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Posts Tagged "student"

12Sep

TD Bank refuses to refund art student $600 in fraudulent cheques | CBC News

by admin

A Vancouver man is frustrated TD Canada Trust will not reimburse him for $600 in fraudulent cheques that were cashed on his bank account this summer.

Preston Buffalo, a student at Emily Carr University of Art and Design, says he misplaced his chequebook but isn’t sure exactly when or how.

The bank says Preston Buffalo didn’t exercise due diligence in protecting his cheque book and said it won’t refund the money.

Buffalo discovered the theft in late July when he returned from a visit with family in Edmonton. 

He said six cheques, each for $100, and none of them written by Buffalo, were cashed between July 15 and July 27.

The transactions wiped out his savings account.

“In Vancouver, $600 is the difference between being homeless, or not, in a month. It’s that tight,” said Buffalo, 39.

Buffalo lives on disability payments and is a mature student Emily Carr. His First Nation in Alberta pays his tuition. 

Two of six fraudulent cheques different signatures. (Submitted by Preston Buffalo)

 

Buffalo immediately reported the discrepancy in his account to the downtown Vancouver branch of TD Canada Trust. 

He says he and bank staff compared his signature cards on-file to signatures on the half dozen cheques. 

“It was nothing like how I sign my name,” said Buffalo. 

He says bank staff told him “clearly, this is not your signature.”

The bank indicated the cheques had been deposited through an ATM. Buffalo understood that after the bank reviewed surveillance video, the footage would confirm that he was not the culprit depositing the cheques and he would get his money back.

‘No due diligence’ says TD

TD’s fraud division, however, had a different opinion. 

After interviewing Buffalo and reviewing his case, it determined he didn’t exercise “due diligence” in protecting his cheque book.

He was told his money would not be returned. 

In June, Buffalo had moved from one Vancouver apartment to another. 

TD Canada Trust has Preston Buffalo’s appeal under review but has given no timeline as to when there may be a resolution. (Maggie MacPherson/CBC)

He was about to pay his July rent at the new place when he realized he couldn’t find his cheque book. 

Buffalo simply assumed it was in one of his unpacked boxes and he would look for it when he got back from his Alberta visit.

In the meantime, he paid his rent with a bank draft and went on vacation. 

Buffalo doesn’t know what happened to his cheque book. He isn’t sure if he left it at his old apartment or if he mistakenly threw it out, but somehow it fell into the wrong hands.   

Buffalo is appealing TD’s ruling. 

TD: ‘matter still active’  

In an email, Ryan Sang Lee, TD Canada Trust’s manager of corporate and public affairs, said the matter is still active and the bank won’t provide an official statement until “the process plays out.” In a subsequent email, Sang said the bank is working with the customer to resolve the issue.

Lawyer Priyan Samarakoone, says there’s no excuse for financial institutions to not verify all cheques no matter their amount. (Maggie MacPherson/CBC)

 

‘No excuse’ 

Meanwhile, a civil litigation lawyer says the bank could have prevented the fraud.  

Priyan Samarakoone said most financial institutions only verify signatures on cheques deposited at automated teller machines over a certain value, and ones with lower amounts just pass through. 

“The pressure needs to be on the big institutions to verify every single cheque that comes through,” said Samarakoone. 

“There’s no excuse for banks to not verify all cheques.”

Verifying every cheque, he says, would protect consumers and banks. 

One of the biggest issues for banks, he says, are people who wrongly claim they’ve been defrauded in an attempt to scam the bank.  

Police investigation 

Buffalo has reported the incident to Vancouver police. He wants whoever took his money to be stopped — and feels the bank is not interested in doing the same. 

“It seems easy for them to be — ‘Nope, it was your fault. Stamp. Done. You’re not getting your money,'” said Buffalo. 

Buffalo said before his money disappeared it was the first time in years that he felt he had his head above water. 

Now, he’s struggling again. 

With files from Paisley Woodward

28Feb

Teachers honoured for saving student in cardiac arrest

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Two Okanagan teachers were honoured by B.C. Emergency Health Services in Oliver on Tuesday for helping save the life of a student who went into cardiac arrest during gym class about a month ago. 

South Okanagan Secondary School teachers Steve Podomorow and Mike Russo resuscitated 13-year-old, Dilshaan Dhaliwal, using CPR and an automated external defibrillator or AED. 

“[The AED] gave him the best chance he could have possibly had. So, the AED was paramount in the success of this,” said Russo.

