Night Concerts. • Renfrew and Hastings St. • Aug. 17 until Sept. 2, open 11 a.m. till late • pne.ca/fair/


The SuperDogs are one of the many featured highlights at this year’s Fair at the PNE.

Jess Bell /

PNG

Richmond Garlic Fest
Highlights include fresh local garlic, garlicky delights from local restaurants, an expanded Farmers Market, live bird of prey flying demos, a Kid’s Zone with tons of farm & nature-themed activities, live music, farm tours, workshops and more. • Terra Nova Rural Park (The Sharing Farm), 2771 Westminster Highway, Richmond • Aug. 18, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. • By donation, 604-227-6210, richmondgarlicfest.com

Steveston Dragon Boat Festival
Steveston comes alive for one of B.C.’s biggest dragon boat races and one of Richmond’s most popular community festivals. Enjoy dragon boat races, live music, vibrant visual arts, entertainment, children’s activities, and culinary offerings, while kicking back and enjoying a relaxing summer’s day by the water. • Britannia Heritage Shipyard to Imperial Landing in Steveston Village, Richmond • Aug. 24 • Free, stevestondragonboatfestival.ca

Deep Cove Daze
This local community arts festival features entertainment on the waterfront, mainstage entertainment, a fun play zone for kids, a food court, a beer garden, an artisan/vendor alley, a sponsor area, and various events such as a kids parade, pie-eating contest, and a cardboard kayak contest. • Panorama Park, Deep Cove, North Van • Aug. 25-26 • Free, musart.ca/deep-cove-daze

Richmond World Festival
Features more than 90 artists on nine stages including headliners K-pop star Verbal Jint, Tokyo Police Club and Dragonette. Other highlights include Your Kontinent Digital Carnival, more than 50 food trucks in the FEASTival of Flavour, a culinary stage and Global Village, an artisan market place, the Bamboo Theatre and much more. • Minoru Park, Richmond • Aug. 30 and Aug. 31 • Free, richmondworldfestival.com

[email protected]

Related


Source link

7Jun

Town Talk: Former U.S. ambassador now advocates for all Canadians

by admin

FRIENDS IN DEED: In Bob Rennie’s Chinatown office-art museum recently, 2014-2017 U.S. ambassador to Canada Bruce Heyman and wife Vicki released a jointly written memoir of their time here. Titled The Art of Diplomacy, Strengthening the Canada-U.S. Relationship in Times of Uncertainty, the book reflects their personal friendship with and support of Democrat former president and fellow Chicagoan Barack Obama. Diplomats represent their own country’s interests above all, of course. Still, alternately authored chapters in the Heymans’ “love letter to Canada, our neighbour and best friend” show them contributing to fellowship and culture far beyond Washington’s remit and Ottawa’s political and diplomatic precincts.

Their resolve “to build bridges, not walls” resulted in a bike lane replacing post-9/11 concrete barriers at the ambassadorial residence, Lornado. They also filled the house with art, presented many eminent artists, hosted scores of public events, sparkplugged a visit by Obama, and installed honey bees who, with their queen, departed soon after they did. Conversing with and learning from ordinary folk, the Heymans criss-crossed Canada. That included days spent in Arctic-shore Tuktoyaktuk, Labrador’s Mary’s Harbour and even more remote Battle Harbour. When it came time to leave Canada, though, the news came, deplorably, in a New York Times article rather than a single word from the Trump transition team. “Vicki and I now consider ourselves citizen ambassadors for the Canada-U.S. relationship,” Heyman wrote. “We are private citizens working to make a difference.” Supporting that intent, they and Rennie donated all proceeds from their book sales to The Vancouver Sun’s Raise-a- Reader campaign.


Accompanied by daughter Ali in a simulated 1955 Chevrolet, Jen Rainnie chaired a gala to raise $900,000 for the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


Hweely Lim, Kirsten Maxwell and Lucia Kwong surrounded multi-charity $5-million benefactor Sylvia Chen at the Heart of Gold gala.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

MISS CANADIAN PIE: Jen Rainnie drove her Chevy to the levee, but it sure wasn’t dry. In fact, the levee — more specifically the Heart and Stroke Foundation of B.C. and Yukon’s 14th-annual Heart of Gold gala — reportedly generated $900,000 and change. Meanwhile, the Chevy that second-time gala chair Rainnie seemingly drove was actually a full-scale Styrofoam sculpture of the front end of a 1955 model. That was an epic year as a new-for-Chevrolet V-8 engine promised high performance. Rainnie, foundation chair Irene Chanin, board chair Brian Curin and all involved doubtless hope the gala will spur a similar result. That would include supporting an automated external defibrillator program planned to double the survival rate of those experiencing cardiac arrest.


Paul Armstrong heads the Crazy8s Film Society Andrew Williamson founded in 1999 and that received an outstanding-achievement Leo award.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

PICTURE PERFECT: Directors Helen Haig-Brown and Gwaai Edenshaw’s Edge of the Knife (Sgaawaay K’unna) cut through other nominees at the recent Leo Awards gala for B.C.’s film and television productions and personnel. It was named best motion picture, and Haig-Brown and Edenshaw received best-direction Leos. Director Menhaj Huda’s Harry & Meghan: A Royal Romance was named best TV movie.


Walter Daroshin and wife Tina walked the red carpet at the local movie industry’s Leo Awards gala he has headed since its second running in 1997.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

Staged by the Motion Picture Arts & Sciences Foundation of B.C., the event is nostalgic for chair Walter Daroshin. That’s because a feature film he’d executive produced, The War Between Us, won the 1996 debut running’s top award. Daroshin signed on as Leos president in 1997. Two years later, Andrew Williamson founded the Crazy8s Film Society that won this year’s outstanding-achievement Leo. Long headed by Paul Armstrong, its juried contestants shoot, edit and deliver short but sometimes superb movies in eight days.


