LOADING...

Category "Health"

20Mar

BC to launch measles catch-up campaign with shots at schools, clinics

by admin


Source link

13Mar

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip: ‘I want my son’s death to be meaningful’

by admin

“There’s no way to describe the enormous shock a parent experiences when you get a phone call informing you … You lose your ability to stand, and you sink into the closest chair. Your heart stops and you just can’t believe it. This terrible wave of shock goes through your entire body.”

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip took that terrible call last August from his wife, Joan. She was nearly hysterical.

“The minute I heard her, I thought, ‘Oh, no. Oh, no.’ She kept saying over and over, ‘He’s gone. He’s gone.’”

It was Aug. 7, 2018, the day after Kenny Phillip’s 42nd birthday. Their oldest son had died alone in a hotel room of a carfentanil overdose in Grand Prairie, Alta.

“I don’t think he knew that he had taken carfentanil,” his father told me. “But nobody was more well-versed in addictions and the variety of drugs available than he was.

“Having gone through so many treatment programs, he had high level of expertise. He knew everything about his addictions, the pattern and so forth. Yet he still was vulnerable to the powerful call of the addiction.”

Kenny struggled with addiction to drugs and alcohol since he was a teenager, and had been to at least half a dozen treatment programs. Still, his father said, “You’re never ready for that phone call.”

His son followed the usual cycle. Bouts of drug and alcohol use punctuated by detox, treatment and periods of recovery. His longest recovery period lasted nearly three years. But this time, his parents were optimistic that it was different.

He had graduated from the Round Lake Treatment Centre. He was working as an apprentice mechanic. He loved it. He had been obsessed with cars since he was a kid. One of the people who worked with him in Penticton described Kenny to me as “a helluva guy.”

After he died, a former co-worker designed a logo with two crossed wrenches, Kenny’s initials with the years 1976 and 2018, and had decals made up so that his friends could honour him by sticking them on their toolboxes.

Phillip says something happened when Kenny went up to northwestern Alberta, triggering his addiction. And given Grande Prairie’s reputation as a crossroads for drugs, he wouldn’t have had to go far to find them.

Northwest of Edmonton, Grande Prairie has had several recent large drug busts. In January, RCMP seized four kilos of crystal methamphetamine, 2.2 kilos of cocaine, 200 grams of heroin, about 5,500 oxycodone tablets and about 950 fentanyl tablets.

A few months earlier, guns, ammunition as well as meth, cocaine, heroin and magic mushrooms were seized in a follow-up to a July raid.

“I have first-hand knowledge,” Phillip said. “I started drinking when I was 15, and was 40-something when I sobered up. It was the hardest thing that I ever did, and I was an alcoholic not strung out on crystal meth and some of the street drugs.

“But I know that at the end of the day, it’s up to the person. The individual.”

Seven years into marriage with, at the time, three children — two daughters and Kenny — Phillip’s wife told him she was finished with the fighting, picking him up when he was drunk, and buying liquor for him. But if he wanted to carry on, he was free to go.

“I thought, ‘Free at last,’” Phillip recalled. “I lasted a month. I was downtown drinking with all my so-called buddies talking about my newfound freedom. One evening in a Chinese restaurant — nobody else was there — I put in an order and was staring at the tabletop. I just broke down. I started crying and then howling.

“The howling was coming from the soul. I was scared stiff.”

At that moment, he realized his stark choice.

“If kept going, I was going to die at my own hand. But to contemplate stopping … which at the time was like contemplating to stop breathing or stop eating because it was such an integral part of who I was.”

What had kept Phillip from suicide, he told the Georgia Strait in May 2018, was the thought of his son. “I thought he would have to grow up with that stigma.”

With the help of Joan and Emery Gabriel, a drug and alcohol counsellor and the only sober friend Phillip had, he got into treatment at the Nechako Centre and has never relapsed.

Every day, Phillip thanks the Creator for sobriety because abstinence has enabled him to take on the work he has done and continues to do as president of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs, grand chief of the Okanagan Nation, and as a board member for Round Lake Treatment Centre.