Quick action

During a joint gym class Jan. 30 with Russo’s Grade 8 class and Podomorow ‘s senior class, Dhaliwal collapsed after a 12 minute run, Podomorow told Daybreak South host Chris Walker. 

The Grade 8 student had just handed in his running results to Russo and was walking past Podomorow, when he went into cardiac arrest.

“I’m the first aid person at the school and checked him out quickly, got 911 on the phone and started the CPR process,” said Russo.

Oliver student Dilshaan Dhaliwal was flown to B.C. Children’s Hospital in Vancouver for treatment after going into sudden cardiac arrest in gym class at school. (BC Emergency Health Services)

Podomorow said the 911 dispatcher stayed on the line with them the entire time, helping them throughout the process.

“We had the AED on and starting CPR probably within two to three minutes,” said Russo.

He estimates that he performed CPR for about eight or nine minutes. Dhaliwal was later flown to the B.C. Children’s Hospital for treatment. 

AED

“We were very fortunate to have the AED really close by,” said Podomorow. He said the easy accessibility to the defibrillator helped them and the paramedics use it quickly. 

Russo said he believes the AED, in addition to CPR, saved Dhaliwal’s life. 

“He was in a shockable rhythm and so when you have the AED there, we can hopefully reset the heart, and it was able to do that,” said Russo.

Many schools across the Okanagan have AEDs, but not all do.

The AED at South Okanagan Secondary School had been donated by the Advanced Coronary Treatment Foundation.

The North Okanagan-Shuswap School District announced last week that it would be adding defibrillators to all of its schools over the next three years.

Award

“[The incident] was definitely somewhat alarming, especially for me, but I think we work well together,” said Podomorow.

Russo, who is also a volunteer fireman, and Podomorrow were awarded the Vital Link Award by B.C. Emergency Health Services for their quick actions.   

Meanwhile, Podmorrow said Dhaliwal has been recovering at home but will have to undergo another procedure. 

“We’re very excited for his return and hope to see him around here soon,” said Podmorrow.

Two Okanagan teachers were honoured by BC Emergency Health Services in Oliver on Tuesday, for saving the life of a student who went into cardiac arrest during gym class about a month ago. 6:05

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4Feb

Visually impaired student and guide dog asked to provide ID multiple times a day

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Georgia Pike is fed up being stopped in public and asked for identification.

The fourth-year student at the University of Victoria is visually impaired and relies on her service dog, Grainger, to get around.

But not everyone believes her.

“People will come up to me and say, ‘is your dog a service dog?'” she said. “I say yes and they say, ‘can we see some I.D. for it?'”

It’s become an almost daily occurrence.

Pike was recently stopped multiple times in the same mall by different security guards and, once, was asked three times for identification while trying to board a ferry.

“It’s become quite debilitating, recently, because it happens so often,” she told Gregor Craigie, the host of CBC’s On The Island.

“I’ll sometimes just opt out of trips with friends because I don’t know what’s going to happen.”

She carries a wallet stuffed full of IDs — one from the training school and one from the government for her dog and four indicating that she is visually impaired — but said constantly being asked to prove herself points to a larger issue.

“People with disabilities in B.C. … have to prove to random strangers day in and day out that they have the right to be in a public location,” she said.

“It’s constantly reminding people that they have a disability and that we’re different.”

It’s easy to prove that Grainger is a guide dog — he has two pieces of ID indicating it — but the bigger question, Pike says, is why it’s necessary to always have to keep producing them. (Gregor Craigie/CBC)

Provincewide problem

Pike is not the only one being stopped and asked to prove the legitimacy of their service animal, according to the CEO of B.C. and Alberta Guide Dogs, William Thornton.

He said he’s heard of several similar cases, recently, with at least one person being denied entry to a business.

“This subject really is more about fraudulent dogs than it is about the legitimate dogs,” Thornton said.

“There’s great abuse out there with people buying equipment online — I.D. cards and jackets and then saying that they are a legitimate dog.”

His organization runs education programs to help businesses distinguish between legitimate service dogs and fraudulent ones.

Pike agreed more education is key.

When she’s out with Grainger, she said, there are keys signs that he’s working: he’s not sniffing around or misbehaving, he doesn’t bark, and they are constantly communicating with hand signals.

“What I would love to see is that businesses are trained and educated on how to spot a service dog,” she said.

“I feel so safe being guided by him and it’s people around me who are interrupting our work and interrupting our day.”

