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Posts Tagged "Suspect"

12Sep

Metro Vancouver Transit Police looking for suspect in 2 violent robberies | CBC News

by admin

Metro Vancouver Transit Police are searching for a suspect who allegedly committed two robberies in August, choking each victim until they became unconscious.

In both incidents, the suspect approached and began conversations with the victims before placing them in a headlock and robbing them, according to a Transit Police news release.

Early on the morning of Aug. 18, police say the suspect approached a 45-year-old man riding a bus headed toward the Marine Drive Canada Line station. According to police, he befriended the man, followed him off the bus, asked him for a cigarette and when the victim refused, tackled him and placed him in a headlock until he lost consciousness.

Upon regaining consciousness, the suspect asked the victim to buy him a drink at the Marine Drive Canada Line Station store, but when the victim entered the store,  police say, the man stole his phone and fled on the train.

Police say the second robbery occurred late on Aug. 20 when the suspect started a conversation with a 26-year-old man at the Stadium SkyTrain Station.

The suspect grabbed the man when he tried to leave, placed him in a headlock and choked him until he was unconscious.

Watch: Robbery suspect caught on video before his alleged crimes

CCTV at Vancouver’s Stadium SkyTrain Station recorded a suspect before he is alleged to have taken part in a violent robbery. Transit Police say the man is responsible for two thefts in which he put his victims in a headlock, choking them until they were unconscious. 0:17

The victim’s wallet was stolen and his credit card used to make a $400 purchase at a convenience store.

The suspect is described as a Caucasian or Indigenous man in his late 30s, between five feet eight inches and five feet 10 inches with a stocky build and short brown hair.

Transit police say the level of violence used by the suspect is concerning and ask anyone with information about his identity to contact them at 604-516-7419 or by text message at 87-77-77.

23Aug

City of suspect sidewalks: In Vancouver, danger is underfoot

by admin

Emrys Horton’s first instinct when he saw flames engulf a boat in a Yaletown marina was to run to help. He wasn’t thinking of the ground beneath him. But in his sprint to the boat, Horton rolled his ankle on a large lump in the sidewalk.

Horton, manager of the nearby Provence Marinaside restaurant, had reacted to the billowing smoke from flames that had engulfed a 10-metre pleasure vessel on Oct. 12, 2017. The blaze took eight fire trucks and a fireboat to put out.

No one was hurt in the fire — but Horton suffered more than just a sprain. He twisted his ankle so much that he tore the tendon off his bone, taking a piece of bone with it, in what’s known as an avulsion fracture.

“My ankle will literally never be the same as it was,” said Horton, 43.

He reported the sidewalk hazard, but didn’t report his injury. It never occurred to him.

“I suspect I probably should have, but I didn’t at the time,” Horton said about the idea of taking his case to a personal-injury lawyer. “I probably won’t now.”

Everyone walks on them. But not many people pay much attention to the city’s sidewalks, even though they are among the most ubiquitous pieces of city infrastructure.

Horton is one of many people to have injured themselves by tripping or falling because of sidewalk disrepair in the City of Vancouver. Their experiences highlight a public lack of knowledge about recourse when it comes to injuries caused by sidewalks. It also highlights what some advocates say is infrastructure sorely neglected by the city and a maintenance system that may not be adequately serving the public’s needs.


Emrys Horton in areas where sidewalks are broken or collapsing on Marinaside Crescent in Vancouver.

NICK PROCAYLO /

PNG

The sidewalk network

The City of Vancouver has about 2,200 kilometres of sidewalks. Put end to end, they would stretch from the city to Anchorage, Alaska. Everyone uses sidewalks at some point, whether walking is their primary mode of transportation or not: Drivers walk on them to and from their cars, transit riders travel on them to their stops and stations, cyclists lock up their bikes and walk to their destination on them.