Twins Sam and Kailey Spear made the short horror film Alien: Ore at Britannia Mine to commemorate the Alien feature film’s 40th anniversary.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

QUADS: One Crazy8’s production was written and directed by Bowen Island-raised twins Kailey and Sam Spear, and filmed by two more twins, Graham and Nelson Talbot. Nominated for six Leos, it has a robot nanny violently attack a mother regarding the care of her daughter. Keeping up the jollity, the Spears and Talbots made the short horror flick Alien: Ore in the Britannia mine. It’s the only Canadian picture among 20th Century Fox’s commissions to commemorate the original Alien’s 40th anniversary.


Tim Roddick accompanied entrepreneur-wife Madeleine Shaw at a plate-smashing benefit for the United Girls of The World Society she founded.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

SMASH BASH: You could wait for a Greek wedding to break plates. Or you could pay $20 for a plate emblazoned with the word for something you dislike — homophobia, perfectionism, say — and sling it against a wall. Attendees did that when multi-entrepreneur Madeleine Shaw fronted a fundraiser for the United Girls of the World Society she founded. The organization aids parents and caregivers “that assist in supporting adolescent girls’ development of personal empowerment, healthy peer relationships, self-esteem and body positivity.” Shaw’s accompanying husband, Tim Roddick, was newly met in 1996 when this column reported her launching a women’s apparel firm. “He had a girlfriend, and I was having unwholesome thoughts about him,” Shaw recalled. “But one thing led to another.” They married in 2001 — without smashed crockery.


City-based movie producer Tex Antonucci’s name was a consequence of animator-father Danny’s reverence for famed film cartoon creator Tex Avery.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

IN A NAME: Tex Antonucci, who co-produced the Leo Awards’ best-movie-nominated Indian Horse, was named to commemorate legendary cartoon animator Tex Avery. Antonucci’s father Danny made the cult classic Lupo The Butcher (Google it). His Ed, Edd n Eddy was possibly the last TV series to employ Walt Disney and Avery’s hand-painted-cell technique rather than computer animation. At least Danny didn’t name his son for a beloved Avery character: Bugs, Daffy, Elmer, Porky, etc.


Danny Antonucci’s TV series Ed, Edd n Eddy may have been the last one produced by hand-painted cells before digital technology triumphed.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

DOWN PARRYSCOPE: Th-th-th-that’s all, folks.

[email protected]
604-929-8456


Source link

31May

Town Talk: B.C. Sports Hall of Fame inducts Sedins and many others

by admin


Backed by a blow-up of Duomo di Milano cathedral, Ross Bonetti increased the La Dolce Vita flavour of his Italianate Livingspace store’s expansion party by straddling his two classic Vespa scooters.


Malcolm Parry / PNG

CHAMPS NIGHT: Chaired by Michelle Collens and Tewanee Joseph, the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame’s recent gala was replete with memories. It couldn’t be otherwise with inductees like the 1968 New Westminster Salmonbellies lacrosse team, 1975 NFL Super Bowl winner Roy Gerela and 1977 Vancouver Whitecaps coach Tony Waiters. Also inducted were 17-season Vancouver Canucks Daniel and Henrik Sedin.


B.C. Sports Hall of Fame inductees Henrik and Daniel Sedin were 21 when they served wine at a Canuck Place children’s hospice benefit in 2002.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

When seen in this column in 2002, the twins displayed deft passing skills. Not with the puck but with bottles of wine that then-Canucks GM and former part-time bartender Brian Burke had them serve at a benefit for Canuck Place children’s hospice. Back at the gala, rugby-star inductee Kelly McCallum heard honorary co-chair Marvin Storrow call her sport “a game of skill, not for me.” Then again, 1934-born Storrow does play hard, skilful tennis four times weekly.


Portrayed at age four with twin James, former MP, cabinet minister and senator Pat Carney will be inducted into the Order of British Columbia on June 28.

PNG

MORE TWINS: Shanghai-born siblings Jim and Pat Carney shared an 84th birthday May 26. They’ll celebrate again June 28 at Pat’s induction into the Order of British Columbia. The honour likely acknowledges her years as an MP, cabinet minister, senator and best-selling author rather than early-career slogging as a Vancouver Sun reporter.


Departing Vancouver Art Gallery director Kathleen Bartels welcomed Rogers Group Funds chair Phil Lind to a reception for film and television producers.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

MILES AHEAD: At the Polygon Gallery, Rogers Group of Funds chair Phil Lind presented a $5,000 emerging-artist prize to movie maker Jessica Johnson. It recognized her Scotland-set 14-minute documentary, Hazel Isle. Lind also fronted a reception for regional film and television producers on Vancouver Art Gallery’s rooftop patio. No one present, especially departing VAG director Kathleen Bartels, quibbled with his assertion that “Vancouver has the best artists in Canada — by 10 miles.”

SPACEMAN: The Armoury district’s free-standing Livingspace store always had room aplenty for swish European furniture. There’s even more now that building owner Ross Bonetti has expanded the fifth floor to accommodate specific-brand showrooms. As usual, Bonetti pulled out all the stops — and his two La Dolce Vita-style Italian Vespa scooters — for a recent relaunch party. He rides the mint-condition 1969 and 1971 Sprint models around town, but not astride both as he demonstrated with them parked. Ever the showman, perhaps he’ll master Ben Hur-style riding for his next event.