Georgia Pike is a 4th year student at the University of Victoria, who is visually-impaired and says she is increasingly stopped in public and asked to prove that her guide dog, Grainger, is really a guide dog. Georgia has all of the proper documentation, but she says she’s asked for ID every day, sometimes multiple times a day. She tells Gregor Craigie why she’s tired of being asked, and what she would like to have done about it. 8:49

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10Nov

Family of VIU student who died urge anyone struggling to reach out

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Spencer Stone Shutes is being remembered by family as a bright and caring person.



Spencer Stone Shutes is being remembered by family as a bright and caring person.


FAMILY PHOTO / Times Colonist

The 21-year-old Vancouver Island University student who died after falling from the fifth and top floor of the school’s library on Monday is being remembered by family as a bright and caring person who was a whiz with computers.

Spencer Stone Shutes was studying computer science and had just completed the first year of his electrical apprenticeship at the Nanaimo university, said his 24-year-old brother, Brandon Stone.

“For 21 years, he was my best friend,” Stone said.

Shutes loved his family and his Russian blue cat, Simba.

Shutes’ nickname was “fact-man,” his brother said, because he retained an encyclopedic knowledge about so many topics.

Shutes devoured documentaries and loved watching the X Files and Top Gear. He graduated from Wellington Secondary School in Nanaimo in 2015 with top marks. Stone said any suggestion of skipping school was politely turned down by his younger brother.

Shutes, Stone and Stone’s girlfriend all worked for Shaw Cable.

“He was very good at that job and well-loved among his team,” Stone said.

Stone, a musician, sometimes played gigs at Longwood Brew Pub and one of his favourite photos of Shutes is from a night he watched the gig alongside their mother.

Shutes, wearing a button-up shirt and wire-frame glasses, is smiling and raising his glass. Stone said that’s how he’ll always remember his brother.

Shutes lived with his mother and supported her financially, as she is on permanent disability.

Stone has started a Go Fund Me donation page to help their mother financially. “He would have wanted her to be taken care of, that was always at the forefront of his mind,” Stone said.

Shutes was busy with work, school and looking after their mom, and there was no indication he was struggling, Stone said.

“I never thought that this would happen and having it happen first-hand shows me it’s so important for every person to know you do have people who care about you and you do have people who you can reach out to.

“If you’re feeling overwhelmed beyond belief and you feel like you have no options, just give yourself an hour, talk to someone on the phone. Because those moments can pass. Just seek out somebody before you do something that you can’t take back.”

The B.C. Coroners Service is investigating the death. No foul play is suspected.

Coroners Service spokesman Andy Watson could not confirm the cause of death, saying it’s early in the investigation. “We look to determine who died, when, where and by what means. We’re in the early stages of the investigation.”

A date has yet to be set for a funeral.

In a statement, Vancouver Island University thanked the school community “for coming together to support each other as we navigate through the impacts of the tragic loss that occurred on Monday.”

The school is providing counselling to anyone who witnessed the death or anyone who is struggling with the news.

Shutes’ family gave the university permission to identify him.

“Our heartfelt thoughts are with his family and friends and everyone who has been impacted,” the university said in a statement. “At times like this, it is important that we continue to come together with kindness and respect and provide support to each other, as we come to terms with what has happened. We are heartened that VIU and the broader community continues to support Spencer’s family and friends and each other in so many different and compassionate ways.”

kderosa@timescolonist.com

• The family’s donation page is at GoFundMe.com; search for Spencer Stone Shutes.

• Anyone who is struggling can access around-the-clock support through the Vancouver Island Crisis Line at 1-888-494-3888.


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10Nov

Family of VIU student who died urge anyone struggling to reach out

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Spencer Stone Shutes is being remembered by family as a bright and caring person.



Spencer Stone Shutes is being remembered by family as a bright and caring person.


FAMILY PHOTO / Times Colonist

The 21-year-old Vancouver Island University student who died after falling from the fifth and top floor of the school’s library on Monday is being remembered by family as a bright and caring person who was a whiz with computers.

Spencer Stone Shutes was studying computer science and had just completed the first year of his electrical apprenticeship at the Nanaimo university, said his 24-year-old brother, Brandon Stone.

“For 21 years, he was my best friend,” Stone said.

Shutes loved his family and his Russian blue cat, Simba.

Shutes’ nickname was “fact-man,” his brother said, because he retained an encyclopedic knowledge about so many topics.

Shutes devoured documentaries and loved watching the X Files and Top Gear. He graduated from Wellington Secondary School in Nanaimo in 2015 with top marks. Stone said any suggestion of skipping school was politely turned down by his younger brother.