City reports show that the city’s sidewalks are heavily used — and that getting even more people to use them is a priority. The City of Vancouver’s 2017 Walking and Cycling report card found that 25 per cent of all trips in Vancouver are completed by walking — meaning that it’s the dominant mode of transportation for a person’s trip. Meanwhile, the city’s Transportation 2040 Plan says that walking should be the “top transportation priority” for future growth.

The city’s 2019 budget includes $1.75 million for the construction of new sidewalks and $798,000 to rehabilitate roughly one kilometre of existing sidewalks. According to the budget, priority for sidewalk rehabilitation is given to areas that get a lot of pedestrian activity, such as commercial areas and transit routes. In addition, an uncertain amount of sidewalk is rebuilt each year as part of broader road-replacement work.

By comparison, the budget allocates $9 million for bikeways and greenways, and $8 million to repave major arterial streets.

Some feel that sidewalks are still an afterthought.

“I think it’s an overlooked form of infrastructure,” said Andy Yan, a director with the City Program at Simon Fraser University. “I mean, one hopes it’s seen as a form of central infrastructure.”

Yan defines sidewalks as formalized pathways that connect a city and facilitate movement across it by foot. But he says the pedestrian experience can quickly turn bad and even lead to injury and distress, when sidewalks fall into disrepair.

‘I have started walking a different route home’

A fall on an uneven sidewalk one dark and wet November night in 2018 left teacher Ellen Michelle with pain all over her body and so much anxiety that she permanently changed the route for her daily walk home from work.

Michelle, 26, was walking home along Cambie Street from the King Edward Canada Line station after a day of teaching when she fell.

“There was one part of the sidewalk that was raised, and it was right beside a tree,” Michelle said.

A tree root had pushed the sidewalk section up on the east side of Cambie Street between 26th and 27th avenues. The raised sidewalk caught Michelle unawares and sent her sprawling to the ground.

“I ended up flying forward a few feet, at least. Dropped everything I was holding, including a bag of student midterms that I was taking home to grade,” Michelle said.

Michelle ended up with a bloody, fat lip for three days and soreness in her entire body that lasted a week.

“It was very difficult to move the next day,” she said.

Injuries sustained from disrepaired or broken sidewalks can leave lasting marks. The most common injuries are broken ankles. The odds of injury increase during the rainy months of winter.

Michelle’s experience highlights how sidewalk accidents have more than physical consequences.

“One thing I’ll say is that since that fall, I have started walking a different route home to avoid that spot,” Michelle said.

Michelle wishes the city would “just fix the sidewalk when roots grow out of them,” so no one else has to sustain injuries, trivial or severe.


Pedestrians in areas where sidewalks are broken or collapsing on Marinaside Crescent in Vancouver.

NICK PROCAYLO /

PNG

Sidewalk monitoring

Tree roots pushing up from underneath are a common cause of damage to Vancouver’s sidewalks. Shifting ground also breaks sidewalks: As the ground moves, the sidewalk is not able to adjust.

In order to monitor the disrepair, Vancouver has a sidewalk maintenance policy that requires a team of city workers to visually examine every sidewalk in the city annually for such defects. According to the city, the inspection team of six or seven people examines the city’s sidewalks from about November or December to July or August and identifies any cracks or bumps that could present hazards. The policy states that any hazards that measure over one inch are scheduled to be repaired within seven days.

The city also relies on residents to report damaged sidewalks. But not many people know this.

Michelle, for example, didn’t report the sidewalk problem that caused her to fall. She says she was unaware she could.

It’s one reason why it’s difficult to determine the extent of the city’s liability for sidewalk injuries.

Cities can be held liable for injury if they have not met a minimum duty of care to ensure that sidewalks are safe for people to use.

This falls under the concept of “reasonableness,” according to personal-injury lawyer Mark Carter. That means that as long as the city has made an effort to maintain the sidewalk, it has fulfilled its duty of care.

Vancouver works to meet its duty of care through its annual inspection program. In addition, the city relies on people to report sidewalks in poor condition through the VanConnect app, the city website or calls to 311.

Yan said that such reporting methods give the public the opportunity to hold their city accountable in maintaining the standard they have set when it comes to sidewalks.