With a Dina Goldstein work behind them, sponsor Matthew Halse and Dr. Peter AIDS Foundation head Scott Elliott saw an art auction raise $185,000.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


Angela Grossmann’s mixed media work, Farm Boy, struck the right note at a Dr. Peter AIDS Foundation event where it fetched $9,500 at auction.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

PICTURES FOR PETER: Eighteen artists, from Thomas Anfield to Elizabeth Zvonar, didn’t stint when donating works for live auction at the Dr. Peter AIDS Foundation’s recent Art For Life event. Twenty-four others gave to its silent auction. With supporters filling Pender Street’s The Permanent hall, foundation executive director Scott Elliott reported $185,000 being raised.


Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun’s Opioid Ovoid Humanoid sculpture seems to come alive beside his painting in the Macaulay & Co. Fine Art gallery.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

TRANSFORMER TODAY: Imagine the wonderment of coastal longhouse dwellers when performers manipulated carved-cedar masks so that the creatures they depicted seemed alive. Something similar pertains at Sarah Macaulay’s First-off-Scotia gallery where long-established artist Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun’s first sculpture is displayed. The mask-headed work echoes figures in Yuxweluptun’s large paintings that fetch over $100,000. Step in front, though, and the mask becomes a confusion of multicoloured pieces. The spooky change represents “the process of what drugs do, and this can happen to you,” said Yuxweluptun, who named the $45,000 sculpture Opioid Ovoid Humanoid. There’ll be four more, he added.


Sirish Rao and Laura Byspalko had geo-strategist Parag Khanna (centre) address a $100,000 gala audience. Photo: Malcolm Parry.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

SUMMER WINNERS: The 11-day Indian Summer Festival will begin with its usual Roundhouse Community Centre party July 4. Revving up for that, organizers Sirish Rao and Laura Byspalko staged an Odlum Brown-sponsored banquet that reportedly raised $100,000 with the slogan: The Future Is Asian. That’s the title of a new book by geo-strategist Parag Khanna, who addressed attendees. His assertion is supported by the multinational Standard Chartered Bank’s 2017-to-2030 projection for global economies. It foresees China’s GDP rising to $64.2 trillion, India’s to $46.3 trillion and the U.S.A.’s to $31 trillion. Meanwhile, Canada, France and the U.K. lose their global top-10 positions.


Beverley Robinson, Sonja Chopty, Margaret McFaul and Renata Hofer ringed “termite taxi” owner Tevie Smith at a memorial for promoter Harry Moll.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

ROUNDER BOUT: Old-time Howe Street flickered again on Hornby Street recently. That was when Neil Aisenstat opened Hy’s Encore restaurant’s upper room to those attending a wake for 1988 Promoter of The Year Harry Moll who died at age 83 on April 25. Although most old Vancouver Stock Exchange habitués arrived on foot, Tevie Smith pulled up in his somewhat symbolic “termite taxi,” a junk-festooned 1947 Chrysler “woody” sedan with 300,000 miles on the clock and two rescue dogs on its duct-taped seats. As for the chi-chi era, wake attendees Sonja Chopty, Renata Hofer (who flew in from Zurich), Margaret McFaul and Beverley Robinson recalled partying in the Moll-launched Sneaky Pete’s, Charlie Brown’s and Sugar Daddy’s nightclubs. Moll’s 1994-divorced wife Suzy was unavoidably out of town but still speaks warmly of him.

THE DRILL: Regarding the old stock exchange’s freebooting mining promotions, a contemporary of Moll’s once said: “Sometimes we drill the ground, and sometimes we drill the sky.”

DOWN PARRYSCOPE: Canadians and Americans wrangling over the North Pole’s ownership might recall that cheeky London journalists long ago determined principal-resident Santa Claus’s citizenship. A bewhiskered, overstuffed fellow who feasts on cookies and works one day a year would be a fellow Brit, they said.

[email protected]
604-929-8456


Source link

19Apr

Town Talk: Style show made big hair even bigger

by admin

HATS OFF: Nobody expected Easter bonnets, fascinators or headgear of any kind when the Show It Off extravaganza filled the Vancouver Playh­­ouse recently. Hair alone was the attraction, and Avant Garde salon owner Jon Paul Holt and dancer-choreographer producer Viktoria Langton showcased plenty of it when the male and female show benefited B.C. Children’s Hospital. Stylist from the UK, across Canada and hereabouts created confections that, in most cases, were frothed up on models attired in the Playboy rather than Easter bunny manner.


Dee Daniels will return from her and Denzal Sinclaire’s U.S. tour to sing at Motown Meltdown’s benefit for Seva Canada’s eyesight-restoration efforts.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

HIGH FLYERS: Early aviators gained surprising extra height by flying at top speed and jerking back the joystick. They called it the zoom climb. A century later in 2008, one-time television wunderkind Moses Znaimer applied the term to half-century-old folk able to elevate their lifestyles. Among now-77-year-old Znaimer’s related enterprises, Zoomer trade shows feature travel, financial, cannabis and health-and-wellness exhibitors. Entertainers, too.


Joy TV’s CARPe diem show host-producer Carmen Ruiz y Laza greeted Motown Meltdown’s Bill Semple and Kendra Sprinkling at the Zoomer Show.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

The recent Zoomer show here saw Kendra Sprinkling produce a version of the 17th annual Motown Meltdown concert that will play the Commodore Ballroom April 27. Its beneficiary, Seva Canada, restores eyesight to thousands of global patients annually. One concert singer, Dee Daniels, will zoom home from her and Denzal Sinclaire’s touring tribute to the late Nat King Cole and daughter Natalie.


