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Posts Tagged "major"

20Sep

BC Ferries wants public input on major Horseshoe Bay terminal overhaul

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BC Ferries is in the early stages of redeveloping its decades-old Horseshoe Bay terminal and is now seeking public feedback.

The terminal, which services routes between Vancouver Island, the Sunshine Coast and Bowen Island, hasn’t gone through significant upgrades since the 1960s. Over years of growth, small changes and add-ons have tried to accommodate an increase in travellers, but BC Ferries says the terminal is at capacity. 

“The Horseshoe Bay terminal plays a significant role in connecting communities and customers,” said Mark Wilson, vice president of strategy and community engagement, in a news release. 

“This makes it a good time to get more detailed input on how we improve the terminal to meet the community’s future growth and emerging needs.”

Last May, BC Ferries surveyed 1,500 people to get feedback on what they’d like to see in the redevelopment. Themes that came out of that process included efficiency, accessibility and integrating the village. Some design concepts were developed from that feedback. 

“We’ve developed these draft concepts with what we heard, and now we want to further define them with more input from the community,” Wilson said. 

As part of its process and based on that initial feedback, BC Ferries has created a “visual profile” that will be used in future designs. For example, several images are included to “reflect the kind of narrative you would like the design of the terminal to tell,” such as a West Coast shore, present ferry terminal and a seal. 

Some of the changes proposed include a second exit road, a new waiting area for foot passengers, a transportation hub and another storey being added to the terminal building.

From now until Oct. 13, anyone can give feedback online. There is also a community engagement event scheduled on Oct. 7 from 4 to 8 p.m. at the Gleneagles Golf Course in West Vancouver.

The engagement process is part of a long-term, 25-year plan for the terminal and construction likely wouldn’t begin until the mid-2020s.  

11Sep

Vancouver passes a culture plan for the next decade — with no major increase in funding | CBC News

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The City of Vancouver has passed a new arts and culture plan for the next 10 years that is bold in ambition, if not in funding. 

Entitled “Culture | Shift,” the plan aims for “blanketing the city in arts and culture” and prioritizes affordable and accessible spaces, cultural equity, accessibility, reconciliation and decolonization. 

The full report can be read here

But while there are dozens of recommendations in the report, the amount of additional money budgeted over the next four years is just $3.2 million and would leave cultural service funding as a smaller percentage of the city’s budget in 2023 than it was in 2010. 

“It seems like not a like a lot of money to me,” said Vancouver Coun. Adrianne Carr, who nonetheless voted in favour. “Is the amount of money being recommended sufficient?”

Cross-collaboration

Jessica Wadsworth, co-chair of the Vancouver Arts and Culture Advisory Committee, said “we wanted to make a reasonable request, but certainly we can ask for more.” 

The City of Vancouver wants to add 800,000 square feet of new cultural spaces over the next 10 years. (Boombox)

However, she applauded the overall plan — which came after months of consultation with hundreds of artistic groups — and said the lack of major funding increases was mitigated by the city’s commitment to move more efficiently across different departments. 

“The collaboration with urban planning, with people that do business with real estate and development … I think that collaboration is worth more than the dollars,” she said.  

The city hopes to build 800,000 square feet of cultural space in the next decade, including 400 spaces that double as housing. In addition, the report calls for a a music task force, as well a hired person within city hall to lead its music strategy.

But the committee was equally as excited around the decolonization and equity recommendations, which included developing Indigenous grant programs and increasing investment and leadership opportunities for Indigenous arts and culture. 

“If we articulate land acknowledgements, than we should decolonize arts and culture,” said Megan Lau, the committee’s other co-chair.

“If we say Vancouver values culture, we have to find a way for artists … of every type to make a living wage.”

Drummers who call themselves Star Child at the Squamish Nation 32nd Youth Pow Wow in West Vancouver on Sunday, July 14, 2019. (Maggie MacPherson/CBC) (Maggie MacPherson/CBC)

‘Mission creep’

The plan was applauded by most councillors, who said it was a necessary step to ensure artists could continue to live in Vancouver. 