Phillip grieves for the “incredible, amazing young man who touched so many different lives” and for the choice Kenny made last August, knowing full well the risk he was taking in the midst of the opioid overdose crisis.

He speaks openly, and urges others to as well, because those who have died need champions to bring about change.

“I want my son’s death to be meaningful,” Phillip said. “The path forward has to be an abundance of resources to help those who are struggling with addictions. … More treatment centres, more programs, and a greater commitment from governments and society to pick up the responsibility for it.”

So far, governmental response has been “minimalist,” said Phillip.

“This notion of harm reduction is just kicking the issue down the road. It’s not dealing with getting people from an addictive state to where they are clean and sober. That’s what we need to do.”

As for cannabis legalization, Phillip said, “I just shake my head when I think of where we are at and the direction we are going.”

[email protected]

Twitter: @bramham_daphne


Source link

11Mar

Whooping cough case confirmed in Duncan

by admin


A Vancouver Island Health Authority office in Victoria.


Times Colonist

A case of whooping cough has been reported in Duncan, making it the second confirmed case on southern Vancouver Island in recent days.

After a laboratory confirmed that a Duncan adult had a case of pertussis, a letter was sent out by Island Health on March 8, agency spokesperson Jennifer Parisi said Sunday.

The letter went to areas where there might have been exposure. People were asked to watch for early signs of whooping cough and to follow up with their health care provider if they have any symptoms.

In that case, “There are no high-risk contacts and no further follow up is required by public health or the communicable disease team so there is no concern there,” she said.

It is not out of the ordinary to have two cases of whooping cough in the region, Parisi said.

Island Health sent another letter out this past week, informing the Mount Douglas Secondary community that a case of whooping cough had been confirmed at the school.

The pertussis bacteria can be spread through coughing, sneezing, sharing drinks or cigarettes, and kissing.

Small babies can be especially vulnerable to pertussis, said Parisi, who recommends that vaccination records be checked to ensure everyone is up to date.

Cold-like symptoms appear and the illness can advance to a severe cough with a whooping sound. Gagging and vomiting are also possible. Island Health said symptoms can continue for several weeks.

Antibiotics are used to treat whooping cough.


Source link

6Mar

Psilocybin touted as magical relief from death anxiety

by admin


Windsor, Ont., police display a large quantity of drugs on Jan. 13, 2012, that were seized in the area, including psilocybin (magic mushrooms) shown here.


Dan Janisse / The Windsor Star

The active ingredient in magic mushrooms may soon be used to help people with a terminal illness come to terms with death.

A counsellor in Victoria is part of a team that wants to use the psychedelic substance psilocybin to treat a condition called end-of-life distress when someone suffers from a combination of anxiety, depression and demoralization.

Bruce Tobin said that there are about 3,000 people with a terminal illness across the country whose end-of-life-distress is so severe that traditional treatments have been unable to alleviate it.

“We are being very restrictive about the clients we are seeking to treat,” he said. “We’re only seeking to treat those for whom all other treatments have failed. There is now growing scientific evidence that this is likely to be effective for them.”

On Tuesday, Tobin was part of an application to Health Canada seeking a Section 56 exemption to the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act. The exemption allows researchers, including physicians, veterinarians and others affiliated with universities and private industry, to use a controlled substance. Psilocybin is a controlled drug under Schedule III of the act.

Tobin is a registered clinical counsellor who practises psychotherapy. He leads a clinical team that includes two doctors, two psychologists, two registered clinical counsellors and a nurse/pastoral counsellor. All have received specialized training in psychedelic medicine.

Tobin said he wants to see psilocybin used to treat patients who “have nothing left to lose and who are in abject pain.” He said his team would use pharmaceutical grade psilocybin, not ‘magic mushrooms’ whose active ingredient is psilocybin.

“The effects from the synthetic psilocybin, as far as I know, are indistinguishable from the effects of organic mushrooms,” he said by phone from a town south of La Paz in Baja, Mexico. “There are certainly perceptual, cognitive and emotional changes that a person experiences while under the effects of psilocybin. It is precisely those changes that result in a kind of re-evaluation of their life situation.