Vancouver Sun Sun Run columnist Lynn Kanuka and editor-in-chief Harold Munro welcomed guests at a reception preceding the 35th annual event.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

FEET FEATS: Olympic bronze medallist Lynn Kanuka’s columns helped prepare Vancouver Sun reader for last weekend’s 35th annual Sun Run. She and run co-founders Doug and Diane Clement were acknowledged at a reception where Sun editor-in-chief Harold Munro noted that the 10k event’s earlier participants had covered the equivalent of 10 times around the world. Kanuka’s 2019 columns revealed that her training world extends northward to Burns Lake and New Aiyansh beyond Terrace. With three other regions, they’re part of her 10-year-old effort by which Indigenous leaders develop running and walking programs. Regarding such communities’ elders, “Their health has changed,” Kanuka said. “Their blood pressure has gone down.” So have blood-sugar and cholesterol levels, “One has even lost 100 pounds,” she whistled.

DO GO: Although tough by foot, the few B.C. residents following remote, spectacular Highway 37 north from New Aiyansh to the Alaska Highway should relish every one of its 750 kilometres.


Some wonder whether the brotherly love Jason Kenney had for Charlie Wu in 2015 will extend to other Vancouver residents now that he’s Alberta premier.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

KENNEY, CAN HE? During 2015 TaiwanFest celebrations here, then-federal immigration minister Jason Kenney called festival manager and former University of San Francisco fellow student Charlie Wu “my Chinese brother with different mothers.” Let’s see if such familial regard for B.C. residents will continue.


Monica Soprovich, Tanya Perchall, Rebecca Bond and Carey Smith ringed host Zahra Salisbury at the Hotel Georgia’s Reflections terrace reopening.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

SKY TIME: Springtime sees the Rosewood Hotel Georgia’s substantially open-air Reflection terrace reopen formally. Rain made the recent event rather more al drencho than fresco. But with one area permanently covered and some others tented, attendees stayed dry and, given the enhanced intimacy, possibly more reflective. They were hosted by Zahra Salisbury, whose brother Azim Jamal and uncle Joe Moosa founded Pacific Reach Properties that paid $145 million for the then-90-year-old hotel in 2017.

UP PARRYSCOPE: One block west on Georgia Street, the Depression-delayed Fairmont Hotel Vancouver will celebrate its 80th birthday on May 9.


Seen partying at his architecture firm’s old Gastown premises, keg-surrounded Michael Green literally raised the bar with an Armoury district move.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

GREEN PARTIERS: Free drinks and a high-volume deejay would fill any Friday-night joint to the rafters. So it was when A-grade party giver and wood-structure-tower advocate Michael Green celebrated his self-named architecture firm’s move to Armoury-district space formerly occupied by Emily Carr University students. Despite a new climbing wall, Green’s guests didn’t actually reach the joint’s near-10-metre-high rafters.


Kelsey Kushneryk and Lindsay Owen alternate between piloting a Twin Otter and a rebuilt and re-engined DC3 aircraft between Arctic and Antarctic bases.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

Still, two among them routinely reach higher altitudes in places quieter, colder and far more dangerous than False Creek shores. Former rodeo roper-funeral director Kelsey Kushneryk and partner Lindsay Owen are 4,000- and 5,000-hour pilots who have spent six seasons flying for Calgary-based Kenn Borek Air in Antarctica and the Canadian Arctic. Owen hit the news in 2017 as first officer aboard a Twin Otter that sped 14,000 km from Alberta to rescue two sick workers in ‑­­60 C temperature from near the blizzard-whipped South Pole. She and Kushneryk also pilot an 80-year-old DC-3 airliner that, like the same-age axe with four new heads and six new handles, has likely had every part replaced and turbine engines installed.


Vancouver International Centre for Asian Art interim head Yun-Jou Chang and president April Liu fronted 20th-anniversary celebrations at the Imperial.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

A-PLUS: Now ensconced on Keefer Street with a 30-year lease, the Vancouver International Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, aka Centre A, celebrated its 20th anniversary recently. President April Liu and interim executive director Yun Jou Chang welcomed centre founder Hank Bull and guests to the Main-off-Hastings Imperial where Chinese-language kung-fu movies once were screened. Las Vegas-born Liu is a Chinese art historian and Museum of Anthropology public-programs curator. Belgium-born, Taiwan-and-Prince-Rupert-raised Chang is vice-president of the pan-Asian Cinevolution Media Arts Society. As well as encouraging beginning artists, the centre “strives to activate contemporary art’s vital role in building and understanding the long and dynamic Asia-Canada relationship.”

DOWN PARRYSCOPE: While Chinese genetic scientists transfer human brain cells to monkeys, the reverse process may have been perfected in London, Ottawa and Washington, DC.

[email protected]
604-929-8456


Source link

22Feb

Town Talk: Chinese community raises $4.1 M for Children’s Hospital

by admin

ANOTHER RECORD: First-time co-chairs Carman Chan, Isabel Hsieh and Pao Yao Koo hit a home run when the Chinese community’s 24th annual For Children We Care gala reportedly raised a record $4.1 million. That will go toward a $14-million campaign for relocating the development-and-rehabilitation Sunny Hill Health Centre for Children to the B.C. Children’s Hospital’s main campus.


Carman Chan, Isabel Hsieh and Pao Yao Koo chaired a Versailles-themed gala to reportedly raise $4.1 million for the Sunny Hill Centre for Children.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

Last year’s event brought in close to $$3.4 million, which exceeded 2017’s by $836,000. Contrasting the hospital’s fiscal prudence, the gala’s theme was Versailles, the extravagant palace and estate that helped bankrupt 18th-century France and send King Louis XVI and Queen Marie Antoinette to the guillotine. Conductor Ken Hsieh and the Metropolitan Orchestra entertained gala-goers with music from Parisian Jacques Offenbach’s 1858 Orpheus In The Underworld that also enlivens the cancan dance. Happily, the gala’s fundraising co-chairs proved that they could-could and did-did.