Shutes, Stone and Stone’s girlfriend all worked for Shaw Cable.

“He was very good at that job and well-loved among his team,” Stone said.

Stone, a musician, sometimes played gigs at Longwood Brew Pub and one of his favourite photos of Shutes is from a night he watched the gig alongside their mother.

Shutes, wearing a button-up shirt and wire-frame glasses, is smiling and raising his glass. Stone said that’s how he’ll always remember his brother.

Shutes lived with his mother and supported her financially, as she is on permanent disability.

Stone has started a Go Fund Me donation page to help their mother financially. “He would have wanted her to be taken care of, that was always at the forefront of his mind,” Stone said.

Shutes was busy with work, school and looking after their mom, and there was no indication he was struggling, Stone said.

“I never thought that this would happen and having it happen first-hand shows me it’s so important for every person to know you do have people who care about you and you do have people who you can reach out to.

“If you’re feeling overwhelmed beyond belief and you feel like you have no options, just give yourself an hour, talk to someone on the phone. Because those moments can pass. Just seek out somebody before you do something that you can’t take back.”

The B.C. Coroners Service is investigating the death. No foul play is suspected.

Coroners Service spokesman Andy Watson could not confirm the cause of death, saying it’s early in the investigation. “We look to determine who died, when, where and by what means. We’re in the early stages of the investigation.”

A date has yet to be set for a funeral.

In a statement, Vancouver Island University thanked the school community “for coming together to support each other as we navigate through the impacts of the tragic loss that occurred on Monday.”

The school is providing counselling to anyone who witnessed the death or anyone who is struggling with the news.

Shutes’ family gave the university permission to identify him.

“Our heartfelt thoughts are with his family and friends and everyone who has been impacted,” the university said in a statement. “At times like this, it is important that we continue to come together with kindness and respect and provide support to each other, as we come to terms with what has happened. We are heartened that VIU and the broader community continues to support Spencer’s family and friends and each other in so many different and compassionate ways.”

kderosa@timescolonist.com

• The family’s donation page is at GoFundMe.com; search for Spencer Stone Shutes.

• Anyone who is struggling can access around-the-clock support through the Vancouver Island Crisis Line at 1-888-494-3888.


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2Nov

Defence for killer of Japanese student says he should be jailed for minimum 10 years

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A memorial for Japanese student Natsumi Kogawa outside a heritage mansion in downtown Vancouver in 2016.


PNG / PNG

A man found guilty by a jury of second-degree murder of a Japanese student in Vancouver should be jailed for the minimum 10 years for the crime, his lawyer argued in B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver on Friday.

The prosecutor is asking the court to sentence William Schneider to 17 years for the killing of Natsumi Kogawa before he can apply for parole.

After deliberating for several days, a jury last month found Schneider, 50, guilty of the September 2016 second-degree murder of Kogawa, 30.

Second-degree murder carries a mandatory sentence of life in prison with a period of parole ineligibility of between 10 and 25 years.

Sentencing is to be delivered on Friday afternoon.

Defence lawyer Joe Doyle said Schneider’s sentence should be mitigated by his expression of remorse. And he noted that Schneider did reveal where the body could be found.

And Doyle argued that although Schneider had a lengthy record of prior offences, he hasn’t been convicted of a violent offence since the 1990s.

“It’s a long time ago,” he said. “He didn’t cease committing offences but he did cease committing violent offences and that’s not always the case.”

Schneider read a brief apology in court to Kogawa’s mother, Emiko Kogawa. She had attended the trial but has since returned to Japan.

Earlier this week her victim impact statement was read into court, and in it she said since the murder she has not been able to feel any joy in life, keeps thinking about her daughter and cries every day.

“I am horrified that her life has been ended by such an unfortunate event.”

The mother said she was dismayed she had not heard an apology from Schneider or his family. “I cannot forgive them for their disrespectful behaviour.”

Schneider said in court “Your words bit right through me” and that he was sorry for her pain.

In his sentencing submissions, Crown counsel Geordie Proulx argued the circumstances were so aggravated and the risk of future dangerousness of Schneider so great, that the offender should get 17 years with no parole.

Proulx said there was a high degree of moral culpability because Schneider had attacked a defenceless and small woman.

“There must have been a period of minutes when Natsumi Kogawa was being put to death.”

Schneider met Kogawa, who came to Canada from Japan to study English, in August 2016, soon after he had returned from an unsuccessful trip to Japan to try to persuade his wife to return to Canada with their teenage son.

