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Posts Tagged "burnaby"

10Oct

Man carrying long gun forces lockdown at New West hospital

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Police are looking for a suspect who triggered a lockdown at a New Westminster hospital Tuesday after he was seen carrying a long gun.

Officers were first dispatched to the area of Royal Columbian Hospital at around 10:20 p.m. after they received reports from the nearby Sapperton Station about a man with a rifle. Investigators say they also received information that the man was trying to sell the firearm.

In a statement released Wednesday, the New Westminster Police Department confirmed the suspect had entered the hospital near the underground parking garage.

The incident prompted a large police response which included Transit Police and Mounties from Coquitlam and Surrey.

Royal Columbian was placed on lockdown and authorities set up a containment area around the scene.

“An extensive search of the hospital and surrounding parking garages was conducted to ensure the safety of staff and patients, however the male was not located,” the release read. “CCTV footage has been obtained for closer analysis.”

Now, police are asking anyone with information that could help them locate the man to come forward.

“Our investigation into this incident continues,” Sgt. Jeff Scott said. “It’s with good reason that the safe transportation of firearms is a matter we take very seriously.”

Investigators working on the case can be reached at 604-525-5411.


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8Oct

Woman says she was followed, asked for money before alleged bus assault

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A woman who says she was attacked on a transit bus in Vancouver says she’d been followed and asked for money before the violent outburst which was partially caught on camera.

The woman, who did not want to be publicly identified, said she got on the bus shortly before 2 a.m. Thursday on Granville Street near Davie.

She said a man had asked her for money, then appeared to be following her before she boarded. She said she told the bus driver she felt unsafe as she got on.

The man then boarded the bus without paying, and eventually accosted her, she told CTV News.

The woman pulled out her phone and recorded part of the incident, in which a man can be seen stumbling and asking the woman for money.

She’s heard telling him she has nothing for him. He then swears at her and gets off the bus, slamming his hand against the window where the woman was sitting once outside.

He is then seen running back onto the bus and yelling obscenities at her.

“You’re going to jail,” she tells him.

Police say the man tried to grab her phone and she was assaulted. She was not physically harmed, and the suspect left the scene before investigators arrived.

Other transit users told CTV there are times they’ve felt unsafe as well.

“Nighttime transit makes me feel a little questionable about my safety just because there’s a lot of people who are rather in a state unable to drive or just looking for a place to be,” one person said.

Another said they’ve purposely sat near the driver or moved seats during incidents on the bus.

In this case, police say they’re reviewing security camera footage as part of their investigation.

With a report from CTV Vancouver’s Maria Weisgarber


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8Oct

Survivors of Woodlands asylum receive compensation for abuse

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The province says former residents of a former asylum have started to receive compensation for the abuse they suffered.

In a statement, the Ministry of Health announced those who attended Woodlands prior to 1974 will each receive $10,000 in an ex-gratia payment.

Those who lived at the facility in the years that followed will receive payments up to a maximum of $10,000. The payments will take into account any previous settlements awarded through lawsuits.

Survivors should expect to receive the money by the end of March 2019, the Ministry of Health said.

Woodlands operated in New Westminster for more than a century, initially opened in 1878 as the Provincial Asylum for the Insane.

The facility was later renamed the Provincial Hospital for the Insane, then the name changed to Woodlands School in 1950, according to a brief history from the ministry. In 1974, it was renamed simply as Woodlands.

“Although the asylum was originally presented as a modern approach to treating ‘lunatics’ and the ‘feebleminded,’ it was soon criticized as gloomy and unfit for its purpose of caring for people today referred to as having psychiatric disabilities and intellectual disabilities,” Inclusion BC says on its website.

The facility which once housed as many as 1,400 residents was closed in 1996. In response of allegations to abuse, the province commissioned an independent review of patients’ treatment during their residency. The report, made public 16 years ago, announced the investigator found evidence of physical, emotional and sexual abuse.

A class action lawsuit was also launched in 2002, and a settlement approved in 2010. However, the lawsuit excluded those who’d been discharged before August 1974.

“Finally, after all these years of being told no, our province is saying yes to the survivors of Woodlands,” former executive director of Disability Alliance BC Jane Dyson said in a statement.

“We need to ensure that as many survivors as possible know that their pain and struggle has been acknowledged and their voices listened to.”

Former patient Bill McArthur is one of dozens receiving payment. The survivors’ advocate said in the ministry’s statement that he felt a sense of closure from the announcemnet.