“They gain new insights and perspectives on their life and its meaning and their relationships. It helps them reframe their understanding of their impending death and leads, in a vast majority of cases, to a much deeper acceptance of death as a part of life and an understanding that even though they’re dying that basically, everything is OK.”

Recent studies, he said, have shown that treatment with psilocybin produces large decreases in depression and anxiety, along with increases in quality of life, life meaning and optimism.

In one study, a six-month followup after treatment showed that about 80 per cent continued to show clinically significant decreases in depressed mood and anxiety.

He said psilocybin would be used in association with psychotherapy that includes screening, assessment, preparation and followup.

Tobin said if Health Canada denies the application, then his team is prepared to challenge the decision in court using the same kind of Charter arguments used for medical cannabis.

In 35 years of treating anxiety and depression, Tobin said he’s seen little improvement in the effectiveness of medications despite all the billions of dollars spent on developing them.

“Psilocybin promises to be a game-changer,” he said in a news release. “Medicines such as this may well soon revolutionize not only palliative and hospice care, but psychotherapy and psychiatry in general.”

[email protected]

CLICK HERE to report a typo.

Is there more to this story? We’d like to hear from you about this or any other stories you think we should know about. Email [email protected].</p


Source link

27Feb

Dementia law report recommends better oversight on health care consent

by admin

Jim Mann wants everyone to know that he’s more than his dementia.

He was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s 12 years ago, but that doesn’t mean he can’t be involved in making decisions about his health.

The distinction is important for Mann — and many others living with dementia. The Surrey resident is thinking a lot about consent these days after being part of an advisory committee on health care consent for people with dementia. Their report, Conversations About Care, was released Feb. 27.


Surrey resident Jim Mann was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s 12 years ago.

Arlen Redekop /

PNG

Mann, 70, said professionals in health care still make assumptions about people with dementia.

He recalled an emergency room incident when a nurse yelled his name and added “patient only.”

“My wife and I stood up and walked over. Halfway there, she (the nurse) yelled again ‘patient only.’ I got up to her and said ‘my wife needs to be with me. I have Alzheimer’s.’ She turned around and looked me up and down and said ‘well, you look fine.’ “

Mann said that while the public might not always understand that dementia is a cognitive impairment not a physical one and therefore not visible, he believes that kind of language isn’t acceptable in a health care environment.

“Within the medical system, I’m sorry, you should really know this by now,” he said.


Jim Mann says professionals in health care still make assumptions about people with dementia.

Arlen Redekop /

PNG

The two-year collaborative research project that Mann was a part of was undertaken by the Canadian Centre for Elder Law and the Alzheimer Society of B.C. Funding included a $40,000 grant from the Law Foundation of B.C.

The goal of the project’s Conversations About Care report is to ensure that the legal framework in B.C. remains strong enough to protect people living with dementia as well as those named as their legal substitutes.

In 2018, about 70,000 people in B.C. were living with dementia. By 2033, that number is estimated to increase to almost 120,000.

Krista James, national director of Canadian Centre for Elder Law at the University of B.C., said the report is intended to start a conversation about the rights of people with dementia.

“I feel that we’re missing that rights-based lens that recognizes the rights of older people to make choices about what happens to them,” she said.

Related

“Although the law is different in each jurisdiction, and this report applies specifically to the experience in B.C., we need to open up that conversation to think about the citizenship rights of older people in a health care context. It’s really urgent.”

The report’s 34 recommendations were developed through a process that included consultation with people living with dementia, family caregivers, health care professionals, and others who deal with consent on a regular basis.

James said the origins of the report came from phone calls she received from family caregivers who felt frustrated that decisions were being made without consultation.

B.C. is ahead of many other provinces because of our comprehensive health care consent statute called the Health Care (Consent) and Care Facility (Admission) Act.

“From our perspective, the health care consent law in B.C. is super robust and I think fairly clear,” James said.