Third-time For Children We Care gala presenter Ben Yeung saw Open Road dealer Christian Chia display a $500,000 Rolls-Royce Cullinan SUV.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

FOR PAINT JOBS WE CARE: Open Road auto dealer Christian Chia showed a $500,000-range Rolls-Royce Cullinan SUV at the For Children We Care gala. Viewers included the event’s third-time presenter, Peterson development firm executive chair-CEO Ben Yeung. Few buyers of the off-road-capable Cullinan would likely subject its flawless, porcelain-like surface to damage along bush-and-rock-flanked trails. Ditto when parking by night in certain DTES zones, including one where developer-to-be Yeung located his fresh-from-varsity dental practice.


Hometown Star recipient Jim Pattison was feted by Premier John Horgan but hasn’t hire him to a top job as he did a predecessor, Glen Clark.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

STARRED: Local self-made billionaire Jim Pattison and entertainers Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg have received Hometown Stars from the Canada Walk of Fame organization. The local ceremony followed a flossier one in Toronto where Paul Anka and investments supremo Warren Buffett serenaded Pattison with Frank Sinatra’s My Way. Rogan and Goldberg were lauded here by fellow walk-of-famer Howie Mandel. Also by teacher Mike Keenlyside from Point Grey Secondary where their stars will be embedded. Of their alma mater, “Everybody needs to know that Seth was a dropout and didn’t graduate,” Goldberg cracked.


Entertainers Seth Rogan and Evan Goldberg received Canada Walk of Fame stars that will be embedded at their Point Grey Secondary alma mater.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


Howie Mandel and chef-restaurateur Vikram Vij attended a ceremony for city-raised billionaire Jim Pattison and entertainers Seth Rogan and Evan Goldberg.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

When John Oliver Secondary grad and legendary toiler Pattison was asked if he really ought to be at work during daylight, he replied: “The answer is: Yes.” As for working for Pattison as former NDP premier Glen Clark does, successor John Horgan said: “I’ve got a job right now, but that’s an option.” That option would doubtless pay more than his current $205,400.16 salary. Meanwhile, Horgan and others might heed Pattison’s words: “Do the little things well and the big things will follow.”


Long-time Bella Bella resident Ian McAllister directed and Seaspan principal Kyle Washington executive-produced the Great Bear Rainforest Imax film.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

BEAR FACTS: Another billionaire hit town recently. That was Seaspan Marine Corp. head Dennis Washington whose US$6-billion-range net worth is close to Pattison’s but whose 332-foot yacht Atessa IV overpowers the latter’s 150-foot Nova Spirit. Washington arrived for the premiere of Great Bear Rainforest, an Imax movie executive-produced by his son and Seaspan ULC executive chair, Kyle. Its director, Ian McAllister, met the younger Washington three years ago at a luncheon for the Pacific Wild Foundation that McAllister co-founded. Rather than conventional digital shooting, three-decade Bella Bella resident McAllister argued for Imax’s costlier 70mm film system that promises worldwide access to young audiences. The picture’s own young characters include Mercedes Robinson, who lives in 350-population Klemtu and retrieves DNA from trees where bears scratch themselves. Of her debut movie role, Robinson said: “You can get a lot of information from bears … who are guardians of the eco-system and have the ability to make it thrive and make the land more healthy.” When grown up, “I hope to provide information to the younger generation so that they protect the (bears’) territory and save it from those taking it from them.”


B.C. Women’s Hospital Foundation CEO Genesa Greening and board chair Karim Kassam fronted a $300,000 fundraiser for chronic-disease diagnosis.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

NEED FOR SPEED: B.C. Women’s Hospital Foundation president-CEO Genesa Greening and board chair Karim Kassam reported $300,000 was raised at the recent Illuminations luncheon. That’s where guests were illuminated regarding thousands of women plagued by slow-to-diagnose health concerns. A tenfold increase in research funding is said to be needed to address complex chronic diseases that are up to nine times likelier to affect women than men.


Aide de camp and former Vancouver police inspector, Bob Usui, escorted Lieutenant-Governor Jane Austin at a B.C. Women’s Hospital Foundation fundraiser.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

MEADOW MONEY: Attending the luncheon, the B.C. lieutenant-governor and former Women’s Hospital Foundation board member, Janet Austin, called the hospital’s researchers “some of the best in the world.” Then, pointing to retired Vancouver police inspector Bob Usui, who is one of her 35 ceremonial aides de camp, she told guests: “People think he is the lieutenant-governor, not me.” Her joke likely reminded some of an earlier LG, David Lam, who claimed that children sometimes misheard his title as “left-handed governor.” As for research-funding, Austin sounded in tune with rancher-predecessor Judith Guichon by saying: “Money is like manure — no good if it isn’t spread.”


Gillian Siddall was installed as president and vice-chancellor at Emily Carr University of Art + Design’s still-new False Creek Flats campus.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG

NEW CARR: Bonhomie, not money, was spread on Great Northern Way recently with Gillian Siddall’s induction as Emily Carr University of Art and Design’s second president and vice-chancellor.  She succeeds 22-year incumbent Ron Burnett who oversaw the much-enlarged academy’s move from Granville Island.

DOWN PARRYSCOPE: February 23 is International Dog Biscuit Day or, for humans taking a mouthful, World Sword Swallowers Day.

[email protected]
604-929-8456


Source link

25Jan

Good sex is all in your head, says The Wellness Show speaker

by admin

The Wellness Show

When: Feb. 2 and 3, 10 a.m.

