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Posts Tagged "denies"

30Aug

‘I am almost not a person’: ICBC denies photo ID to Richmond woman over middle initial | CBC News

by admin

Nyoka Campbell has been a Canadian citizen for more than a decade, but her ongoing struggle to secure a B.C. photo ID has left her feeling like an outsider.

The 29-year-old has spent much of her life on the move, immigrating to Canada from Jamaica when she was just a child. Now living in the Lower Mainland, she has two primary pieces of ID to her name: a Canadian passport and a B.C. services card without a photo.

The two cards would usually be enough for someone to qualify for a B.C. photo identification card. But a small discrepancy between her documents — her passport includes her middle initial, while her care card does not — has kept ICBC from issuing her a card.

ICBC is the provincial Crown corporation that insures cars and is also responsible for issuing B.C. ID cards.

“I feel like I am almost not a person because of the way they’ve treated me.” Campbell told CBC News from her Richmond home.

“I am Canadian, I am a citizen of the Province of British Columbia, and I feel that I am entitled to be able to identify myself,” she added.

ICBC confirmed with CBC News that the documents she’s provided are insufficient for a photo identification card.

“In this case, while we sympathize with Ms. Campbell, we’ve reviewed the provided documents and unfortunately, they do not meet the requirements,” spokesperson Lindsay Wilkins said in an e-mailed statement.

Campbell says she now needs to obtain a citizenship certificate in order to clear up her ID troubles, but she can’t afford it.

Nyoka Campbell says a small discrepancy between two government-issued IDs has kept ICBC from issuing her a photo ID card. (Maggie MacPherson/CBC)

A prolonged dispute

Campbell moved to Vancouver in 2015. She says she was issued a provincial care card which by default did not include her middle initial.

“I didn’t choose the way my name was presented on the [services card], it was just generated by Health Insurance B.C.” said Campbell.

She doesn’t have her Jamaican birth certificate, and her Canadian citizenship card was stolen along with her wallet several years ago.

When she sought out a photo ID from ICBC in 2016 using what documents she had left, she was denied by staff. She claims her account has been red flagged by staff as potentially fraudulent due to the discrepancy between her passport and services card.

She’s kept pursuing the ID ever since, providing the insurance provider with mail, her SIN card, her son’s birth certificate and bank statements, but says it hasn’t swayed ICBC’s position.

“We do look at customer’s situations on a case-by-case basis, but it is more difficult in cases where there isn’t a verified photo record in our database,” said ICBC’s spokesperson.

ICBC says it looks at customers’ situations on a case-by-case basis, but it is more difficult in cases when there isn’t a verified photo record in its database. (David Horemans/CBC)

Hard times

The Canadian government no longer issues citizenship cards, but Campbell has been advised to apply for a citizenship certificate — a commemorative slip of paper that doesn’t qualify as identification but would confirm her citizenship. She could use it at the ICBC office. It can take up to five months before a certificate arrives.

However, the document requires a primary piece of photo ID. The only photo ID Campbell has — her passport — is now expired. She says doesn’t have sufficient documents to renew it.

And even if she could, Campbell, a single mother living off disability payments, says she would have trouble finding the money — about $200 in total — to retrieve both documents.

“I get about $1,500 per month … [my rent is] $1,248 plus my utilities, plus my insurance — and I also have my eight year old,” said Campbell.

She wonders just how long it will be before she has an official photo ID to her name — a circumstance she says is particularly troubling because it prevents her from boarding an airplane. Her grandmother, who lives in Ontario, is struggling with kidney failure.

“At any moment I could need to go to Ontario, but I’m not able to,” she said.

3Jan

Vancouver Coastal Health denies allegations made after toddler death

by admin


16-month-old Macallan Wayne Saini died Jan. 18, 2017 in an accident at a daycare in Vancouver.


Submitted / Vancouver Sun

Vancouver Coastal Health says it did nothing to contribute to the death of a 16-month-old boy at an unlicensed daycare, calling what happened a “tragic incident” in its response to a civil lawsuit launched by the boy’s parents.

The health authority filed its response to the statement of claim in B.C. Supreme Court in early December.

Macallan (Mac) Saini, was found dead in the Olive Branch Daycare in east Vancouver on Jan. 18, 2017.

The lawsuit filed by the toddler’s mother, Shelley Sheppard, alleges he choked on an electrical cord and died because he was left alone.

Documents filed with the court also allege the daycare was “overcrowded” and that the health authority and Ministry of Children and Family Development did not warn parents or close the facility, despite “multiple complaints” of overcrowding or operating without a licence.

None of the allegations has been proven in court.

The ministry, daycare operator Yasmine Saad and the landlords of the home where the daycare operated are also named as defendants in the lawsuit, but none has submitted a response with the court to the statement of claim.

In its response, Vancouver Coastal Health says it had no knowledge that Saad was running an unlicensed daycare and no complaint had been received about it from any parents.

The health authority’s response “denies that it owed any … duty of care to the plaintiff and her deceased son, Mac Saini,” and it also seeks dismissal of the claims against it, with costs.

Sheppard’s suit says complaints against Saad were investigated in 2010, 2011, 2012, 2015, and in 2016, and the lawsuit asserts the health authority identified her as a “moderate risk to health and safety.” It says Saad was never fined and no steps were taken to prevent the daycare from continuing operations.

But the health authority says four complaints of too many children in care, all involving different addresses, were investigated against Saad over seven years and each was “dealt with by the licensing officers in exercise of their discretionary powers.”

The response makes no mention of the original lawsuit’s claim that Vancouver Coastal Health allegedly identified Saad as a “moderate” health and safety risk.

It also disputes Sheppard’s allegation that the health authority violated baby Mac’s charter right to life and security of the person, saying there is no legal standing for a charter argument.

When the lawsuit was filed, the Ministry of Children and Family Development said it could not comment because the matter was before the courts but added that its legal counsel would review the lawsuit and “respond accordingly to the court.”

“The death of a child is a tragedy no parent should ever face, and our heartfelt condolences go out to the parents,” the ministry said in an emailed statement.

The statement of claim accuses the landlords of allowing Saad to operate a daycare without a licence, failing to supervise operations and failing to ensure the premises were safe and suitable for an infant.

One of the property owners said at the time she was unaware her tenant was operating a daycare on the premises when she rented it to her and declined further comment. A second landlord and Saad could not be reached for comment.

As a result of the death, Sheppard claims she has experienced ongoing trauma and health problems, suffering permanent disability, loss of earnings and loss of enjoyment of life.

The health authority asks for proof of Sheppard’s claims in its response to the court, saying it “denies the plaintiff suffered or will suffer in the future, the injuries, loss, damage, or expense as alleged, or at all.”


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