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Posts Tagged "Pauls"

7Oct

Hospital foundation has raised 75 per cent of its pledge for new St. Paul’s

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https://vancouversun.com/


The Pattison Foundation has made a $75 million donation to fund the Jim Pattison Medical Centre at the new St. Paul’s Hospital. The new facility is described as “a purpose-built, fully-integrated health campus, comprising the entire 18.4-acre site on Station Street in the False Creek Flats.”


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The St. Paul’s Foundation has set its sights on raising $225 million toward the cost of a new hospital to be built three kilometres away, on an unused field in the False Creek flats.

With pledges and donations totalling $168 million to date, the foundation is three quarters of the way to completing what’s been called the largest hospital fundraising campaign in Western Canada. The single largest donation was for $75 million from the Pattison Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Vancouver billionaire Jim Pattison‘s empire.

The health care campus will be called the Jim Pattison Medical Centre.

The price tag for the new 12-storey hospital at 1002 Station Street is an ever changing, ever-escalating target, most recently estimated at almost $2 billion. The site, currently a gravel lot atop a former mud flat at the end of False Creek inlet, will be divided into parcels allowing for phased-in construction of buildings. The hospital, a 69-space child daycare centre, outpatient medical clinics, and offices for administrators and researchers are expected to be completed first, by about 2026.

In the second phase of construction, other parcels will be developed for rental housing offered to health care workers, a hotel with kitchenettes for patients seeking care at the hospital as 40 per cent of St. Paul’s patients come from communities outside the Lower Mainland, more offices and a second daycare centre. The initial business plan approved and funded by the government does not cover other structures, only the hospital, according to Providence Health spokesman Shaf Hussain. 

Geotechnical remediation work on the False Creek Flats land that is susceptible to liquefaction has not yet begun. The rezoning hearing, to change the site from industrial to comprehensive development, is October 22 and although construction is not expected to begin for another year, government and hospital leaders maintain the new facility will open in 2026.

While the proportion being raised through philanthropy may appear small, relative to the overall cost, it is ambitious in relation to other health sector fundraising campaigns, according to material gathered by staff of the St. Paul’s Foundation.

For example, the B.C. Children’s Hospital Foundation capital campaign target for its new hospital was $150 million. And the Lion’s Gate Hospital Foundation target for a new medical/surgical centre was $100 million. The Royal Columbian Hospital Foundation capital campaign target for a multiphase redevelopment is also $100 million while the Richmond Hospital Foundation will try to raise up to $50 million for its new building.

All of those projects pale in size when compared to the new St. Paul’s. 

Paul Hollands, the chairman of A&W Food Services of Canada, and chair of the St. Paul’s Foundation fundraising campaign committee said that private donor fundraising will account for about 10 per cent of the total cost of the hospital.

“We came up with this amount of $225 million after looking at other capital campaigns, talking to key leaders and gauging support in the community. It’s a big number but in the coming months, you will hear about some more big and smaller donations. People are seeing how we are trying to do something extraordinary because this is a once in a lifetime opportunity,” he said, referring to the blank canvas the vacant, 18.4-acre site offers.

“Eight or nine years ago we were more modest in our ambitions. But the fact that we’ve had this very long gestation period means we’ve been able to crystallize our desire to create something really special.”

The existing 6.7 acre St. Paul’s site has already been listed and is expected to yield at least $800 million. Taxpayers will fund the remaining amount of the new hospital construction.

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Twitter: @MedicineMatters

18Jun

New St. Paul’s Hospital to get $12 million for hearing loss centre

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The new St. Paul’s Hospital will feature a state of the art hearing loss centre, funded through $12 million in equal $6 million commitments from a Rotary Club foundation and the hospital’s own fundraising arm.


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The new St. Paul’s Hospital will feature a state of the art hearing loss centre, funded through $12 million in equal $6 million commitments from a Rotary Club foundation and the hospital’s own fundraising arm.

The Rotary Club of Vancouver has been supporting hearing loss or deafness for three decades. In 1985, it formed the Rotary Club of Vancouver Hearing Foundation to address an unmet need in the philanthropy community. Through bike-a-thons and other events, it has raised over $3.5 million.

But the $6 million pledge is the biggest fundraising challenge for the charity. Jack Zaleski, president of the Rotary’s hearing foundation, said the St. Paul’s endeavour will be separate from the smaller donor bike events.

“We recognize with this opportunity that we can do something truly extraordinary, creating the premier clinic for those afflicted with hearing problems and deafness, a centre where everything will be under one roof.”