“It says if it’s not an emergency, you need to get that prior informed consent. The care facility regulations that govern long term care don’t seem to be consistent. There is a lot more wiggle room.”

That means some physicians, licensed practical nurses and care aids don’t understand the concept of prior informed consent for non-emergency care.

“I have talked to a few people who think that if the person is in the care facility they have consented to all the care that the people who work there think is the right care for them,” she said.

“Some of the staff don’t understand they have to get consent. They confuse admission to the care facility with consent to all the meds.”

One of the report’s recommendations calls for all licensed long-term care facilities to set out rules on restraints, including chemical restraints (medications such as antipsychotics used to control aggressive behaviour).

Other big concerns include the challenge of sorting out situations where family members making decisions about care for someone with dementia can’t agree on what to do. One way to address that, James said, is to have social workers involved in helping families find a solution.

James said the report recognizes that health care providers are never going to be experts on the law.

“They’re not lawyers,” she said. “We shouldn’t expect them to be experts on the finer details of the law. They need to have support so they can properly interpret the law.”

Related


Recommendations of the report

• Improving health care decision-making laws in B.C. by adding language to recognize that people’s capacity to make health care decisions can vary from day to day and decision to decision, and that they be involved to the greatest degree possible in all case planning and decision-making.

• Address barriers to informed consent experienced by Indigenous people and people who need language interpretation, and create financial incentives to support physicians so they can spend time to talk with patients and families.

• Create a review tribunal to allow people living with dementia to review health care decisions made by substitute decision makers.

[email protected]

Related


You might also like:


CLICK HERE to report a typo.

Is there more to this story? We’d like to hear from you about this or any other stories you think we should know about. Email [email protected]


Source link

22Feb

B.C. pharmacists push immunization after Vancouver measles outbreak

by admin

Community pharmacists in B.C. have joined a chorus of health officials urging residents to get vaccinated after a recent outbreak of measles in Vancouver.

The B.C. Pharmacy Association is reminding the public that pharmacists across the province are prepared to give booster shots or new vaccinations to adults and children five years or older. The measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine is publicly-funded and available from pharmacists in nearly every community, the association said in a news release Friday.

“Community pharmacists are one of the most accessible health care providers and have had the authority to provide injections since 2009,” said the association’s CEO, Geraldine Vance.

“Families and individuals looking to make sure their vaccinations are up-to-date can go to their local pharmacist for care.”

Vancouver Coastal Health also recommends vaccinations. People who have previously had the infection do not need immunization.

B.C. children born in or after 1994 routinely get two doses of the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, one dose when they turn a year old and another before they start kindergarten.

People born before 1994 or who grew up outside of B.C. may need a second dose. People born before 1970 are likely immune; but if they aren’t sure whether they have had the infection, they can safely get the MMR vaccine.

Vaccinations and boosters are also available at doctors’ offices, and Immunization B.C. provides a map of local health units offering publicly-funded vaccinations at immunizebc.ca/finder. Services vary by location.


READ MORE: 

Measles in B.C.: How we got here and what you need to know

Burnaby family on edge after high-risk baby exposed to measles at children’s hospital


Earlier this week, Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada’s chief public health officer, said measles is a “serious and highly contagious disease” and that getting inoculated is the best way to avoid getting sick — and transmitting it to others who may be unprotected.

Tam’s comments Tuesday came after a cluster of nine cases of measles in Vancouver that began in recent weeks after an unvaccinated Canadian child contracted the disease on a family trip to Vietnam.

The rate of immunization among students at the two Vancouver schools where the outbreak originated has since increased, according to an update earlier this week from Vancouver Coastal Health.

At École Secondaire Jules‐Verne and École Rose-Des-Vents, both francophone schools, the measles immunization rate is now 95.5 and 94 per cent respectively, said Althea Hayden, a medical health officer, at a news conference Tuesday.

“Before this outbreak started, we had documentation for only about 70 per cent of students having immunity,” said Hayden, adding that the rise in immunity is not just due to new vaccinations but also the result of those who have now reported their vaccination records, when their immunization status was previously undeclared.

