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Posts Tagged "BCTV news"

8Sep

VPD ask public for help locating senior with disability

by admin

Vancouver police are asking the public for help locating wheelchair-using senior who was last seen Saturday in the Downtown Eastside.

In a release, the Vancouver Police Department said Garry Molyneux didn’t return to his care facility near West 12th Avenue and Ash Street Saturday night. Police said they are concerned for Molyneux’s safety.

Molyneux was last seen Saturday near the intersection of Main and Hastings streets around 7:30 p.m., police said.

Police said Molyneux is paralyzed from a stroke, adding that he can’t speak and uses a motorized wheelchair. Because of this, police said, he is unable to ask for assistance.

Molyneux requires medication for diabetes and may seem confused or disoriented, police said.

Police described Molyneux as white, with fair skin. He is 5’7″ tall with a medium build, short grey hair and brown eyes, and was last seen wearing blue jogging pants and a long jacket.

Anyone who sees him is asked to call 911 and stay with him until first responders arrive.

27Aug

Human rights complaint dismissed after man with sex addiction banned from yoga studio

by admin

A man who says he has a sex addiction had his human rights complaint dismissed after alleging he was discriminated against when he was banned from a White Rock yoga studio.

According to a BC Human Rights Tribunal application to dismiss, Erik Rutherford said he attended classes at Westcoast Hot Yoga for over 10 years. When he asked for coaching services from one of the studio’s employees who has her own outside business, however, he was turned down. 

Background in the dismissal application says Rutherford had told the coach “he was seeking help with sex addiction,” but the coach said this wasn’t her field of expertise. He also opened up to other staff about his former experiences with addiction.

Rutherford added that he had reached out to the coach “out of trust as she had offered her health coaching business to me as she had male clients from our studio, but admittedly I contacted her partly due to my mental disability as she is an attractive healthy woman.”

After asking for coaching help and telling staff about his addiction background, Rutherford alleges he was discriminated against by staff, saying they looked at him differently, gossiped about him and eventually wouldn’t let him take yoga classes at the studio. 

The yoga studio, however, said their decision to not allow Rutherford to attend classes anymore had nothing to do with his mental health. 

Instead, Westcoast told the tribunal that Rutherford “began phoning, texting and emailing Westcoast staff at all hours, making staff and some clients uncomfortable,” after his coaching request was denied. 

The yoga studio went on to say that the reason he was asked to practice somewhere else was because he didn’t “stop harassing (them) with emails and false accusations against teachers.” The yoga studio even went so far as to speak to police for help. 

Tribunal documents show that, on May 13, 2018, Rutherford sent an email to the yoga studio, stating he had talked to his 12-step advisor about the situation. 

“My main thing is alcohol but only on vacation,” the email said. “My main issue is internet or cyber pornography that is not related to the studio. If I am paying for yoga, kindly tell your instructors to not silently judge.”

The next day, Rutherford attended a yoga class and later that afternoon, got an email response from the studio. 

“I have had some very upset conversations this morning from my staff, in regards to voice messages left late last night and also teachers receiving messages from you late last night,” the email to Rutherford said. 

“On Saturday I did have a lady concerned about you staring constantly in class … it makes people very uncomfortable, and your constant approaching (the coach) at all hours, and sharing your personal issues has made her and some other staff after your message very uncomfortable.”

The email went on to say that Rutherford’s recently purchased class pass would be refunded. 

“Please do not send any further messages to all these parties, or there will need to have the police involved,” the email said. 

The BC Human Rights Tribunal has the authority to apply for a complaint to be dismissed before it goes to a hearing, particularly if the tribunal member feels the complaint doesn’t “warrant the time or expense of a hearing.” In this case, tribunal member Emily Ohler explained she did not think Rutherford’s complaint would succeed. 

Rutherford responded, saying his “disease is spiritual, mental, physical and social and financially void disease with many different facets and can easily display itself in sexual manifestations especially when abstaining from drugs and alcohol.” 