Where: Vancouver Convention Centre West

Tickets and info: From $12.50 at thewellnessshow.com


Now in its 27th year, The Wellness Show is once again offering up experts to help you do a better job at almost everything; from getting off carbs, getting your morning off to a good start, and, well, getting it on.

The latter on that list is the focus of the presentation: Mind-Knowing Sex is Mind-Blowing Sex: Using Mindfulness to Cultivate Sexual Desire(Feb. 3, 11 a.m.) as part of the two-day Women and Wellness Seminar Series.

Bringing that bit of Buddhism to the bedroom is University of B.C. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology professor and psychologist Dr. Lori A. Brotto, who is also the author of the book Better Sex Through Mindfulness.

Brotto’s book and Wellness Show presentation is the culmination of 15 years of incorporating mindfulness into her sexual health research and clinical work with patients.


Dr. Lori A. Brotto.

PNG

“It is just a powerful strategy for teaching people to be in the here and the now,” said Brotto.

“So many people with sexual problems talk about a disconnect with their body.”

Brotto’s accessible and interesting text — the book is not an expanded academic paper —  moves between hard research, anecdotal examples and practical exercises to help make the sexual experience more enjoyable and engaging for women.

Of course the big O (orgasm not Oprah) is a major player in the conversation about better sex.

“In every study we have done there’s been a significant improvement in ease of reaching orgasm and intensity. It makes a lot of sense,” said Brotto.

“What is orgasm? It is extension of arousal. Because in mindfulness you are really paying attention to the body sensations and really paying attention to when arousal is increasing and mounting and where in the body the arousal is. It’s completely logical then that orgasm would be a natural result of that.”

If you have been awake at all in the last few years you will have undoubtedly heard about mindfulness. The practice has surpassed its spiritual realm and set up shop in the mainstream.

“It (mindfulness) is not just something Buddhist monks do in a cave,” said Brotto.

“It’s hot Western health care, big time. Not just mental health care but also medical health care. Cancer agencies run mindfulness groups because of the data showing mindfulness slows tumour progression. Healthy heart programs run mindfulness  groups because of the affects of mindfulness on regulating heart patterns and arrhythmia, etc. So it has hit big time.

“I think one of the big strengths is that it isn’t just a passing fad because the science really stands up to the claims,” added Brotto.

“We have strong data that shows how it works and why it works and also where in the brain it works, too.”

Related

You know what else works? Talking about sex. But sadly we don’t do it enough as women. There still seems to be a shyness or shame factor that stops women from seeking out conversations about sex.

Brotto says data shows men who develop erectile dysfunction do not hesitate to ask their family doctor what’s up with their non-performing penis. She says, after all, “we live in a culture that prizes men’s erections.”

One of the reasons women may balk at talking with their doctor about bad sex is that women often just accept it.

“I think women do need to be a bit more intolerant of difficulties at least as far as talking to health care providers and saying: ‘is this normal? Is there anything I can do? Or should I just accept it?” said Brotto.

“We have so much more comfort having sex than we have comfort talking about it.”

Brotto hopes her book and public appearances will nudge women towards more open dialogues about sex and female sexual dysfunction. It really can be a big factor to enjoying a healthy, happy life, she says.

“The sex conversation is critical, because sex isn’t just this isolated thing that people do recreationally. It is so heavily intertwined with sense of self, mood and relationship satisfaction, fundamentally self esteem,” said Brotto.

“We know countless studies have shown that when there are problems sexually all those different domains start to take a toll as well. It is a fundamental aspect of quality of life, and so in the same way we take very seriously our physical health we have to pay attention to sexual health, too.”

While Brotto is encouraging more women to talk about sex, she says health professionals may not be giving enough attention to the topic of female sexual dysfunction. But she hopes that as more women take ownership of their sex life and  ask questions more doctors will look for answers, and conversations will occur.

“But what we are not seeing though is an improvement in doctors talking about it. Doctors getting trained in it,” said Brotto.

“Accessibility to treatment that’s what we’re not seeing. So that will probably be a downstream affect but definitely the conversation around this and also around agency is important. Women saying: ‘I value my sex life. It’s important to me.’ And consent and conversations around pleasure are very important. That is where things like the #metoo movement have really benefited that conversation.”

Brotto hopes attendees of her lecture at the Wellness Show, and those who pick up her book, will benefit from her research.

“Sexual desire, all of the science has taught us it is responsive,” said Brotto.

“It’s something that can be cultivated. It is something that can emerge. It’s not that you are born with a set level of desire and you’re just sort of stuck with that for the rest of your life and so if it goes down you just have to learn to live with it.”

Brotto says we need to get through our heads that desire, like happiness, can be cultivated. So if we really pay attention in the moment in a non-judgmental fashion we can make our desire more responsive to our environment.

Brotto is just one of 100 or so guest speakers/chefs/fitness demos that are on hand for show goers. The Convention Centre floor is also teeming with around 250 vendors.

[email protected]

twitter.com/dana_gee

Related

CLICK HERE to report a typo.

Is there more to this story? We’d like to hear from you about this or any other stories you think we should know about. Email [email protected]




Source link

13Jan

PuSh 15 keeps the cutting-edge arts festival experience razor sharp

by admin

PuSh International Performing Arts Festival

When: Jan. 17 to Feb. 3, various times

Where: Various venues around Vancouver

Tickets and info: pushfestival.ca


The Dear Norman letter on page 15 of the program for PuSh 15 puts the 15th annual PuSh International Performing Arts Festival in context.