Zaleski said the foundation will leave no stone unturned in its mission to raise money. It will approach pharmaceutical companies, technology companies and everyone else involved in supplying services and equipment for the hearing community.


The provincial government hopes that a new St. Paul’s Hospital will open for patients by 2026.

The most recent big donation to the hospital development project came from the Louie family, which owns London Drugs. Two years ago, Vancouver billionaire Jimmy Pattison pledged $75 million for the new hospital, which is expected to be built by the fall of 2026 at a cost of nearly $2 billion. The existing hospital on Burrard Street will likely be demolished with land sales helping to fund the redevelopment of the False Creek flats site.

The B.C. Rotary Hearing and Balance Centre will include examination rooms, surgical suites, research space and laboratories. Funds will be earmarked for audiology testing and research, tinnitus and vestibular conditions that often affect balance. Since hearing often affects seniors, the centre will have specialized care for those who, because of age, mobility and geography, are less likely to access specialized hearing care.

“Benefiting thousands of patients provincewide, this funding will help us transform the patient experience …” said Dr. Brian Westerberg, head of the division of otolaryngology at St. Paul’s.

He noted that hearing problems are sometimes linked to other conditions so the new centre will allow for improved interactions and collaborations between doctors and health researchers in numerous areas including neurology, physiotherapy, kinesiology, psychiatry, ophthalmology and gerontology

The existing BC Rotary Hearing and Balance Centre at St. Paul’s Hospital had 4,629 patient visits from April 1, 2018 to March 31, 2019.

Broek Bosma, chief development officer for the St. Paul’s Foundation, characterized the donation pledge by Rotary as a “golden opportunity we did not want to miss.”

St. Paul’s has been the province’s main referral centre for patients with complex ear and hearing problems and it was the first hospital in Canada to offer cochlear implants in 1982. Since then, nearly 800 adult patients have had the revolutionary procedure there. B.C. Children’s Hospital offers the procedure as well to pediatric patients.

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16May

St. Paul’s Hospital receives $1-million gift to buy life-saving equipment

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St. Paul’s Hospital has received a $1-million gift to buy special equipment that saved the life of a clinically dead man in February. From left to right: Dr. Jamil Bashir, patient Chris Dawkins, paramedics Thomas Watson and Benjamin Johnson, dispatcher Anne-Marie Forrest are pictured at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, BC, April 8, 2019.


Arlen Redekop / PNG

St. Paul’s Hospital has received a $1-million gift to buy special equipment that saved the life of a clinically dead man in February.

The dramatic story of Chris Dawkin’s rescue was a front-page story in a Postmedia paper last month. Among those who read the article was an anonymous donor.

On Feb. 5, Dawkins, a 55-year-old Vancouver physician, had just completed a workout on his rowing machine when he suffered cardiac arrest. His heart had stopped beating at 6:04 p.m. after a piece of plaque broke off a coronary artery and stopped the blood supply – Dawkins was considered clinically dead.

But his wife was present and able to perform chest compressions. The paramedics who arrived – Tom Watson and Ben Johnson – happened to be trained in a special emergency protocol for treating cardiac-arrest patients and were able to use a Lucas machine – one of six on loan to B.C. Ambulance Services by the manufacturer – to continue chest compressions while transporting Dawkins.

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When he arrived at St. Paul’s, a team of 15 specializing in cardiac arrest not treatable by standard therapies had been notified and was waiting. Dr. Jamil Bashir, a cardiovascular surgeon, had already performed two surgeries and was preparing to head home when he was called into emergency.

Dawkins was hooked up to a heart-lung bypass machine while Bashir operated. The machine is one of five at St. Paul’s.

But even after being clinically dead for 52 minutes, Dawkins survived the heart attack and surgery in great health.

The rescue story was written by Postmedia reporter Gord McIntyre and ran on the front page of the paper on a Tuesday morning in early April. After reading the article, an anonymous donor immediately picked up the phone and called St. Paul’s Foundation, said hospital spokeswoman Ann Gibbon.


A heart-lung bypass machine is pictured in the foreground and a Lucas chest compression machine is pictured in the background.

St. Paul’s Hospital / Handout

The gift would be $1 million and must only be used to purchase the machines and equipment that saved Dawkins’ life, the donor instructed.

“The great part of this story is that this protocol, started about four years ago, has come full circle with this donation,” said Dick Vollet, president and CEO of the St. Paul’s Foundation.

“It’s a great example of how innovation and donor support can come together to save lives.”