Herd immunity requires a threshold of about 92 per cent.

The B.C. Centre for Disease Control tracks child immunization and reports that 82.1 per cent of children aged seven had been immunized for measles in 2018, compared to 88.4 per cent in 2017 and 90.2 per cent in 2016.

With files from Tiffany Crawford, Stephanie Ip and The Canadian Press

[email protected]

twitter.com/nickeagland




Source link

21Feb

Daphne Bramham: B.C. group’s call for legally regulated heroin sales is unfounded

by admin

Desperate times call for desperate and often unfounded measures. And, that’s exactly what a new report from the B.C. Centre on Substance Use is proposing in response to the unabating opioid overdose crisis.

It wants government to immediately clear the way for “heroin compassion clubs.” These would be free-standing co-op stores staffed by health care providers selling untainted heroin — diacetylmorphine — to members at the same price or less than street heroin. It would be free to members who can’t afford it, even though the report acknowledges that the risk of street resale of prescription opioids is greatest when the drugs are free.

And that would all be possible, the report says, because of things like volume discounts and “other economies of scale.”

“It would be precisely measured and dispensed in known quantities and at relatively safe doses,” says the report that was released Thursday. The emphasis has been added.

The heroin would be in powdered form, rather than an injectable liquid, just like it is on the street except this would be untainted heroin, not heroin cut with caffeine to prevent overdoses or any other additives to bulk up the product.

Members would be able to buy a couple of days’ supply and take it home with them.

Membership would be low-barrier, a term that’s not defined in the report.

Applicants would be screened by staff members who are “health care providers,” although not necessarily addictions physicians.

The co-op’s board members would be people with “lived experience” — a.k.a. users and former addicts.

Evan Wood, the head of the B.C. Centre on Substance Abuse, says the proposal is unprecedented so there is no evidence that it would reduce overdose deaths or disrupt organized crime’s role in fentanyl, money laundering or housing affordability, which is what’s advertised on the report’s cover.

“To be fair, we are in an unprecedented situation with fentanyl and the prescription opioids overdose crisis,” Wood said. “We are in uncharted waters.”

The two main goals are keeping users alive and disrupting the evils of organized crime.

These are ambitious albeit inappropriate goals for an organization whose mandate is to “develop, help implement, and evaluate evidence-based approaches to substance use and addiction.”

Using heroin to treat users isn’t new. But every other trial or program has a treatment component whether they’re at Vancouver’s Crosstown Clinic, the PHS Community Services or in European countries.

In Europe, heroin is prescribed with the goal of stabilizing users to a point where they can get jobs, form relationships or switch to other (cheaper) opioid replacement therapies such as methadone or Suboxone. (The annual cost per patient in European prescription-heroin programs ranges from $19,000 in Switzerland to $30,000 in the Netherlands.)

But there’s nothing like this in Canada.

“I’m not aware of the existence of ‘heroin clubs’ anywhere else,” Jann Schumacher from the Swiss-based Ticino, an organization of addictions specialists, said in an email. “In Switzerland the heroin assisted therapy is strongly regulated and always under medical control.

“Our Swiss model (heroin assisted treatment) has strong evidence as a harm reduction method, in getting people into treatment and stabilizing their lives, and in reducing the illegal market.”

To qualify, Swiss patients must have at least two years of opioid dependence and at least two failed tries using other addictions treatment methods. They are only allowed to the drug in pill form and take it with them after being in the program for six months and only if it’s necessary to hold down a job.

Drug-related crime in Switzerland has decreased 90 per cent. But compassion clubs would have no effect on drug-related crimes because members would still have to find some way to buy the heroin.

As for disrupting organized crime, the report suggests that compassion clubs would be competing for sales, influencing both the demand and market for heroin.

“The establishment of a regulated and controlled supply of fentanyl-unadulterated heroin may increase demand for street heroin among persons who use street opioids and force organized crime groups to return to the provision of heroin as part of the illicit drug market,” the report says.