VanConnect appears to have led to an increase in the number of complaints. When the app went online in the middle of 2015, the number of sidewalk complaints from people increased more than 40 per cent, from an average of 1,250 to 1,760 a year.

Yan also said that just checking a sidewalk complaint isn’t enough. Action, in many cases, must happen as well.

“You can imagine that if something happened and it’s a part of a sidewalk that’s been complained about several times, it does present the city with a certain liability,” he said.

Is it enough?

This raises the question of whether the current system is good enough for those who live and work in the city.

Carter said the answer to this depends on three things:

• Whether a city policy exists.

• Whether that policy can be considered “reasonable.”

• Whether the policy was followed.

Carter says Vancouver is not meeting a “reasonable” standard.

“Let’s say they had a program, and they would check the sidewalks once per year to see if they’re safe or not. Well, that’s not very reasonable. They would have to check it several times a year,” Carter said.

Yan isn’t quite so critical of the city’s sidewalk maintenance standards, saying they stand up well compared to other cities.

He said the one-inch minimum for defects warranting repair, for example, may seem like a poor standard, but he argued it’s reasonable given the amount the ground can shift or the fact that so many sidewalks run beside trees.

However, he says the city needs to better define its maintenance policy.

“If you do see a problem on your sidewalk, how do you report it in? What are the protocols for maintenance that the city has towards maintaining sidewalks, much less maintaining public infrastructure?” Yan said.

“I mean, we arguably have minimum standards towards maintaining our roads; one might expect that one has standards towards maintaining our sidewalks.”

Ultimately, it means that the city’s duty of care is arguably open to question — and that could invite legal action.

However, Carter said that while lawsuits against the city do happen, they are rare. A freedom of information request revealed that between Jan. 1, 2014, and Jan. 31, 2019, there had been 28 “civil lawsuits brought against the city as a result of injuries incurred on city sidewalks. A total of $117,000 was paid out by the city to settle these lawsuits, an average of less than $24,000 a year.

Carter said many people don’t file civil lawsuits, and those who do will settle because of the cost of seeing it go to trial.

However, he said many people injured in sidewalk falls do not even think about a lawsuit, and have no idea where to turn to or what recourse they have available to them.

‘I didn’t hear back’

Reporting sidewalk issues to the city isn’t a guarantee of their repair, say people who have tried to navigate the system.

Erik Hearn broke his collarbone when he tripped on a West End sidewalk during his regular 10-kilometre morning walk.

Hearn was aware he could report the damaged sidewalk to the city, and took action.

“I did take a picture and I did send it to the website,” Hearn said. “But I didn’t hear back.”

Hearn said the city “planted trees that are huge trees and with that comes huge roots. And the roots are now the ones that are causing the problem with the sidewalks, curling up and making the sidewalks uneven.”

Hearn said he is worried that his neighbours may have similar accidents and injure themselves as he did.

“The city has neglected totally to repair sidewalks here, which is probably an area of the city where they should pay specific attention to that because a big portion of the residents in this area are seniors,” he said.

Since his own fall in Yaletown, Horton has reported several other damaged sidewalks. He, too, questions the city’s response to reports of disrepair.

“Some of the things that I’ve personally reported multiple times have not been fixed within months or years,” Horton said.

While on the job at Provence Marinaside, Horton said he has repeatedly seen unsuspecting pedestrians trip and get hurt.

“I’ve had customers fall on their face,” Horton said. “A guy just went down face-first on the ground right outside because he tripped on the edge of one of the cobblestone bricks there that’s starting to lift. Broke his nose, lost consciousness.”

Accessibility challenges

Even when reported sidewalks are fixed by the city, some say the repairs aren’t adequate.

Horton said the fall that severely injured his ankle was caused by a piece of sidewalk that had been previously repaired by the city with asphalt, a common fix. He said city crews covered the damaged area with asphalt, which then chipped away over time.

Accessibility advocates like Gabrielle Peters say that such repairs aren’t good enough — and that’s compounding problems for those with mobility issues.