The $1 million gift will purchase three new heart-lung bypass machines at a cost of $250,000 each, seven Lucas chest compression machines, three TEE probes used to assess airways and one blood gas analyzer.

Paramedics treat about 400 cardiac arrest cases each year. Survival chances are one in 10 if an otherwise healthy individual suffers the arrest outside of a hospital.

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10Apr

St. Paul’s trials new device for skin-to-skin care after C-sections

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Lisa Wong demonstrates the “Joeyband” with newborn son Bruce Nagai in the maternity ward at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver.


Gerry Kahrmann / PNG

St. Paul’s Hospital has taken a cue from the kangaroo to keep moms and babies healthier and happier after a caesarean delivery.

The hospital has been testing out the Joeyband to promote skin-to-skin contact between babies and mothers who have just had a C-section, which requires incisions in the abdomen and uterus and an anesthetic. The stretchable nylon-spandex loop, made by Canadian firm S2S Innovations Inc., holds a newborn snuggly against its mother’s chest and abdomen after birth.

Studies have shown that skin-to-skin contact promotes breastfeeding and bonding, and helps reduce risk for postpartum depression.

Scott Harrison, director for the maternity centre at St. Paul’s, said the Joeyband takes its name from the babies of kangaroos, who spend months in their mothers’ pouches after birth. Human skin-to-skin contact following birth is often called “kangaroo care.”

The band is particularly useful in the operating room immediately following a C-section, Harrison said.

“It’s a very supportive band that holds the baby quite firmly to moms. Dads can use it, too, and other family members who might be involved,” he said.

“For mothers and babies, after a C-section, it’s been difficult in the past to get babies safely in skin-to-skin because mom’s got IV lines in, or is a little bit sleepy still, or has some discomfort.”


In this Jan. 9, 2013 photo provided by the Chicago Zoological Society, ten- and 11-month-old kangaroo joeys poke their heads out of their mothers’ pouches at the Brookfield Zoo’s Australia House exhibit in Brookfield, Ill. The joeys were born on Feb. 20 and March 13 of last year and have only recently emerged from the pouches to explore their new surroundings.

Jim Schulz /

AP

Skin-to-skin contact also stimulates the creation of breast milk, and regulates the baby’s temperature and breathing, Harrison added.

The Joeyband is used in hospitals across North America but St. Paul’s is the first in Canada to try the band right in its operating rooms, the company confirmed. About 20 mothers have used it at St. Paul’s so far, Harrison said.

“All the feedback from them has been that it’s really comfortable and they’ve really enjoyed that experience,” he said.

“This product has enabled us to do something new for women in the immediate hours after a caesarean section.”

Harrison said using the band to support newborns frees up nurses to focus more on breastfeeding, monitoring the mother’s vital signs and other important duties.

He said the band is used until the mom has recovered from the surgert and is able to hold the baby independently, often after a couple weeks. Typically, a mom will go home within two or three days after a C-section. They will be given a band to take with them, funded by the St. Paul’s Foundation.


Puneet Bains used the Joeyband at St. Paul’s Hospital after her son Zayn was delivered by C-section in December, 2017.

Submitted

Puneet Bains, an oncologist at Lions Gate Hospital, used the Joeyband at St. Paul’s after her second son, Zayn, was delivered by C-section there in December 2017.

“I’d been through the procedure before so I actually found it quite helpful,” she said. “It was painless and it was comfortable. You always worry about anything new — is it going to be comfortable, is it going to interfere with anything?”

Bains said she was quite immobile after the C-section but the band kept Zayn safe and secure against her chest.

“I wasn’t worried about him falling or slipping,” she said.

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15Feb

New St. Paul’s Hospital gets green light from B.C. government

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The provincial government announced this morning that a new St. Paul’s Hospital will open for patients by 2026.


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The provincial government announced this morning that a new St. Paul’s Hospital will open for patients by 2026.

Premier John Horgan said the new hospital will have 548 beds, 115 more than the hospital on Burrard Street, which was founded 125 years ago.

The new hospital will cost $1.9 billion. It will be located at 1002 Station Street on the False Creek Flats.

Horgan says the plan for the new hospital had stalled for 12 years, but the wait is over with the approval of a business plan for construction.

The project will be funded with the provincial government and Providence Health Care sharing costs, and B.C. businessman Jim Pattison has already donated $75 million to the new hospital.

The property where the current St. Paul’s hospital stands in downtown Vancouver will also be sold to fund part of the project.

The hospital will offer specialized and general care, emergency and critical care, there will be mental health and addictions beds and community outreach programs.