He went on to say he hasn’t “used the dangerous chemicals since early 2003.”

However, when Rutherford spoke to a doctor to get a diagnosis for his mental health issues and submit a letter to the tribunal, the doctor did not supply a diagnosis. Instead, wrote that Rutherford “does not always recognize personal boundaries,” adding that “he was more likely barred because of some behaviour that either annoyed, scared or offended an instructor.”

In her decision, Ohler said she was “reasonably certain” the yoga studio would be able to prove in a hearing “that continuing to allow Mr. Rutherford to practice yoga at its studio in the circumstances would constitute undue hardship.” 

27Aug

Man with sex addiction banned from yoga studio; human rights complaint dismissed

by admin

A man who says he has a sex addiction had his human rights complaint dismissed after alleging he was discriminated against when he was banned from a White Rock yoga studio.

According to a BC Human Rights Tribunal application to dismiss, Erik Rutherford said he attended classes at Westcoast Hot Yoga for over 10 years. When he asked for coaching services from one of the studio’s employees who has her own outside business, however, he was turned down. 

Background in the dismissal application says Rutherford had told the coach “he was seeking help with sex addiction,” but the coach said this wasn’t her field of expertise. He also opened up to other staff about his former experiences with addiction.

Rutherford added that he had reached out to the coach “out of trust as she had offered her health coaching business to me as she had male clients from our studio, but admittedly I contacted her partly due to my mental disability as she is an attractive healthy woman.”

After asking for coaching help and telling staff about his addiction background, Rutherford alleges he was discriminated against by staff, saying they looked at him differently, gossiped about him and eventually wouldn’t let him take yoga classes at the studio. 

The yoga studio, however, said their decision to not allow Rutherford to attend classes anymore had nothing to do with his mental health. 

Instead, Westcoast told the tribunal that Rutherford “began phoning, texting and emailing Westcoast staff at all hours, making staff and some clients uncomfortable,” after his coaching request was denied. 

The yoga studio went on to say that the reason he was asked to practice somewhere else was because he didn’t “stop harassing (them) with emails and false accusations against teachers.” The yoga studio even went so far as to speak to police for help. 

Tribunal documents show that, on May 13, 2018, Rutherford sent an email to the yoga studio, stating he had talked to his 12-step advisor about the situation. 

“My main thing is alcohol but only on vacation,” the email said. “My main issue is internet or cyber pornography that is not related to the studio. If I am paying for yoga, kindly tell your instructors to not silently judge.”

The next day, Rutherford attended a yoga class and later that afternoon, got an email response from the studio. 

“I have had some very upset conversations this morning from my staff, in regards to voice messages left late last night and also teachers receiving messages from you late last night,” the email to Rutherford said. 

“On Saturday I did have a lady concerned about you staring constantly in class … it makes people very uncomfortable, and your constant approaching (the coach) at all hours, and sharing your personal issues has made her and some other staff after your message very uncomfortable.”

The email went on to say that Rutherford’s recently purchased class pass would be refunded. 

“Please do not send any further messages to all these parties, or there will need to have the police involved,” the email said. 

The BC Human Rights Tribunal has the authority to apply for a complaint to be dismissed before it goes to a hearing, particularly if the tribunal member feels the complaint doesn’t “warrant the time or expense of a hearing.” In this case, tribunal member Emily Ohler explained she did not think Rutherford’s complaint would succeed. 

Rutherford responded, saying his “disease is spiritual, mental, physical and social and financially void disease with many different facets and can easily display itself in sexual manifestations especially when abstaining from drugs and alcohol.” 

He went on to say he hasn’t “used the dangerous chemicals since early 2003.”

However, when Rutherford spoke to a doctor to get a diagnosis for his mental health issues and submit a letter to the tribunal, the doctor did not supply a diagnosis. Instead, wrote that Rutherford “does not always recognize personal boundaries,” adding that “he was more likely barred because of some behaviour that either annoyed, scared or offended an instructor.”