“This vindication, I hope, will allow (survivors) to live the rest of their lives with a sense of self respect and dignity,” he said.

Last month, the province reached out to 314 former residents of Woodlands. It asks anyone who has not been contacted to call 1-888-523-7192 or to reach out through email.

Former residents are asked to provide their full name, date of birth, address and contact information for their legal guardian if they have one.


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7Oct

Woman records video of a man attacking her on a bus

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Mychaylo Prystupa, CTV Vancouver


Published Sunday, October 7, 2018 4:47PM PDT


Last Updated Sunday, October 7, 2018 4:48PM PDT

Vancouver police are investigating the nighttime downtown assault of a woman on a Translink bus who recorded video of a man attacking her, who apparently took offence to being filmed.

The cellphone video, now posted to Youtube, shows a bus driver returning from the man who was seated at the back. The public bus was stopped on Granville Street near Davie Street around 2 a.m. on Thursday. The man is slouching and then he slowly stands up, pulls up his pants and stumbles to the front of the bus.

“Do you have a few bucks?” he asks the woman making a video of him.

“No, I have nothing for you,” she responds.

He then swears at her and then gets off the bus. From outside, he slams his hand hard against the window where the woman was sitting and runs back on to the bus aggressively to yell obscenities at her once again.

“You’re going to jail,” she replies.

A commotion ensues and the cellphone drops.  She screams, “Help me!”

Sgt. Jason Robillard of the Vancouver Police Department said in a statement to CTV News, “The suspect tried to forcefully grab the complainant’s phone and assaulted her in the process. The complainant retained her phone and was not injured.”

“The suspect left the scene and was not identified. Investigators are reviewing further CCTV footage and the investigation remains on-going,” the officer added.


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7Oct

Woman records video of a man acting aggressively towards her on a bus

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Mychaylo Prystupa, CTV Vancouver


Published Sunday, October 7, 2018 4:47PM PDT


Last Updated Sunday, October 7, 2018 4:48PM PDT

Vancouver police are trying to identify a man who allegedly attacked a bus passenger during a violent outburst that was caught on camera this week.

The cellphone video, now posted to YouTube, shows a bus driver returning from the man who was seated at the back of the bus. The public transit vehicle was stopped on Granville Street near Davie Street around 2 a.m. on Thursday. The man is slouching and then he slowly stands up, pulls up his pants and stumbles to the front of the bus.

“Do you have a few bucks?” he asks the woman making a video of him.

“No, I have nothing for you,” she responds.

He then swears at her and then gets off the bus. From outside, he slams his hand hard against the window where the woman was sitting and runs back on to the bus aggressively to yell obscenities at her once again.

“You’re going to jail,” she replies.

A commotion ensues and the cellphone drops.  She screams, “Help me!”

Sgt. Jason Robillard of the Vancouver Police Department said in a statement to CTV News, “The suspect tried to forcefully grab the complainant’s phone and assaulted her in the process. The complainant retained her phone and was not injured.”

“The suspect left the scene and was not identified. Investigators are reviewing further CCTV footage and the investigation remains on-going,” the officer added.


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6Oct

Vancouver candidate pushes for diaper change tables in all washrooms

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One Vancouver city council candidate is pushing for changes at city hall.

Specifically, diaper changes – and change tables that are accessible to both women and men in all public facilities, so there’s nothing stopping a dad from doing it.

“Dads change, grandparents change, everybody changes diapers,” Independent Vancouver city council candidate Erin Shum told CTV News. “We need to make it available to everyone.”

Shum is a new mom to four-month-old Abigail, and says facilities vary. There are diaper change tables in almost all women’s washrooms in publically accessible buildings. But as for men’s washrooms? It depends.

“My husband and I always struggle when we’re out. Who’s going to change her diaper?” she said.

Shum, who is currently a park board commissioner, introduced a motion to add change tables to all gender and accessible washrooms in Park Board buildings, such as community centres. It passed unanimously last week.

Now she says that’s something she wants to see in all public buildings in Vancouver.

The motion was inspired by Barack Obama’s BABIES Act, which put change tables in the bathrooms of every publically accessible U.S. federal building.

As roles shift and dads do more parenting across North America, a variety of buildings have been under more pressure to provide tools for them too.

In Florida last week, a man’s photo of himself squatting on the bathroom floor and changing a diaper with his baby in his lap was shared widely on Instagram with the hashtag #squatforchange.