And since violence is criminals’ usual response to unwelcome competition, it seems likely that they will attempt to terrorize compassion clubs out of business.

What makes this proposal all the more absurd is that it is aimed only at British Columbia. Surely, low-barrier access to pure heroin would be a magnet to every opioid user across the continent, let alone Canada.

British Columbia is already the epicentre of the overdose crisis just as it was ground zero for the cannabis legalization movement that began with compassion clubs dispensing so-called “medical marijuana,” which led to an explosion in unlicensed and unregulated pot shops.

It’s also where Canada’s harm-reduction model was birthed with free needles, supervised injection sites and readily available naloxone. But it was supposed to be part of a four-pronged strategy just as Switzerland’s is — a strategy that includes access to treatment and recovery as well as education aimed at dissuading drug use.

But since 2017, the $608 million spent by the B.C. government has gone almost exclusively to harm reduction. Yet, the number of overdose deaths is still rising.

It’s clearly not working and Canadians can’t help noticing now that 9,000 are dead including more than 4,000 in British Columbia. According to an Angus Reid poll released last week, 85 per cent of Canadians want mandatory treatment for opioid addiction. Forget legalization or free drugs, decriminalization was favoured by only 48 per cent.

Although the B.C. Centre on Substance Abuse is proposing a radical and untried solution, Wood dismissed mandatory treatment as an option because it’s unsupported by evidence.

As for decriminalization, Wood said, “The problem with it is that you still leave control of the market to organized crime. The user is not criminalized, but they still have to go to the black market.”

Yet, 20 years’ worth of evidence from Portugal show that paired with assertively promoting treatment and recovery, providing universal access to those programs and enforcing drug trafficking laws, decriminalization works.

There, it not only effectively brought an end to Portugal’s heroin overdose crisis, addiction and usage rates for all drugs including cigarettes and alcohol are now among the lowest in Europe.

[email protected]

Twitter: @bramham_daphne

 


Source link

16Feb

Health Canada seizes illegal eyewash product from Richmond store

by admin

Health Canada is warning the public about a potentially dangerous eyewash product seized from a health store in Richmond.

In an advisory, Health Canada says consumers who bought “Kobayashi Aibon/Eyebon Eyewash” from Tokyo Beauty and Health Care on Westminster Highway in Richmond should stop using it because it contains a prescription drug called aminocaproic acid that may pose serious health risks.

The product is promoted as an eyewash for contact lens users and for the prevention of eye disease.


Health Canada has seized Kobayashi Aibon/Eyebon Eyewash from a health store in Richmond because it poses a potential safety risk. 

Handout /

PNG

Prescription drugs should be taken only under the advice and supervision of a healthcare professional because they are used in relation to specific diseases, and may cause serious side effects.

The unauthorized health product was packaged and labelled in Japanese. Health Canada says as a result information about ingredients, usage, dosage and side effects may not be understood by all consumers.

Health Canada previously warned about this product after it was seized at a different retail store.

The agency says it has seized the products from the retail location and is working with the Canada Border Services Agency to help prevent further importation.

Aminocaproic acid is a prescription drug ingredient used to decrease bleeding in various clinical situations. Exposure to aminocaproic acid in the eye may affect the eye itself, and the acid may be absorbed through the tear ducts into the blood.

Side effects may include watery eyes, vision changes, headache, dizziness, nausea, muscle weakness, and skin rash.

Is there more to this story? We’d like to hear from you about this or any other stories you think we should know about. Email [email protected]


Source link

14Feb

Petition calls for mandatory vaccinations in B.C. schools

by admin

An online petition is calling on the provincial government to make vaccinations mandatory in B.C. schools following a second reported case of measles in Vancouver, and an outbreak of that disease south of the border.

The petition, which as of Thursday afternoon had more than 1,800 signatures, asks Premier John Horgan to amend B.C.’s current enrolment policy to include mandatory vaccines except with medical exemption.

It was launched by Maple Ridge mom Katie Clunn, who says one concern people have is that they don’t want to give up their right to choose what is best for their family.