In her decision, Ohler said she was “reasonably certain” the yoga studio would be able to prove in a hearing “that continuing to allow Mr. Rutherford to practice yoga at its studio in the circumstances would constitute undue hardship.” 

26Aug

B.C. man accused of putting hidden camera inside winery bathroom

by admin

A Kelowna man has been arrested for allegedly putting a “small camera” inside a staff washroom at a winery.

Kelowna RCMP were called to the business after someone found the camera hidden inside the bathroom. Authorities have not released exactly where the camera was discovered.

Mounties said an employee of the business was arrested and could face possible voyeurism charges.

“Evidence has been seized in relation to this offence and once it has been properly processed, RCMP will be able to determine how many victims may be involved and further charges could be forwarded,” said Const. Lesley Smith.

The CEO of Summerhill Pyramid Winery confirmed to Castanet News the incident happened at their business, adding the “staff member involved is no longer a staff member.”

Ezra Cipes said management did a sweep of the winery to ensure there were no other hidden cameras and the public is not at risk of any danger.

“This happened to us, not by us,” he said. “This has been very hard to deal with.”

Kelowna RCMP said it’s unclear how many people were recorded.

The suspect was released from custody on a promise to appear at an upcoming court date.

21Aug

12th Avenue to reopen as construction wraps ahead of schedule

by admin

A Vancouver construction project at the root of many commuter headaches is ahead of schedule, meaning the road closure will end early, the city says.

A section of East 12th Avenue between Kingsway and Fraser Street has been closed for seven weeks for urgent maintenance.

The city blocked off the area and brought in crews to replace an aging water main following reports of recent leaks.

The pipeline was installed in the early 1900s, the city said on July 3, and was “in critical condition.”

Those who lived in the area were still allowed to get home, but otherwise, use of the east-west commuter route was restricted and parking restrictions were put in place.

But in a statement Wednesday morning, the city announced it would reopen to traffic in just a few hours.

Officials said city crews also took advantage of the closure to make other improvements to the impacted four blocks of 12th.

Accessibility and safety upgrades were made to the sidewalks, and a new curb bulge was installed at the St. George intersection to reduce the crossing distance for kids who walk to school.

The road surface was also fully repaved.

The city thanked businesses and commuters for their patience during construction.

3Aug

Delta boy with health challenges unable to find round-the-clock care

by admin

When she thinks about the toll a lack of nursing resources is having on her family, Stephanie Hill Davie is overcome with emotion.

Her son, Owen, requires round-the-clock care. He is diagnosed with CHARGE syndrome and Kabuki syndrome, two rare genetic conditions that prevent him eating or sitting up on his own.

“Owen has no muscle tone, so he needs constant supervision because he can easily roll off of devices,” Hill Davie said. “I’ve done simple things like go to the washroom and have come back and he’s choked, vomitted and blue, and he needs resuscitation immediately.”

She said Owen has qualified for 168 hours a week of nursing services but starting last fall, those hours have been dwindling.  Since April, those hours have dropped for 56 a week.

She’s now at her wits’ end.

She has been in touch with the nursing support services’ coordinator and the nursing agency. She has also reached out to the province’s patient quality care review board, an ombudsperson, local MLA, the B.C. health minister, the province’s premier and even the prime minister, even though she knows health care doesn’t fall under the federal government.

“It’s all over the news that there’s a nursing shortage within British Columbia,” Hill Davie said. “Why isn’t the health minister looking at the programs that he already has in place to help families? And why he hasn’t recognized that there’s a crisis for a lot of families?”

According to the BC Nurses’ Union, upwards of 25,000 nurses are needed to staff the province’s health care system over the next 10 years. The number includes new nurse positions and replacement of retiring nurses.

In an emailed statement, the Ministry of Health told CTV News, “Our government is committed to providing children and youth with complex needs the healthcare services they need to live in their home and community.”

“While we cannot speak to individual patient cases, the ministry and Provincial Health Services Authority are aware of this patient and a nursing support services program coordinator is working with the family and his health care team to support him,” the ministry said.