“We do exist, and we are willing to do more than provide and protect,” said Donte Palmer.

In Quebec earlier this year, another man pressured Tim Hortons to equip its bathrooms too – and the chain agreed.

The motion seems to have support from a wide spectrum of city parties. Vision Vancouver’s Catherine Evans, also a park board commissioner looking to be on city council, said things had changed a lot since she was changing diapers in the 1980s.

“It has a lot to do with women’s equality,” she said. Then, facilities were hard to find even for women, because of the assumption they would be more often at home, caring for children. Putting change tables in women’s washrooms was a big step – but now more facilities should have men’s tables too, she said.

“There’s an assumption there. It’s time we caught up. It was the reality but it’s not the reality anymore,” she said.

CTV News found that some park board buildings, like Trout Lake Community Centre, had a change table in the men’s washroom. But at Renfrew Community Centre, it wasn’t there.

NPA park board commissioner turned council candidate Sarah Kirby Yung said the park board had found 96 change tables in park board buildings. She said there is a place to change a child in every building, but it may not be accessible to everyone.

“Some of the gaps are in the older facilities,” she said. “As we’re moving towards universal washrooms, we’re putting those in.”

Some city bathrooms have already been upgraded, and the city’s downtown library has a parenting room.

OneCity candidate Christine Boyle said she supported the idea – and said parents had also raised the issue of accessible bathrooms in transit hubs as well.

“It matters a lot to be looking at how we make Vancouver more family friendly at all levels,” she said.

Each change table is about $400, Shum said.

“Everything we can do to help includes something as simple and practical and affordable like change tables,” she said.

Shum hopes the next time Abigail needs a change, it could be just as easy for her dad to do it. 


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24Sep

Sketch shows man seen masturbating in UBC women’s washroom

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Mounties at the University of British Columbia have released a sketch of a man who allegedly exposed himself in a women’s washroom earlier this month.

According to police, a woman at a residence in the Lower Mall heard a man speaking to her while she was taking a shower on the evening of Sept. 14.

A second witness walked into the washroom and saw the man, who was allegedly naked and masturbating.

The suspect fled the scene on foot and police have not been able to locate him.

He is described as South Asian or Middle Eastern and is in his 30s or early 40s. He is between 5-7 and 5-8 with an average build and has hair that’s dark on the sides and lighter on top. The suspect was wearing a light-coloured hoodie or long-sleeved shirt, grey sweatpants and a small diamond or crystal earring at the time of the incident.

Anyone who can identify the man in the sketch is asked to contact investigators at 604-224-1322 or Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-222-8477.

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19Sep

Passenger satisfaction at YVR highest among Canada’s largest airports: survey

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TORONTO – A J.D. Power survey says passenger satisfaction has improved in two years at Canada’s three largest airports.

Vancouver International’s score rose five points to 781 on a 1,000-point scale that measured satisfaction with check-in; food, beverage and retail; accessibility; terminal facilities and baggage claim.

Montreal’s Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport scored 774, up from 760 in 2016.

Toronto’s Pearson International Airport received 761 points, up from 745 two years ago. Calgary’s score was unchanged at 756.

Overall airport satisfaction at North America’s 64 largest airports reached a record high of 761 points, 12 points higher than in 2017 and 30 points above 2016 when Canadian airports were last measured.

Increased scores are primarily driven by higher satisfaction with food, beverage, retail and security checks.

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19Sep

Passenger satisfaction at YVR highest among largest airports: survey

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TORONTO – A J.D. Power survey says passenger satisfaction has improved in two years at Canada’s three largest airports.

Vancouver International’s score rose five points to 781 on a 1,000-point scale that measured satisfaction with check-in; food, beverage and retail; accessibility; terminal facilities and baggage claim.

Montreal’s Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport scored 774, up from 760 in 2016.

Toronto’s Pearson International Airport received 761 points, up from 745 two years ago. Calgary’s score was unchanged at 756.

Overall airport satisfaction at North America’s 64 largest airports reached a record high of 761 points, 12 points higher than in 2017 and 30 points above 2016 when Canadian airports were last measured.

Increased scores are primarily driven by higher satisfaction with food, beverage, retail and security checks.

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18Sep

Should B.C. have a ‘Silver Alert’ system for missing seniors?

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Kendra Mangione , CTV Vancouver


Published Tuesday, September 18, 2018 3:15PM PDT


Last Updated Tuesday, September 18, 2018 3:18PM PDT

A local man is continuing his push for a province-wide “Silver Alert” system five years after his father walked away, never to be seen again.