An online petition is calling on the B.C. government to make vaccines mandatory for B.C. school children.

Sean Gallup /

Getty Images

She says mandatory vaccines won’t force anyone to vaccinate because parents would have the choice to home school their children. She adds the move would protect the most vulnerable children, including those with compromised immune systems and babies who have not yet been vaccinated.

Clunn, who is pregnant with her third child, says she launched the petition not just out of concern for her own children but also on behalf of all the vulnerable children and adults with health concerns.

“If your child is going through chemo you should know how many kids haven’t been vaccinated,” she said Thursday. “Four year olds with leukaemia shouldn’t be scared to visit their friends at school.”


Katie Clunn, a Maple Ridge mother, has started a petition to ask the government to make vaccines mandatory in schools.

She notes that schools protect kids with allergies, for example, by banning peanuts, something Clunn says she wholeheartedly supports, but don’t protect kids who are at risk of developing a preventable disease like measles.

She hopes the government will take note of the deadly outbreak in Europe and the state of emergency in Washington and reconsider making vaccines mandatory at schools.

Postmedia requested an interview with the chief medical health officer; however, a spokeswoman with the Ministry of Health said Dr. Bonnie Henry was unavailable Thursday.

“You are always entitled to choice, but you are not exempt from the consequences of your choices. We cannot send unvaccinated (children) to school for the safety of those who can’t be vaccinated, as well as for the safety of those who won’t vaccinate,” said Clunn.

What do you think? Should parents have to show proof of vaccines before school enrolment?

On Wednesday, Vancouver Coastal Health confirmed a second case of measles in Vancouver in a week. The news comes as there is an outbreak of measles in Washington State, where 54 cases of the disease have been confirmed. Gov. Jay Inslee has declared a state of emergency because of the outbreak.

At least eight people have died in Ukraine, where 53,000 cases have been reported. The skyrocketing measles rates there are believed to be due to vaccine refusal as well as a temporary breakdown in vaccine orders by the government.

In Vancouver, health officials said the latest case was transmitted locally, and confirmed that the person is a school-age child.

The first case, acquired abroad, was confirmed on Saturday.

Last year, six cases were confirmed across B.C., up from a single case in 2017 and two cases in 2016, according to the B.C. Centre for Disease Control.

B.C. last experienced a measles outbreak in 2014, when 343 cases were reported, most of them linked to an outbreak in a religious community that objects to vaccination.

The World Health Organization named “vaccine hesitancy” one of its top 10 threats to global health in 2019. Measles saw a 30 per cent increase in cases globally between 2016 and 2017, and a resurgence in some countries that were close to eliminating it, according to the organization.

Ontario and New Brunswick have mandatory immunizations with exceptions and proof must be shown at the time of school enrolment.

[email protected]

With files from Nick Eagland and The Associated Press


Source link

7Feb

Daphne Bramham: B.C. opioid deaths up despite spending millions

by admin

2018 was British Columbia’s deadliest year for illicit drug overdose deaths despite the hundreds of millions of dollars poured into mitigating the continuing public health crisis.

An average of four British Columbians died each day, a rate that has resulted in a drop in the predicted life expectancy for everyone living here.

British Columbia — and Vancouver, in particular — is the centre of the national crisis even though it has long been the testing ground for harm-reduction strategies that have included free needles, supervised injection sites and opioid replacement therapies including methadone, Suboxone and, more recently, pharmaceutical grade heroin.

B.C. has led Canada in getting free naloxone — the antidote for opioid overdoses — into the hands of emergency responders and users. It has set up free drug-testing sites.

Earlier this year, the City of Vancouver funded an expansion of a pilot project to provide pharmaceutical-grade heroin to users on the Downtown Eastside. Soon, addicts may be able to get their daily dose from vending machines.

Yet, the number of the dead hasn’t decreased, it’s only plateaued.

Also unchanged are the characteristics of the majority who died. Men aged 30 to 59 made up 80 per cent of the dead. Of those who died, 86 per cent were at home alone. Four out of every five had contact with the health care system within a year of their deaths, with 45 per cent reporting having pain. Of those dead men, 44 per cent were employed in the trades, transport or service industries.

