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Posts Tagged "overhaul"

20Sep

BC Ferries wants public input on major Horseshoe Bay terminal overhaul

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BC Ferries is in the early stages of redeveloping its decades-old Horseshoe Bay terminal and is now seeking public feedback.

The terminal, which services routes between Vancouver Island, the Sunshine Coast and Bowen Island, hasn’t gone through significant upgrades since the 1960s. Over years of growth, small changes and add-ons have tried to accommodate an increase in travellers, but BC Ferries says the terminal is at capacity. 

“The Horseshoe Bay terminal plays a significant role in connecting communities and customers,” said Mark Wilson, vice president of strategy and community engagement, in a news release. 

“This makes it a good time to get more detailed input on how we improve the terminal to meet the community’s future growth and emerging needs.”

Last May, BC Ferries surveyed 1,500 people to get feedback on what they’d like to see in the redevelopment. Themes that came out of that process included efficiency, accessibility and integrating the village. Some design concepts were developed from that feedback. 

“We’ve developed these draft concepts with what we heard, and now we want to further define them with more input from the community,” Wilson said. 

As part of its process and based on that initial feedback, BC Ferries has created a “visual profile” that will be used in future designs. For example, several images are included to “reflect the kind of narrative you would like the design of the terminal to tell,” such as a West Coast shore, present ferry terminal and a seal. 

Some of the changes proposed include a second exit road, a new waiting area for foot passengers, a transportation hub and another storey being added to the terminal building.

From now until Oct. 13, anyone can give feedback online. There is also a community engagement event scheduled on Oct. 7 from 4 to 8 p.m. at the Gleneagles Golf Course in West Vancouver.

The engagement process is part of a long-term, 25-year plan for the terminal and construction likely wouldn’t begin until the mid-2020s.  

18Jul

New report calls for overhaul of chronic pain treatment

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A new report from the Canadian Pain Task Force is calling the issue of chronic pain a “significant public health issue” and says the health sector has a chance to overhaul how it is treated to better help Canadians.

The report notes that one in five Canadians are thought to live with chronic pain, with two-thirds of those reporting their pain as moderate to severe.

“People living with pain have limited access to the services they require and often face stigma and undue suffering as a result of their condition,” the report reads.

Chronic pain has been recognized by the World Health Organization as a disease, and is defined as pain persisting or recurring for longer than three months, associated with significant emotional distress, significant functional disability and the symptoms are not better accounted for by another diagnoses.

It notes chronic pain more often afflicts those in populations living in poverty, Indigenous peoples and women, among others.

The opioid overdose crisis has also complicated the treatment options for those suffering from chronic pain.

The task force claims people who could benefit from opioids to manage pain are now facing barriers to obtain a prescription.

“There is a need to promote shared decision-making between health care professionals and people living with pain. Prescribing decisions must be based on the unique needs of the individual, but this is not supported by the current environment.”

The report calls for better co-ordination between the provinces and territories as a starting point.

“Provincial/territorial policies and efforts could be better coordinated to reduce duplication of effort, maximize efficiency and implementation of best practices, and ensure people living with pain have the same level of care across Canada,” the report reads.

Pain BC – an organization that looks to help those suffering from chronic pain in British Columbia – welcomed the report and its conclusions.

“This report makes Health Canada aware of what Canadians with pain have known for too long: that pain care is largely not accessible, many health care providers lack the knowledge and skills to manage pain and breakthroughs in research are hampered by lack of funding,” said Executive Director Maria Hudspith in a statement. “We hope this report lays the foundation for a national pain strategy that will improve the lives of Canadians who live with pain.”


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