He had become enamoured with Kogawa and excited by the prospect of having a relationship with her, Proulx told B.C. Supreme Court Justice Laura Gerow.

Prior to the murder, they had met on two occasions, one of them apparently on a hike on the North Shore, the prosecutor said.

On the date of the offence, they met on a mall on West Hastings Street, with Kogawa purchasing several items, including a bottle of vodka.

CCTV video footage showed the two interacting amicably as they walked westbound on West Hastings towards Stanley Park.

Proulx said the evidence provided by the accused’s brother showed the purpose for the meeting was to go to Stanley Park to engage in consensual sex in a tent.

Kogawa had arranged to meet a friend later in the day to get a job application for a Japanese restaurant, so they set up the tent in a location other than Stanley Park, said Proulx.

The Crown’s theory is Schneider smothered Kogawa to death by placing his hand over her mouth and nose.

Later, Schneider acquired a large suitcase, placed the body in the suitcase and left the body on a property in the West End.

Proulx said the parole ineligibility should be high because of the future risk posed by Schneider, who has 48 prior criminal convictions.

Many of the convictions were for property offences, but there were a number of violent crimes, including an incident in which he choked a woman in her apartment in Edmonton, putting his hand over her mouth and nose.

He was also convicted of several assaults on police officers and the armed robberies of several Japanese business establishments.

Prior to final submissions, Schneider pleaded guilty to interfering with the victim’s dead body. Proulx argued that he should get four years in jail for that offence, to run concurrently with the murder sentence.

MORE LATER


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1Nov

Murderer of Japanese student should get 17 years with no parole: Crown

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A man who was convicted of murdering a Japanese student in Vancouver should spend 17 years behind bars before he can apply for parole, a prosecutor argued Thursday.

In October, following several days of deliberations, a B.C. Supreme Court jury found William Schneider, 50, guilty of the September 2016 second-degree murder of Natsumi Kogawa, 30.

Second-degree murder carries a mandatory sentence of life in prison with a period of parole ineligibility of between 10 and 25 years.

In sentencing submissions, Crown counsel Geordie Proulx argued that the circumstances were so aggravated and the risk of future dangerousness of Schneider so great, that the offender should get 17 years with no parole.

Proulx said there was a high degree of moral culpability because Schneider had attacked a defenceless and small woman.

“There must have been a period of minutes when Natsumi Kogawa was being put to death.”

He outlined the details of the offence, noting that Schneider and Kogawa, who came to Canada from Japan to study English, had met in mid- to late-August 2016.

At the time, Schneider had just returned from an unsuccessful trip to Japan to try and convince his wife to return to Canada with him and their son.

He had become enamoured with Kogawa and excited by the prospect of having a relationship with her, Proulx told B.C. Supreme Court Justice Laura Gerow.

Prior to the murder, they had met on two occasions, one of them apparently on a hike on the North Shore, the prosecutor said.

On the date of the offence, they met on a mall on West Hastings Street, with Kogawa purchasing several items, including a bottle of vodka.


CC TV footage of Japanese student Natsumi Kogawa on the day she disappeared.

RCMP /

PNG

CCTV video footage showed the two interacting amicably as they walked westbound on West Hastings towards Stanley Park.

Proulx said it appeared from the evidence provided by the accused’s brother that the purpose for the meeting was to go to Stanley Park to engage in some form of consensual sex in a tent that Schneider had recently acquired.

Kogawa had arranged to meet a man in Burnaby later in the day to get a job application for a Japanese restaurant.

Due to time constraints, a location other than Stanley Park was chosen to set up the tent, said Proulx.

The Crown’s theory is that when the victim was naked in the tent, Schneider smothered her to death by placing his hand over her mouth and nose.

Later, Schneider acquired a large suitcase, placed the body in the suitcase and left the body on a property in the West End.

Proulx said the parole ineligibility should be high because of the future risk posed by Schneider, who has 48 prior criminal convictions.


A 30-year-old Japanese student, Natsumi Kogawa, was found dead in Vancouver.

RCMP

Many of the convictions were for property offences, but there were a number of violent crimes, including an incident in which he choked a woman in her apartment in Edmonton, putting his hand over her mouth and nose.

He was also convicted of several assaults on police officers and the armed robberies of several Japanese business establishments.

Proulx read out an impact statement from the victim’s mother, Emiko Kogawa, who attended the trial but has returned home to Japan.

The mother said in her statement, which was translated from Japanese, that since the murder she has not been able to feel any joy in life, keeps thinking about her daughter and cries every day.