Hill Davie said if the family does not receive the nursing support they need, she and her husband will have to take on the role as Owen’s care taker.

“It’s forcing my husband and I into caregiver burnout,” she said. “All three of my kids deserve a mom. They don’t deserve one person providing care to one child.”

With files from CTV Vancouver’s Jazz Sanghera

31Jul

Police trying to ID 2 people following attack on man in wheelchair

by admin

Weeks after a man in a wheelchair was attacked in East Vancouver, police have released surveillance images of two people investigators believe might have information on the crime.

The victim was assaulted on the morning of July 7, in the underground parking lot of an apartment building on Cecil Street. Authorities said the attack left the 44-year-old in serious condition in hospital.

On Wednesday, the Vancouver Police Department shared images of a man and woman that were captured on a CCTV camera in the area, and asked anyone with information on their identities to come forward.

“The VPD believes the two individuals in the photos, a man and a woman, may have information about this assault. We are hopeful that the public can assist us in identifying the pair,” Sgt. Jason Robillard said in a statement.

Authorities have not described either of the people in the images as suspects in the attack.

The man is believed to be white, with a slim build and blonde hair. He was wearing a denim jacket, a shirt with a large “O” on the front, black shorts, black flip-flops and a black baseball hat.

The woman is also believed to be white, with a medium build and shaggy orange or blonde hair. She was seen wearing black cropped top, a red jacket, green camouflage-print Capri pants and sandals.

Police urged anyone with information that could help investigators solve the disturbing attack to contact the department’s Major Crime Section at 604-717-2541.

assault motorized wheelchair

31Jul

Security images released amid spike in residential break-ins in West Van

by admin

Police in West Vancouver say they’re investigating a recent spike in residential break-ins.

In a statement, the force said there were 29 reported break and enters in the district between July 1 and 30, bringing the total to 108 so far this year. According to police, that’s a 65-per-cent increase compared to the five-year average.

“Officers are actively investigating these incidents and utilizing numerous resources including Forensic Investigators, our Major Investigations Team and Criminal Intelligence Officers, to identify any potential suspects,” police said. “So far, investigators have secured CCTV footage from multiple locations that shows suspects wearing hoods and gloves.”

Police also released a map showing where in the district the break-ins occurred.

Investigators said stolen items include jewelry, electronic devices, sports equipment and other types of property.

In the meantime, the WVPD is urging residents to take precautions as police investigate.

Tips include locking doors and closing windows when no one is home, ensuring your home alarm is working properly and making sure notification agreements are up to date with alarm companies.

Residents are also advised to avoid leaving easily accessible ladders on their property, making sure their home as adequate exterior lighting and letting a neighbour a neighbour know if they’re going to be away for an extended period of time.

“The people responsible for these break and enters are looking for items of high value, and seem to be targeting homes that appear unoccupied at the time,” said Const. Kevin Goodmurphy. “We want to remind our residents that if they see or hear suspicious activity, to contact us immediately.”

Anyone who can help identify the suspects seen in the video or has other information that could advance the investigation is asked to contact West Vancouver police at 604-925-7300. Tips can be left anonymously through Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.


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19Jul

Man, dog broke into a Fortis BC facility, Mounties allege

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Mounties on the Sunshine Coast are asking for the public’s help to identify a suspect they say broke into a Fortis BC facility.

According to the RCMP, a man entered the location on Port Mellon Highway in Gibsons by digging a hole under a fence.

Security camera footage released by police shows the suspect and a dog that appears to be accompanying him in the facility.

Investigators said two brand new Honda EU2000I generators were taken during the break-in.

Anyone with information about the incident is asked to contact Mounties at 604-885-2266 or Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-222-8477.


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18Jul

Blind man with guide dog denied service, arrested at Kamloops gas station

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A man who’s blind was told his guide dog wasn’t allowed inside a Kamloops gas station, and when RCMP arrived, he thought they would defend his rights, but instead, the officers put him in handcuffs.