Peters, who has served on the city’s Active Transportation Policy Council, says her advocacy began when she began taking photos of sidewalks and posting them online.

“The city will instruct people to contact 311. Every block, I could be calling 311,” said Peters.

She refers to some of the repairs she’s seen as “almost a work of art.”

“Literally, they poured asphalt on top of pouring asphalt on top of pouring asphalt. And you honestly have this little sort of pyramid, built in the middle of the sidewalk.”

For those with mobility issues, such uneven sidewalks pose an obstacle in reaching public transit or personal vehicles.


Sandy James with the advocacy group Walk Metro Vancouver on W10th Ave where cars, cyclists and pedestrians share space.

Gerry Kahrmann /

PNG

‘Pedestrians are disenfranchised’

For Sandy James, improving the state of sidewalks in the city is about more than repairing cracks and bumps. It’s about making journeys better for the most vulnerable road users, like people with mobility challenges and those who use wheelchairs or push strollers.

James worked at city hall for nearly three decades, including 22 years as a city planner. As a greenway planner, she designed streets to give walking and biking priority over car traffic.

She left the city in 2011, and is now the managing director of Walk Metro Vancouver, a group that advocates improved walkability. She’s critical of the city’s sidewalk policy.

“The challenge here is that pedestrians are disenfranchised,” she said. “It’s just not been on the radar.”

To improve the city’s walkability, James said streets need to be “clean, curious and comfortable,” meaning wider sidewalks, curb ramps for those using wheelchairs, streets clear of gum and other garbage and installation of plants or other street decorations to enhance the overall experience.

James also highlighted the problem of trees. In a city that loves its leafy boulevards, there’s a struggle between maintaining both trees and sidewalks. James said ash trees on Commercial Drive, for example, destroyed the sidewalk. New sidewalks were installed, but that didn’t address the underlying problem.

“Trees sometimes have a shelf life,” James said, adding that’s something she thinks many in Vancouver don’t understand.

Taryn Scollard, the city’s director of streets, said the city’s engineering department works with the park board to select trees that are less disruptive to sidewalks, and have developed root barriers to try to guide root growth downward instead of popping up and leading to sidewalk hazards.

The city has also installed rubber sidewalks made of recycled tires in a couple of locations to see if they are more durable than pavement.

“We’re always looking for new ideas to meet everybody’s needs,” Scollard said.


Construction on Slocan Street. Vancouver tries to extend its sidewalk budget by rebuilding sidewalks at the same time roads are being rebuilt.

NICK PROCAYLO /

PNG

‘A high priority for the city’

Scollard said while the city could always use more money to address concerns, she believes Vancouver’s sidewalks are in much better condition than those in other Canadian cities. She added that the city makes the most of their budget by combining sidewalk maintenance projects with other construction work whenever possible.

“All areas of pedestrian movement are a high priority for the city,” Scollard said.

She said the city has made a number of changes to sidewalk standards in recent years, including making them wider, putting sidewalks farther away from roads when possible, and installing “pedestrian bulges” at the corners of sidewalks to reduce the amount of time pedestrians spend on the road while crossing the street.

Nathan Durec, Roxanne Egan-Elliott and Mandy Moraes are among this year’s recipients of the Langara College Read-Mercer Journalism Fellowship. This feature was produced through the fellowship.


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31Jul

Surrey Mounties seeking suspect in attempted Newton-area robbery

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Mounties in Surrey are searching for the suspect in an armed robbery that occurred Tuesday night in the Newton area.


Jason Payne / PNG

Mounties in Surrey are searching for the suspect in an armed robbery that occurred Tuesday night in the Newton area.

According to Surrey RCMP, police were alerted just after 10 p.m. to an attempted robbery in progress outside a residence in the 6800 block of 148 Street.

According to reports, a young man “was in possession of a possible firearm, and demanding personal items from an adult victim,” police said in a news release.

The suspect, described as a thin, white male between 20-25 years old with brown hair, fled the scene prior to Mounties’ arrival.