But Vancouver is unique. It has the highest rate of overdose deaths and those deaths are concentrated in the Downtown Eastside in the low-barrier shelters, supportive housing units and SRO rooming houses that exist cheek-by-jowl with supervised injection sites, naloxone stations and testing sites.

Heading into the fourth year of a public health emergency, politicians need to set a new course.

The course that Dr. Bonnie Henry, B.C.’s chief medical health officer, plans to recommend is even more harm reduction. She said it will include “de facto decriminalization,” more pharmaceutical grade heroin, more drug testing sites, more Suboxone, more naloxone, more supervised injection sites.

On Thursday, Henry did admit that her plan will require that she “evaluate it effectively so that there are not unintended consequences.”

Chief among those unintended consequences is that if British Columbia goes it alone, it would be at risk of becoming even more of a magnet for users from across Canada, even from other countries. What drug user, let alone addict, could resist the allure of free, pharmaceutical grade drugs?

There is also a financial risk to going it alone. Last year, British Columbians’ bill for methadone and Suboxone was $90 million. The number of people on the opioid replacement therapy had risen to 22,012 people from 11,377 in 2009 and is predicted to double again by 2020-21.

British Columbians are already paying for more than 300 people who get injectable hydromorphone (pharmaceutical heroin) daily at a cost of approximately $25,000 a person every year and in January, 50 Vancouverites were enrolled in a pilot program where they get it in the cheaper pill form, which they then crush and inject under supervision.


Police speak to a man and woman on East Hastings in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, Thursday, Feb 7, 2019. More people fatally overdosed in British Columbia last year compared with 2017 despite efforts to combat the province’s public health emergency, the coroner says.

JONATHAN HAYWARD /

THE CANADIAN PRESS

While a provincial strategy is needed, the crisis isn’t unique to B.C. From 2016 until June 2018, more than 9,000 Canadians have died of overdoses largely from fentanyl-laced drugs.

The opioid crisis isn’t just a big city problem. According to the Canadian Institute for Health Information, hospitalization rates were 2.5 times higher in small communities of 50,000 to 100,000 compared with Canada’s largest cities.

Across Canada, hospitalization for opioid-related poisoning has risen 27 per cent in the past five years to an average of 17 a day.

While there is no good data on damage suffered by survivors of near-fatal overdoses, it’s estimated that 90 per cent of drug-overdose patients in intensive care have some sort of brain trauma. The trauma ranges from temporary memory loss to complete loss of brain function.


Chief coroner Lisa Lapointe, left, looks on as provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry answers questions during a press conference about the release of the latest provincial statistics by the BC Coroners Service at Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Thursday, February 7, 2019.

CHAD HIPOLITO /

THE CANADIAN PRESS

A comprehensive national plan is required. But it must focus not only on keeping people alive, but on helping them to get healthy.

Decriminalization — as opposed to legalization — might be part of the answer. Certainly, evidence from Portugal, which was the first in the world to decriminalize possession of small amounts of all drugs, indicates that it can be effective.

But Portugal’s success has come only because decriminalization is accompanied by strict enforcement of the amounts that individuals can possess as well as a dissuasion system that provides both a carrot and a stick to get users into treatment.

The opioid crisis is complicated. It’s been fuelled by over-prescription of highly effective pain reducing synthetic opiates, whose manufacturer convinced physicians that it wasn’t addictive.

Those synthetics then made their way to the street and while some users are unaware that their illicit drugs are laced with fentanyl, others go looking for its intense and often fatal high.

So far, staunching the flow of those drugs on to the street has proven to be little more effective than the harm reduction measures aimed at keeping users safe.

For this crisis to abate, there needs to concerted efforts on all fronts by all governments. It won’t be cheap, but then neither is the alternative.

[email protected]

Twitter: @bramham_daphne

Related


Source link

This website uses cookies and asks your personal data to enhance your browsing experience.