But Colleen Hardwick abstained from the vote, saying that while she had worked in the creative sector for over three decades, the plan was a sign of the city’s “mission creep.” 

“I’m supportive of the creative industries. I eat, live and breathe it. But I’m also very mindful … that we have to live within our means,” she said.

“We are continuing to ask for more and more on things that fall outside the scope of local government.”

However, all other councillors voted in favour. 

“This isn’t mission creep,” said Pete Fry. “This is how we build pride in our city. This is how we build the economy, [and]  how we build a city for everyone.” 

Vancouver’s new plan looks to “blanket the city in arts and culture,” with an emphasis on reconciliation, decolonizing, cultural equity and accessibility. (City of Vancouver )

26Mar

‘A thick accumulation of rodent excrement’: Inspectors found major issues after chowder rat video

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The seafood chowder prepared in a Vancouver restaurant kitchen was “unfit for human consumption,” according to an inspection report prepared after a rat was allegedly found in a customer’s bread bowl.

Cockroaches, mouse droppings and other rodent excrement were all visible when Vancouver Coastal Health inspectors visited the commercial commissary kitchen at Mamie Taylor’s restaurant on Dec. 28, 2018, according to a report obtained through a Freedom of Information (FOI) request.

At the time, Crab Park Chowdery was renting the basement space to prepare its chowder, but the kitchen is no longer being used to prepare food.

“General sanitation was poor,” Insp. Karen Rehbein writes of the kitchen.

“A cockroach was sighted running over [Crab Park Chowdery owner Ashton] Phillips’s head. Mouse droppings were noted inside the walk-in cooler, as well as in the food preparation and food storage areas. A thick accumulation of rodent excrement and accumulated debris was noted on plumbing lines situated above the cooking equipment.”

She notes that 10-litre plastic tubs of chowder were placed into a walk-in cooler once they were taken off the stove.

“At the time of inspection, the chowders in the walk-in cooler were NOT covered,” Rehbein wrote.

A video posted on Instagram Thursday appears to show a dead rat inside a breadbowl of soup at the Crab Park Chowdery in Vancouver’s Gastown neighbourhood. (Instagram/pisun_ne_ne)

The health authority ordered the inspection after a diner at Crab Park Chowdery posted a video on Instagram that showed what appeared to be a dead rat in her meal. The post caused a social media uproar and resulted in numerous complaints from the public.

Problems rectified, owner says

The two inspectors who accompanied Phillips to Mamie Taylor’s noted that there was no hand-washing sink in the base kitchen area, and one of the prep tables was placed directly below a sewer line. Fixtures in the washroom weren’t operating.

The inspectors ordered Phillips to throw out all of the chowder in the kitchen. Rehbein wrote “food is unfit for human consumption.”

The health authority shut down Mamie Taylor’s and its commercial kitchen after the inspection. The restaurant was allowed to reopen the next day, after staff made the necessary improvements.

Vancouver restaurant Mamie Taylor’s was only forced to close for one day after December’s incident. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

As a result of the rat incident, Mamie Taylor’s announced it was severing ties with Crab Park Chowdery and would no longer rent out the basement kitchen to other restaurants.

Mamie Taylor’s owner, Ron Oliver, told CBC that all of the problems in the Dec. 28 report have been rectified.

“Without tenants, without any use of the space that isn’t storage, we’re able to keep a much tighter control on what’s happening in the space that formerly housed the commissary,” he said.

He added that the restaurant has been inspected twice since the December incident and has passed both times.

Meanwhile, Crab Park Chowdery announced it was closing for good in January.