Police may have arrived at the scene sooner but in responding to the incident, two police vehicles were involved in a collision at the intersection of 72 Avenue and 140 Street. The drivers of both vehicles were taken to hospital and treated for minor injuries.

Surrey RCMP are investigating the robbery as well as the ensuing crash, and are appealing to the public for witnesses who may have useful information or video footage.

Anyone with further information about the attempted robbery, or that may have CCTV footage of the suspect, is asked to contact the Surrey RCMP.

25Jul

Kelowna RCMP release video of arson suspect | CBC News

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Kelowna RCMP have released a video of an arson suspect who they say torched a car last month.

In a release, police say they were called to assist the Kelowna Fire Department with a car on fire off Pearson Road in the early hours of  June 24, 2019. By the time police arrived, a red Mini Cooper was in flames.

In seized CCTV video, a suspect can be  seen lighting an object on fire, which is then tossed inside the parked Mini Cooper, through its open passenger side door, police said.

The suspect is seen fleeing on foot. 

“Someone in the community must recognize our arson suspect,” Kelowna RCMP Corporal Jesse O’Donaghey said in the statement.

“The suspect, who may be recognizable to someone due to his clothing or stature, seems to carry himself in a unique and distinctive manner as he jogs away from the scene.”

Police said the unidentified suspect is described as heavy set and approximately 6 feet tall. He was seen wearing a light-coloured hoodie, light coloured pants and a pair of dark running shoes at the time of the incident 

Kelowna RCMP ask anyone anyone with any additional information to contact them at 250-762-3300 or to remain completely anonymous by calling Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or by leaving a tip online at www.crimestoppers.net


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17Apr

B.C. murder suspect Brandon Teixeira could be in Alberta: IHIT

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CTV News Vancouver


Published Wednesday, April 17, 2019 12:03PM PDT


Last Updated Wednesday, April 17, 2019 12:24PM PDT

Homicide detectives from B.C. are renewing their calls for Albertans to be on the lookout for missing murder suspect Brandon Nathan Teixeira.

Teixeira is charged with first-degree murder in the October 2017 death of Nicholas Khabra in Surrey.

“We are asking all Albertans to be on the lookout for this man: Brandon Nathan Teixeira,” Cpl. Frank Jang of the Integrated Homicide Investigation Team told reporters in Edmonton, adding that the 27-year-old is known to have associates in Alberta and could be in the province himself.

This isn’t the first time IHIT has focused its efforts in Alberta.

The force announced back in September that the fugitive could be in Calgary or Alberta.

Mounties also believe Texeira may be using food delivery service SkipTheDishes.

The company has issued a warning people to be on the lookout for the fugitive, who may be armed and dangerous.

The last confirmed sighting of Teixeira was in early September when security camera footage showed him making a purchase at a liquor store in Langley.

Jang encouraged the public to review the images from that sighting, but also warned them to keep in mind the Teixeira may have radically altered his appearance by changing his hair and facial hair using accessories such as glasses.

The accused is described as white, 5’10” tall, 160 pounds with brown eyes and brown hair. He has a snake tattoo on the left side of his chest and a sleeve tattoo on his left arm.

Anyone who thinks they may have seen Teixeira is asked to contact IHIT at 1-877-551-4448 or Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-222-8477.

There is a $55,000 for information that leads to his arrest.


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17Apr

Murder suspect may be using SkipTheDishes, company warns drivers

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CTV News Vancouver


Published Wednesday, April 17, 2019 12:03PM PDT


Last Updated Wednesday, April 17, 2019 1:51PM PDT

SkipTheDishes is warning its drivers that a missing B.C. murder suspect may be using the food delivery service.

Brandon Nathan Teixeira is charged with first-degree murder in the October 2017 death of Nicholas Khabra in Surrey.

“The RCMP suspect that an individual by the name of Brandon Teixeira may be armed and dangerous,” SkipTheDishes said in a statement.