The government says St. Paul’s will also remain a teaching hospital, training hundreds of University of B.C. medical students and other health-sector professionals.

(With files from CP)

More to come.


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6Nov

BCNU says nursing vacancies in St. Paul’s ER gradually being filled

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Three of the five nursing vacancies at St. Paul’s Hospital have been filled since September.


Jason Payne / PNG

A nursing crisis in the emergency department at St. Paul’s Hospital caused by resignations and personnel turnover is gradually being resolved after the B.C. Nurses’ Union forced a formal review.

In September, Postmedia reported that nearly three dozen registered nurses had left the emergency department (ED) in the past year because of a nursing shortage leading to too much overtime and harsh working conditions. In the past two months, five vacancies have dwindled to three, according to Elaine Yong, spokeswoman for St. Paul’s.

There are about 20 nurses working in the unit during each 12-hour shift. An average of 250 patients are in the ED of the downtown Vancouver hospital each day.

“We have made good progress in addressing the ED nursing situation (and) collaborative meetings with the union are ongoing,” Yong said.


Christine Sorensen, president of the B.C. Nurses’ Union.

Peter Holst /

PNG

Christine Sorensen, president of the BCNU, said she is “cautiously optimistic” about the direction St. Paul’s leaders are going now that the matter has been reported in the media and the union has initiated the formal review.

“It’s unfortunate that it takes a story in the media before change occurs. But I think the public pressure has helped. As well, there’s a new manager in the unit and nurses have a lot of respect for this individual. I even heard that once St. Paul’s leaders committed to the review process, some nurses who were thinking of resigning actually rescinded.”

According to Yong, several BCIT grads will be coming on staff in the next few weeks and another group of nursing students will start their specialty training in January. As well, a few nurses from other communities outside of Vancouver have relocated to St. Paul’s. But nursing vacancies appear to be a fact of life because specialized nurses are hard to recruit and retain, Yong said.

Sorensen said the union is still pressing to get a copy of a master staff rotation list so it can analyze the patient-to-staff ratio, “but oddly, we are being told that cannot be provided.”

There are 150 nurses available to the ED, including about 70 full-time nurses, 26 part-time and about 50 casuals.

“It’s odd that we are having difficulty getting this information and even more odd that management doesn’t have a grasp on this sort of thing,” Sorensen said, referring to the master staff list.

Sorensen said St. Paul’s is far from unique in being short on nurses.

“Last week, I heard about a situation in the north where a newly graduated nurse who had been working in an emergency unit for only a month was placed in charge because they are so short-staffed. It takes a few years to be a charge nurse. But that’s how desperate the situation is,” she said, adding that there is a hospital on Vancouver Island that has nine nurse vacancies in its ED.

Sorensen said many hospitals put non-nurses in ED management roles and, “not to disparage physiotherapists or dietitians, but they cannot understand the complexities and don’t have the education, expertise and support. So they may be way out of their depth as the managers (of nurses) in these emergency units.”

According to exit interviews conducted with nurses who have left the ED, their reasons include challenging patient demographics, the housing affordability crisis, and other work opportunities.

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6Nov

BCNU says nursing vacancies in St. Paul’s ER gradually being filled

by admin





Three of the five nursing vacancies at St. Paul’s Hospital have been filled since September.


Jason Payne / PNG

A nursing crisis in the emergency department at St. Paul’s Hospital caused by resignations and personnel turnover is gradually being resolved after the B.C. Nurses’ Union forced a formal review.

In September, Postmedia reported that nearly three dozen registered nurses had left the emergency department (ED) in the past year because of a nursing shortage leading to too much overtime and harsh working conditions. In the past two months, five vacancies have dwindled to three, according to Elaine Yong, spokeswoman for St. Paul’s.

There are about 20 nurses working in the unit during each 12-hour shift. An average of 250 patients are in the ED of the downtown Vancouver hospital each day.

“We have made good progress in addressing the ED nursing situation (and) collaborative meetings with the union are ongoing,” Yong said.


Christine Sorensen, president of the B.C. Nurses’ Union.

Peter Holst /

PNG

Christine Sorensen, president of the BCNU, said she is “cautiously optimistic” about the direction St. Paul’s leaders are going now that the matter has been reported in the media and the union has initiated the formal review.

“It’s unfortunate that it takes a story in the media before change occurs. But I think the public pressure has helped. As well, there’s a new manager in the unit and nurses have a lot of respect for this individual. I even heard that once St. Paul’s leaders committed to the review process, some nurses who were thinking of resigning actually rescinded.”