On the anniversary of the disappearance of Shin Noh, his son Sam is again calling for a program that would notify media and the public when a senior with Alzheimer’s or dementia wanders off.

The system he advocates for is similar to Amber Alerts sent out when children are missing.

While the program has yet to be officially implemented, a citizen-created alert system has been developed and is operating on social media.

A website set up by Sam Noh and other volunteers collects donations and raise awareness said the notifications are also sent out if a person has a developmental disability, autism or cognitive defect and has been determined to be at risk of harm because of their condition.

They are sent if the subject has been determined to be a missing person by police and has been gone less than 72 hours.

For now, alerts are only sent out for those missing in B.C.’s Lower Mainland, but the organizers intend to expand to the rest of the province in the future. They will only be sent in cases when public assistance could be critical in saving them from harm, the website said.

The BC Silver Alert system is based on software that scans feeds of local police forces for specific keywords. The software will flag the content and a volunteer will review it, post it online and send out an alert.

Noh said early notification can be crucial, as typically missing Alzheimer’s patients are found by members of the public.

“With an official Silver Alert program we can utilize better technology to quickly spread that word – highway billboard signs, media – but without even the Silver Alert there’s still other tools that we have in our community,” Noh said.

“With the City of Vancouver you can sign up for alerts to receive notification about garbage day pickup. So we have this technology. I would like for us to utilize it.”

BC Silver Alert co-founder and Coquitlam Search and Rescue search manager Michael Coyle said people with dementia are often found on the bus when it goes out of service, or when a restaurant closes, or in other similar situations. They’re rarely located by SAR groups, though officials are active and hopeful during their search efforts.

The cases where the missing person isn’t found stick with them, Coyle said.

“All SAR members I know have a list of names they remember, the people that they didn’t find, and for most of the rest of our lives, when someone finds remains in some location, mentally we’re going through our check list,” he said.

Shin Ik Noh
Shin Noh, a 64-year-old former pastor from Coquitlam, B.C., went missing in September 2013 and has never been found.

Pointing to legislation in other provinces in Canada, those behind BC Silver Alert say they want the notifications to be included in a system tested in B.C. in the spring called Alert Ready. The system sends text messages to smartphone users in event of tsunamis, but will later be expanded to include floods and fire warnings, the province’s public safety minister said.

There is an app being tested in other provinces called Community ASAP which could also have potential to notify residents of a specific area, and to allow them to report sightings to local authorities. Coyle said it will be tested locally in October.

The search for Shin Noh

Noh recalled the day his father disappeared, describing the experience of driving around to Shin’s usual spots as “surreal.”

The longer he searched, the more urgency he felt.

His family called the Coquitlam RCMP, and relatives, friends and neighbours combed the areas where they thought he may be.

“I’m truly grateful, but we sort of felt like we were still alone, that we had to come up with all these search and rescue strategies, so it was frustrating at that time,” he said.

“The search progressed very slowly.”

Coyle was involved in the search for Shin five years ago, and has helped search for several others in similar situations. He said every time SAR groups are alerted to a missing person with Alzheimer’s or dementia, they begin with a similar discussion about where to look.

“In an urban environment, there are just so many places where someone could go. People don’t notice the missing person, they don’t look unusual, they’re just walking along, they won’t be asking for help,” Coyle said.

“Normally for search and rescue we end up looking where people don’t go, in case the person gets stuck or trapped, which happens. So we end up in urban wilderness trails and things like that.”

With Shin’s case specifically, he said he remembers they didn’t have a direction of travel. They knew he walked a route every day, but at any point he may have missed a turn.

“Also because of how long it had been since he’d gone missing, our search area was quite big. He could have walked for hours in any direction.”

But because members of the public are statistically more likely to find missing persons with conditions such as dementia, Coyle said he felt frustrated that there was no system to alert the public early on.

Tips poured in, and there were confirmed sightings of his father, Noh said, but the family didn’t know about them for three days.

“I think if we had the Silver Alert or something similar… we may have been able to follow up with it a lot quicker and he may be home with us today,” Noh said.

Five years later, he said he’s surprised they never found his father’s remains, and that it’s hard not to have been able to give Shin a proper burial.

“I want our community to utilize technology to help current families that are dealing with this and to help future families, because the whole goal is I want to save them the devastation and the grief of what we went through.”

With files from CTV Vancouver’s Shannon Paterson 

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