“I was very shocked and appalled,” said Ben Fulton. “I was just really surprised at how quickly it spiraled out of control.”

The Toronto man was on a road trip to celebrate after graduating law school, but things took a turn when he made a pit stop at the Shell gas station on the Trans-Canada Highway around 11:30 p.m. on June 16.

All Fulton can see is a grey blur since losing his vision to a rare disorder called retinitis pigmentosa two years ago. He relies on his guide dog, Abbie, to be his eyes.

He said the gas station clerk was adamant his manager gave him “strict instructions” that pets were not allowed.

He said when he tried to show the guide dog identification card and explain that Abbie is not a pet, but rather a working dog, the clerk did not change his position.

“When I was showing him the card, he didn’t want to look at the card. He didn’t want to hear what I was saying about Abbie being a guide dog. He didn’t seem to understand the law,” Fulton said.

“He asked me if I wanted him to call the cops I responded by saying that I would love it if he called the cops. I was expecting them to show up and enforce the law.”
 

Fulton handcuffed and put in police cruiser

Kamloops RCMP said they received a call about a man and woman who were yelling and threatening the clerk.

“When the officers attended at first, they noticed the man and woman. The dog was off to the side and behind them; they didn’t even notice the dog, they were focused on the man and woman,” said spokesperson Cpl. Jodi Shelkie.

Shelkie said the two officers asked Fulton and his friend to step outside because there were other customers inside the store, and when they refused, Fulton was arrested.

“The man and woman began yelling at them and the man was unco-operative. So to prevent continuation of the offence, the officers arrested the male and took him outside,” she said.

Fulton denied he was confrontational, maintaining that he was speaking calmly and he had simply wanted to show the officers his guide dog identification card.

“I was very calmly standing at the counter when they came in. I wasn’t yelling, I wasn’t saying anything,” he said. “The female officer asked me, ‘Why don’t we go outside and talk about this?’ So, I answered her question and I said, ‘I don’t want to go outside because I’m standing at the counter trying to get service.'”

Soon after, the other officer stepped in and put him in handcuffs and he was told he was being arrested for mischief.

He said he was overcome with fear when they placed him in the back of the cruiser.
 

‘Deficiency’ in RCMP training: Fulton

Kamloops RCMP defended the actions of the officers, saying protocols were followed.

“We have a lot of diversity training both for accessibility, cultural and racial situation and we deal with these on an ongoing basis. In this situation, as soon as they found out he’s blind, they removed him from handcuffs and he went on his way without charges. In this situation, the training very much worked,” said Shelkie.

Fulton believes the situation clearly demonstrates a lack in training because the officers were not able to recognize immediately that Abbie is a guide dog.

“I really think they should have known that I was blind just by seeing me by my guide dog. They should’ve known that she’s a guide dog by the fact that she’s wearing a harness. The fact that they weren’t able to identify that shows a deficiency in their training,” he said.

The CEO of B.C. Guide Dogs believes the Mounties unnecessarily escalated the situation.

“To put a person who has a guide dog in a police cruiser is just beyond my comprehension. I can’t understand how that would be the first step taken by a police officer. It’s atrocious,” said Bill Thornton.

He said when Fulton offered the officers his guide dog identification card, they should’ve taken a look at it.

“We’ve had guide dogs and service dogs in Canada for such a long time. It’s very disappointing to hear this type of event taking place.”

According to the B.C. Guide Dog and Service Dog Act, a guide and service dog is allowed to enter and use any place where the public is invited or has access to.

A Shell Canada spokesperson said they are working to understand what happened in the situation.

“Sales associates are expected to treat all customers with care and respect…We have reached out to the independent retailer who operates this site, along with the local RCMP, to further understand this incident,” said spokesperson Kristen Schmidt.

To prevent a similar situation from happening to anyone else, Fulton is in the process of filing a complaint with the BC Human Rights Tribunal.

“It’s the best venue for having human rights enforced in the province. It’s important for me to not let this go unnoticed – for it to be swept under the rug,” Fulton said.


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