According to Yong, several BCIT grads will be coming on staff in the next few weeks and another group of nursing students will start their specialty training in January. As well, a few nurses from other communities outside of Vancouver have relocated to St. Paul’s. But nursing vacancies appear to be a fact of life because specialized nurses are hard to recruit and retain, Yong said.

Sorensen said the union is still pressing to get a copy of a master staff rotation list so it can analyze the patient-to-staff ratio, “but oddly, we are being told that cannot be provided.”

There are 150 nurses available to the ED, including about 70 full-time nurses, 26 part-time and about 50 casuals.

“It’s odd that we are having difficulty getting this information and even more odd that management doesn’t have a grasp on this sort of thing,” Sorensen said, referring to the master staff list.

Sorensen said St. Paul’s is far from unique in being short on nurses.

“Last week, I heard about a situation in the north where a newly graduated nurse who had been working in an emergency unit for only a month was placed in charge because they are so short-staffed. It takes a few years to be a charge nurse. But that’s how desperate the situation is,” she said, adding that there is a hospital on Vancouver Island that has nine nurse vacancies in its ED.

Sorensen said many hospitals put non-nurses in ED management roles and, “not to disparage physiotherapists or dietitians, but they cannot understand the complexities and don’t have the education, expertise and support. So they may be way out of their depth as the managers (of nurses) in these emergency units.”

According to exit interviews conducted with nurses who have left the ED, their reasons include challenging patient demographics, the housing affordability crisis, and other work opportunities.

[email protected]

Twitter: @MedicineMatters




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31Oct

London Drugs family gives $6.5 million toward new St. Paul’s Hospital

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The cardiac centre at the new St. Paul’s Hospital will be named the Tong Louie Cardiac Wing in recognition of a $6.5-million donation from the Vancouver family that owns London Drugs, it was announced Tuesday.

Two charities — the London Drugs Foundation and the Tong and Geraldine Louie Family Foundation — are contributing the sum for the new hospital near Main Street and Terminal Avenue. The 124-year old hospital on Burrard Street is to be demolished after construction on the new hospital ends, in 2024 or later.


Brandt Louie speaks as St. Paul’s Foundation announces donations from the London Drug Foundation and the Louie family at Wall Centre Hotel in Vancouver, BC, Oct. 30, 2018.

Arlen Redekop /

PNG

“As a 115-year-old B.C. owned and operated family company, we are proud of our lengthy history of giving back to the people of this province,” said Brandt Louie, chair of London Drugs Ltd.

“This is a proud moment for our family and we are honoured to be part of the bold, bright future of the new St. Paul’s.”

Louie said in a statement that family matriarch Geraldine Louie received exceptional care at St. Paul’s towards the end of her life and while being treated for congenital heart disease.


An image of the proposed Tong Louie Cardiac Wing at the St. Paul’s Hospital site in False Creek.

Arlen Redekop /

PNG

The donation will be used for an in-patient wing of the hospital that will be built on the False Creek Flats. The wing will be located close to imaging and diagnostic areas, operating rooms, outpatient clinics, cardiac research labs and medical offices. The design is meant to allow patient treatment and research side-by-side.

Dr. Sean Virani, the physician program director for the Heart Centre, said the donation will help recruit cardiologists and  surgeons and expand care for patients. St. Paul’s is the only hospital in B.C. that performs heart transplants. Under pioneering interventional cardiologist Dr. John Webb, it has become world-famous for minimally invasive heart valve surgery.

Construction of the new hospital is not expected to begin for a few years as the City of Vancouver rezoning process is expected to take more than a year and soil remediation will require extensive work.

The B.C. government has not yet announced approval of the more than $1 billion business plan, but numerous announcements from the hospital foundation would suggest the project — first announced by the former Liberal government — will go ahead. Just over a year ago, health minister Adrian Dix said the redevelopment of St. Paul’s on the False Creek flats was one of his priorities.

It is expected the sale of the lands under the existing hospital will fund the construction of the new hospital, to which Jimmy Pattison has already pledged $75 million. While the hospital itself will still be called St. Paul’s, the campus will be called the Jim Pattison Medical Centre.

On Monday night, the foundation held an invitation-only gala event for past and future donors.


St. Paul’s Foundation announces donations from the Louie family, some of whom are pictured here (left to right) Gregory, Kurt, Brandt and Stuart, at Wall Centre Hotel in Vancouver, BC, Oct. 30, 2018.