This is the first time that the now fixture on the local cultural events calendar hasn’t been helmed by its co-founder Norman Armour. The touching thank-you note from friends, colleagues and staff to the outgoing artistic director lauds him and co-creator Katrina Dunn for launching the cutting-edge arts showcase.

Interim artistic director Joyce Rosario says a lot of thinking went into how to program this year’s event to both celebrate the festival’s foundation and recognize boldly moving forward.

Related


Attractor is Indonesian trance-noise group Senyawa and dancers from Dancenorth Australia.

Gregory Lorenzutti /

PNG

“Right from choosing the cover image the program (of UK performer Selina Thompson’s show SALT.) to how we decided to celebrate our 15th anniversary without our founder, the question was how do we express gratitude for the work that went into making such a great event,” said Rosario.

“So we brought back the opening and closing night parties, which we haven’t done in a long time, to celebrate where we’ve been and we are going. Also, we ran a big ticket promotion of $15 dollar tickets for the first 15 days of sales, and that was a really great experiment to discover which shows were popular and went the fastest, who were the new people getting tickets, and the tastes of ongoing audience members.”

Even an event as established and successful as PuSh must be constantly studying its metrics to determine how to maximize audiences.

The nature of the performances that the festival presents is such that even sellouts don’t always add up to big profits, as artists travel large distances and many of the productions have substantial stage technical builds.

Curating the multiple shows is always a balancing act; an act that the festival has proven adept at juggling year in and year out, offering up the kinds of experiences that resonate with audiences long after they happen.

PuSh is, ultimately, about accessing transformative experiences and PuSh 15 will kickoff with a bang.


Kimmortal.

Iris Chia Photography /

PNG

The free opening night bash at Club Push (Jan. 17, Beaumont Studios, 9:30 p.m.) features Vancouver’s sharp queer Filipinx MC Kimmortal and art-fashion-dance collective Immigrant Lessons performing selections from their new collaboration titled X Marks the Movement. It promises to be a potent mix of art, politics and partying.

UK cabaret provocateur Lucky McCormick’s Triple Threat — a “trash-punk morality play” retelling the New Testament — is at the closing night party at XY (Feb. 2, 9 p.m.). Hardly wine and cheese events, both of these bookends define what makes PuSh what it is.

“Sure, we’re niche, and attract those who are willing to dive in and take a chance on something you might not know,” said Rosario.

“PuSh fans are a couple of things: People who are driven by their curiosity, looking to have an interesting conversation or insight into performing arts that they see; and often regular audience members for one thing, such as dance, who take this time of year to stretch out and see something completely different, such as a mix of an Indonesian noise band with an acclaimed Australian dance group (Attractor, Jan. 18 – 19, Vancouver Playhouse).

Rosario admits the latter is how she approached her first PuSh festival events a decade ago. She loved it so much that she kept coming, and now can’t envisage the local cultural scene without it.

Related

While Vancouver was always a hotbed of multidisciplinary performance, there was much more separation of the genres when PuSh began. The landscape has shifted profoundly since then.

“I think that it’s how artists are working, and how they have been working, and we were just more aware of it early on; now other folks have cottoned on is all,” Rosario said.

“So the big question becomes how do you remain in the know of what are the new practices. The city has changed, the arts scene has changed, and now we are in this liminal moment where we are about to transition into something different with new leadership; that’s exciting.”

The fact is that almost all of the major arts and cultural festivals in the region — and, to a large degree, worldwide — are undergoing regime changes as their founding Boomer base steps aside to let the next generation lead. It’s something that Rosario and Armour discussed often over their five years of working together before his retirement.

This year’s event still bears Armour’s hand, as it was in motion when he decided to move on to other pursuits. Rosario admits there are shows this year where she isn’t sure who initially suggested booking the artists.


Kinalik: These Sharp Tools by Evalyn Parry, left, and Laakuluk Williamson Bathory.

Jeremy Mimnagh /

PNG

“Norman was from Upper Canada, I’m from East Van, yet we found common working ground and fun doing it,” she said.

“My lens is definitely more of a dance one than he had, which was one of the reasons he brought me on board. As we move onward there are bound to be more examples of new interests in the programming, but we’ve always had a wide variety and scope.”

The 15th edition includes over 150 performances of 26 productions from 24 companies representing 13 countries. Of these shows, six are world premieres, 11 are Canadian premieres and six of those are western Canadian premieres.

It’s a huge undertaking for the eight staff and 20 contract employees who make it happen. The 2005 budget was under $200,000. This year will be more than $1.7 million. Audience attendance is expected to top 17,500. For a celebration of non-mainstream arts, that’s massive.

It’s also challenging in terms of deciding what and what not to see. Aware of these demands, the festival even has its own official collaborative beer to quaff while you make your selections. Strange Side is a joint creation from Strange Fellows Brewing and Parkside Brewery and will be available at Club PuSh, and other venues.

Related

Rosario and the PuSH team are developing a program that reflects the 15th festival theme of issues around diversity, accessibility and gratitude. She is particularly excited about three shows around this theme at this year’s festival:

1 – SALT. (Jan. 24 – 26, 8 p.m.,) and Race Cards (Free, Jan. 23 – Feb. 2, both at Roundhouse)

“Obviously, UK artist Selina Thompson is on the cover and we are lucky enough to have her here for two shows, which is really great because I love her work. One is a free installation and the other is a theatre piece and this gives the audience a really solid introduction. Having her here for two things rather than having to wait maybe years for another chance to present is special.”


2 – Attractor (Jan 18 – 19, Vancouver Playhouse)

“Three of the elements I love so much — dance, music and performance — in one program from Dancenorth Australia, with the amazing band Senyawa. These guys are as influenced by heavy metal and noise as they are by traditional Indonesian music and paired with these dancers should be fantastic. Rully, the vocalist, who is down in Portland, asked me if I knew Tanya Tagaq and could introduce them, because he would really like to meet her. Pretty awesome.”