“I feel terribly sorry that she cannot do the many things that she wanted to do in her life. She went to Vancouver to study for her future. I am horrified that her life has been ended by such an unfortunate event.”

The mother said she wondered how Schneider felt when he was killing her daughter and added she cannot believe she had not heard any apology from the offender or his family. “I cannot forgive them for their disrespectful behaviour.”

Jay Vergara, a boyfriend of Natsumi, also provided a victim-impact statement in which he said he had been diagnosed with “reactive” depression following the murder.

“Losing my girlfriend has been incredibly detrimental to my emotional well-being. I feel as if I had my future taken away because of her murder.”

Prior to final submissions, Schneider pleaded guilty to interfering with the victim’s dead body. Proulx argued that he should get four years in jail for that offence, to run concurrently with the murder sentence.

Joe Doyle, a lawyer for Schneider, said there was evidence that his client had expressed remorse and challenged the Crown’s assertion that the murder took several minutes.

The defence lawyer argued that it was not a case where there should be an increase beyond the minimum of 10 years of parole eligibility.

He said that despite his client’s lengthy record, he had committed no violent crimes from 1998 until the murder.

“There was a substantial gap in his violent offences, and I think that’s worthy of note.”

The judge said she expected to impose sentence later in November or early December.

[email protected]


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27Sep

Man accused of killing Japanese student told brother where body was, court hears

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Weeks before being charged with the murder of a Japanese student he was dating, William Schneider was “sad” and “upset” over the inability to have a relationship with his teenage son in Japan, his murder trial heard Thursday.

The revelations were part of the testimony from his older brother, Warren Schneider of Kelowna, the Crown’s main witness in the second-degree murder trial.

William Schneider also faces a charge of committing an indignity against a human body. He has pleaded not guilty in B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver. Thursday was the fourth day of the trial before judge and jury.

Warren told court that William had travelled to Japan in June and July of 2016 to visit his teenage son, Ricky, and was upset that his estranged wife wouldn’t return to Canada with their son or let the boy take his surname.

“The vacation didn’t go the way (William) wanted,” said Warren. “He was sad and lost and didn’t succeed in keeping a steady relationship with his son.”

A week after returning from Japan, William moved in to a men’s hostel, where he lived for the next six weeks, during which time he met Natsumi Kogawa.

Her body was found in a suitcase in Vancouver’s West End on Sept. 28, 2016, about two weeks after friends reported her missing.


The body of Natsumi Kogawa, a 30-year-old Japanese student, was found Sept. 28 at the abandoned Gabriola mansion on Davie Street.

Warren Schneider, according to prosecutor Geordie Proulx’s opening statement on the first day of the trial, overheard his younger brother telling his estranged wife in Japan on the phone that “I did it” or “I killed her.”

But the eight-woman, four-man jury on Thursday didn’t hear Warren testify about that phone call.

He did testify how he learned William was being sought as a suspect in the case of a missing Japanese student in Vancouver.

After police posted a photo from CCTV footage showing Kogawa and William walking together, Warren’s daughter in Kelowna contacted Warren to ask if it was Willie, as he is called, in the photo.


William Victor Schneider, is pictured here alongside Japanese student Natsumi Kogawa.

RCMP

It was a week after William had shown up in Kelowna, telling Warren and their half-brother Kevin that “he had done something bad” before leaving them shortly after arriving.

“What did you conclude?” Proulx asked Warren after he saw the photo.

“The worst,” replied Warren.

He called William in Vernon, at their father’s home, and told him about the photo, and William hung up without a word, he testified.

He drove to Vernon that night and then walked with William to buy beer.

During the walk, William said “that it’s true,” said Warren, adding he was “referring to (an) article on the Internet (about) the missing Japanese student. He brought it up. I didn’t pry.”

Related

The brothers that evening drank together in the park and agreed to talk more the next day, Warren said.

The next morning, William bought some heroin with the intention of committing suicide by overdosing, Warren testified. He said William told him where to find Kogawa’s body in Vancouver so Warren could tell police after he was dead.

Warren said he took several photos of them and then called 911 to report a heroin overdose at the park.

But William didn’t overdose. “(William) realized he got ripped off. (The heroin) wasn’t strong enough and he didn’t die,” Warren said.

Later, the men’s half-sister called Warren, who told her that he was with Willie “and we were hugging goodbye because (William) had planned on getting some more heroin” to commit suicide.

The sister picked up Warren and drove him to the police station.

[email protected]


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