Arlen Redekop /

PNG

Chronology of the site where new St. Paul’s Hospital will be built:

1912-20: False Creek drained to make way for construction of railway lines. A Great Northern Railway station is built on the site, with a Canadian National Railway station, which still stands, built to the south.

1930: Great Northern Railway freight sheds occupy the south end of the site. Businesses along Prior Street include Canadian Junk Co. and a junk storage warehouse.

1956: The site is occupied by Finning Factory and the Great Northern Railway freight shed. Prior Street businesses include the United Fruit Ltd., Canadian Junk and Great West Smelting.

1966: Great Northern Railway is moved and the train station is torn down.

2000: Schroeder Properties and ING Realty Partners purchase the site for $22 million from Trillium Corp., hoping to develop the site for the high-tech and dot-com industries.

2004: A Providence Health Care-affiliated entity buys 18.5 acres from Schroeder Properties and ING Realty Partners for just over $24 million. The entire amount is financed with a bank loan.

2010: Gravel is added to reinforce and level the site for use during the 2010 Olympic Games as a parking lot for the buses that transport people between Vancouver and Whistler.

2010: The B.C. government acknowledges it has paid millions in municipal taxes to hold the site for the future hospital.

2015: Providence Health Care, which manages St. Paul’s Hospital and numerous other Catholic health facilities, announces a new $1.2 billion hospital on the new site and the eventual demolition of the old hospital in the West End.

2017: Vancouver billionaire Jimmy Pattison announces a $75 million donation to the new St. Paul’s. NDP health minister Adrian Dix says the new hospital is a high priority.

2018: Fundraising, rezoning and public consultation process begins in earnest for the new St. Paul’s.

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29Oct

MEDICINE MATTERS: Gala tonight for the “New St. Paul’s Hospital” – even before it’s officially approved

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Artist’s concept of the new St. Paul’s Hospital.


PNG

The B.C. government hasn’t yet announced cabinet and Treasury Board approval for the St. Paul’s Hospital redevelopment plan.

But that hasn’t stopped donations from pouring in.

Tomorrow morning, the St. Paul’s Hospital Foundation is set to announce – at the Sheraton Wall Centre – a sizeable donation for the new hospital that is expected to open in 2024 on the False Creek flats.

Nor has the lack of government approval precluded tonight’s invitation-only gala for “the new St. Paul’s.”

Red invitations like the one you see in this post have been sent to past and future donors.

The email invitation to the event at the Rocky Mountaineer was a bit of a surprise given the lack of government approval but I’m told this is not unusual for hospital fundraisers.

They need to get philanthropists on board long before governments issue press releases. And despite a $75 million pledge from Jimmy Pattison for the new hospital campus that will bear his name, the St. Paul’s Hospital Foundation has plenty of fundraising to do since the project will likely cost well over $1 billion.


Conceptual drawing for new St. Paul’s Hospital campus.

A ministry of health spokeswoman said the government has nothing to announce on St. Paul’s yet so it regards the gala as a routine fundraising event.

(In 2012, the former Liberal government committed to funding of $500 million for the hospital redevelopment; I’m assuming that amount will have to increase substantially given the passage of time and increase in construction costs).

We can safely assume that financial institutions will have no hesitation granting construction loans since, apart from the fact taxpayers underwriting this massive project, the current site of the hospital on Burrard Street is expected to yield hundreds of millions of dollars when the hospital is torn down and the land sold off to developers.

The fact the government hasn’t announced its approval of the business plan hasn’t stopped the City of Vancouver rezoning process. Expect that process to take at least a year.

The new St. Paul’s Hospital campus rezoning concept envisions multiple buildings. IBI Group has submitted the application for the 18.5 acre site. It includes the new hospital, retail/commercial space, research facilities, professional offices childcare facilities and a hotel.

Community engagement is occurring now. It’s not clear how long the public engagement process will take before hearings on the applications to rezone the False Creek flats site from industrial to mixed use.

But it’s imperative civic politicians take into account the need for affordable housing close to the hospital since nurses and other healthcare providers are struggling to live in Vancouver, even with their solid salaries and incomes.

Indeed, I’m repeatedly hearing that nursing vacancies are becoming increasingly difficult to fill because of the housing affordability crisis.

A new hospital must be accompanied by affordable housing for the people who will work in it. The Jim Pattison Medical Centre, as it will be called, should have a residential component either on the campus or directly on the outskirts.

Read more about the challenges of the new site and a historical timeline here.

pfayerman@vancouversun.com

Follow me on Twitter: @MedicineMatters

 

 


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