Kinalik: These Sharp Tools, from left, Evalyn Parry and Laakuluk Williamson Bathory.

Jeremy Mimnagh /

PNG

 3 – Kinalik: These Sharp Tools (Jan. 30 – Feb. 2, Performance Works)

“A show by Toronto’s Buddies In Bad Times theatre with the company head Evalyn Parry performing with Inuk artist Laakuluk Williamson Bathory exploring things they got to jamming on during an Arctic expedition together. It’s about being female artists and their relationships to the environment, being from Toronto and Iqaluit. Shows with powerhouse women, I’m all for.”

• PuSh festival programs are available at local JJ Bean outlets and other locations. 

[email protected]

twitter.com/stuartderdeyn

Related

CLICK HERE to report a typo.

Is there more to this story? We’d like to hear from you about this or any other stories you think we should know about. Email [email protected]




Source link

11Jan

Town Talk: Revisiting folk from 2009 who helped bring about today

by admin

2009 began somewhat in reverse to 2019. Back then, newly inaugurated Barack Obama occupied the White House and signs of a severe economic recession were declining. Here in B.C., gang violence increased dramatically just as we celebrated being assigned the 2010 Winter Olympics. Principal bidder Jack Poole would die before those low-snow games began. Famed architect Arthur Erickson perished, too, as would two of the 35 folk (and one fast ferry) portrayed on this page. Still, they and the 33 others revisited from 2009 columns contributed in still-evident ways to the character of the province we cherish.


Nanaimo-born singer-pianist Diana Krall had friend Sir Elton John join a benefit concert for Vancouver General Hospital’s Leukemia Bone Marrow Transplant program in memory of her mother Adella who succumbed to multiple myeloma in 2002.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


Gwen Point accompanied husband Steven, B.C.’s first Aboriginal lieutenant governor, at the 64th-annual Garrison Military Ball that no longer entailed the presentation of serving or retired warriors’ debutante daughters.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


Restaurateur chefs Rob Feenie, Tojo Hidekazu, Michel Jacob, Pino Posteraro and Thomas Haas participated in the Senza Frontiere dinner that benefitted the Chef’s Table Society’s bursary and scholarship programs.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


Nimisha Mukerji and Philip Lyall premiered their 65_Red Roses documentary about cystic fibrosis patient Eva Markvoort who, despite a double-lung transplant, would die in 2010 but still spur medical-research fundraising.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


Kasi Lubin and Shauna Hardy Mishaw kicked off the eighth-annual Whistler Film Festival they’d founded with a $30,000 fundraising and that, under Hardy Mishaw, has become a fixture that bow screens 90 international movies.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


Cognoscenti already knew that one way to get vehicles like this 1938 Alfa Romeo 8C 2900 B Coupe into Pebble Beach concourse d’elegance contention was to have them restored by RX Autoworks’ Mike Taylor and Ian Davey.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


Graduate student Hong Zhu was the first to take up residency when Prospero International Realty Inc. chair Bob Lee opened the 81-room MBA House at the University of B.C.’s Robert H. Lee Graduate School of Business.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


Recently retired from the National Ballet where fellow principal dancer Karen Kain called her “the iron butterfly,” Chan Hon Goh prepared to lead the Goh Ballet company that parents Choo Chat Goh and Lin Yee Goh founded.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


With four PuSh International Arts Festivals behind him, founder Norman Armour prepared to welcome 30,000 ticket buyers to a 21-show season and to continue doing so until his retirement from a much-grown event in 2018.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


One year after the institution he headed became Emily Carr University of Art + Design, president Ron Burnett told students that up to 96 percent of them could expect to “become what you imagine, from an artists to an entrepreneur.”

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


B.C. Children’s Hospital Foundation Crystal Ball committee member Sherry Doman welcomed friend and 20-times ball supporter Indra Sangha who, though now terminally ill with ever-spreading cancers, said: “I had to come.”

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


Rev. Mpho Tutu heard then-nine-year-old pianist Jeffrey Luo play Mozart and Chopin airs at a benefit for her archbishop-father’s Desmond Tutu Charitable Foundation and the Dali Lama Centre for Peace and Education.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


Having starred in the multi-Genies-winning The Necessities of Life, star Natar Ungalaaq flew from Igloolik, Nunavut for a screening attended by director Benoit Pilon’s former classmate, city-based filmmaker Lynne Stopkewich.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


Michaela Morris and Michelle Bouffard’s now-dissolved House Wine Enterprises firm was a go-to for many seeking wine know-how and especially those with 2,000-bottle cellars that needed supervision and enhancement.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


Concord Pacific chief Terry Hui and Westbank Projects Corp’s Ian Gillespie were already big-time developers when they checked what architect Walter Francl had done for Bob Rennie’s 97-year-old Wing Sang Building.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


Ask A Woman event-planning co-principal Tammy Preast lifted 14-year-old Casey at a gala-benefit for the Love On A Leash firm she founded that would later raise funds for such organizations as the Dhana Metta Rescue Society.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


Brent Comber rescued water-borne forest debris to carve imposing artworks and Obakki clothing firm principal Treana Peake raised funds to construct water wells and permanent schools for those living without either in South Sudan.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


On the last day of the year, a marine-transport vessel carried away a Pacificat fast ferry, one of three that failed to meet operational and economic demands and that, after long mothballing, were sold for pennies on the dollar.

Malcolm Parry /

PNG


Source link

This website uses cookies and asks your personal data to enhance your browsing experience.