Read the Vancouver Coastal Health inspection report


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26Mar

‘A thick accumulation of rodent excrement’: Inspectors found major issues after chowder rat video

by admin

The seafood chowder prepared in a Vancouver restaurant kitchen was “unfit for human consumption,” according to an inspection report prepared after a rat was allegedly found in a customer’s bread bowl.

Cockroaches, mouse droppings and other rodent excrement were all visible when Vancouver Coastal Health inspectors visited the commercial commissary kitchen at Mamie Taylor’s restaurant on Dec. 28, 2018, according to a report obtained through a Freedom of Information (FOI) request.

At the time, Crab Park Chowdery was renting the basement space to prepare its chowder, but the kitchen is no longer being used to prepare food.

“General sanitation was poor,” Insp. Karen Rehbein writes of the kitchen.

“A cockroach was sighted running over [Crab Park Chowdery owner Ashton] Phillips’s head. Mouse droppings were noted inside the walk-in cooler, as well as in the food preparation and food storage areas. A thick accumulation of rodent excrement and accumulated debris was noted on plumbing lines situated above the cooking equipment.”

She notes that 10-litre plastic tubs of chowder were placed into a walk-in cooler once they were taken off the stove.

“At the time of inspection, the chowders in the walk-in cooler were NOT covered,” Rehbein wrote.

A video posted on Instagram in December 2018 appeared to show a dead rat inside a bread bowl of soup at the Crab Park Chowdery. (Instagram/pisun_ne_ne)

The health authority ordered the inspection after a diner at Crab Park Chowdery posted a video on Instagram that showed what appeared to be a dead rat in her meal. The post caused a social media uproar and resulted in numerous complaints from the public.

Problems rectified, owner says

The two inspectors who accompanied Phillips to Mamie Taylor’s noted that there was no hand-washing sink in the base kitchen area, and one of the prep tables was placed directly below a sewer line. Fixtures in the washroom weren’t operating.

The inspectors ordered Phillips to throw out all of the chowder in the kitchen. Rehbein wrote “food is unfit for human consumption.”

The health authority shut down Mamie Taylor’s and its commercial kitchen after the inspection. The restaurant was allowed to reopen the next day, after staff made the necessary improvements.

Vancouver restaurant Mamie Taylor’s was only forced to close for one day after December’s incident. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

As a result of the rat incident, Mamie Taylor’s announced it was severing ties with Crab Park Chowdery and would no longer rent out the basement kitchen to other restaurants.

Mamie Taylor’s owner, Ron Oliver, told CBC that all of the problems in the Dec. 28 report have been rectified.

“Without tenants, without any use of the space that isn’t storage, we’re able to keep a much tighter control on what’s happening in the space that formerly housed the commissary,” he said.

He added that the restaurant has been inspected twice since the December incident and has passed both times.

Meanwhile, Crab Park Chowdery announced it was closing for good in January.

Read the Vancouver Coastal Health inspection report


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18Sep

FAO says Ontario still has strong investment-grade score among major ratings agencies

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TORONTO – Ontario’s Financial Accountability Officer says one key component of the province’s financial picture is still strong despite concerns raised earlier in the year.

Peter Weltman issued a report on Ontario’s credit rating on Tuesday that says the province still has a strong investment-grade score among all four of the international agencies that keep tabs on it.


READ MORE:
Ontario deficit will jump to almost $12 billion in 2018: FAO

All four agencies rate Ontario in the middle of the pack among Canadian jurisdictions, but Weltman says all affirm the province has a strong credit rating.

Weltman says he anticipates a flurry of financial announcements from Premier Doug Ford’s Progressive Conservative government in the coming months, some of which could impact how rating agencies view Ontario’s credit.


READ MORE:
Ontario health-care spending not keeping pace with aging population: FAO

Two agencies, Moody’s and Fitch, revised their rating outlook for Ontario’s debt from stable to negative earlier this year, though the scores themselves did not change.

The spring election campaign that helped bring the Tories to power was filled with dire references to the state of Ontario’s finances, debt loads and deficit levels.

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