“The RCMP also believe that the individual may order from food delivery services, including in the Lower Mainland and Fraser Valley areas of British Columbia and in Calgary, Edmonton, Grande Prairie, and Grimshaw areas of Alberta. Be advised that Teixeira may place an order under another name.”

Anyone who sees the fugutive should call 911 immediately, the company said.

The warning came the same day homicide detectives from B.C. renewed their calls for Albertans to be on the lookout for Teixeira.

“We are asking all Albertans to be on the lookout for this man: Brandon Nathan Teixeira,” Cpl. Frank Jang of the Integrated Homicide Investigation Team told reporters in Edmonton, adding that the 27-year-old is known to have associates in Alberta and could be in the province himself.

This isn’t the first time IHIT has focused its efforts in Alberta.

The force announced back in September that the fugitive could be in Calgary or Alberta.

The last confirmed sighting of Teixeira was in early September when security camera footage showed him making a purchase at a liquor store in Langley.

Jang encouraged the public to review the images from that sighting, but also warned them to keep in mind the Teixeira may have radically altered his appearance by changing his hair and facial hair using accessories such as glasses.

The accused is described as white, 5’10” tall, 160 pounds with brown eyes and brown hair. He has a snake tattoo on the left side of his chest and a sleeve tattoo on his left arm.

Anyone who thinks they may have seen Teixeira is asked to contact IHIT at 1-877-551-4448 or Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-222-8477.

There is a $55,000 for information that leads to his arrest.


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9Mar

North Vancouver police release sketch of suspect in alleged sexual assault

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Police in North Vancouver are asking for help in identifying a man in an alleged sexual assault.

North Vancouver RCMP are investigating after a woman reported that on Feb. 27 she was assaulted after letting a man inside her home to use the washroom.

Police say the home is in the Upper Capilano area of North Vancouver.

On Saturday, police released a sketch of the suspect in the case and said investigators don’t believe the public is at risk.

Police also offered a warning with the release to remind people not to allow strangers into their homes.

Officers are asking anyone who can identify the person in the sketch to contact Cst. Jeewan Bassi at 604-985-1311.




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24Jan

Suspect followed woman, took photos in casino bathroom: RCMP

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Mounties are asking the public to help identify a suspect who is alleged to have followed a woman then took photos of her while she used a bathroom stall.

In a statement issued nearly two months after the incident was reported, Richmond Mounties said a woman had been followed from a Canada Line station to the River Rock Casino.

It was reported that the man followed her into the casino washroom in the early morning hours of Dec. 1, then used a cellphone to take photos while she was inside a stall.

The suspect fled when confronted, and was last seen heading toward Bridgeport Station, police said.

After following up on available leads, Mounties released a photo of a suspect Thursday.

“We are hoping that the security image of the suspect may prompt information from the public and possibly bring to light other unreported cases,” Cpl. Dennis Hwang said in a statement.

The suspect has been described as approximately 25 years old and possibly Indigenous. He is about 5’8″ with a slim build, and was wearing a black jacket and dark coloured pants at the time.

Anyone with any information is asked to contact the RCMP at 604-278-1212, quoting the file number 2018-34811.


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18Jan

Warrant issued for suspect in theft of ‘priceless’ guitars from 54-40

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An arrest warrant has been issued for a man suspected in the theft of seven “priceless” guitars from local rock band 54-40, police say.

Documents filed in court by New Westminster police say Yannick Lepage, 39, was the tenant of the Surrey storage locker where five of the seven guitars were found last fall. 

Lepage can also be seen on surveillance footage carting what looks like guitar cases, the documents say.

“We’ve been to a number of addresses looking for him,” Staff-Sgt. Stuart Jette told CTV News. “As recently as last week we had someone attend a residence in the Fraser Valley but (we) have been unsuccessful so far trying to find him. We’re still looking.” 

It’s not the first time Lepage has been publicly called out by police – in December, he appeared on the Surrey RCMP’s “naughty list.”

The guitars were stolen from the back of a truck outside the Queen’s Park Care Centre On Oct. 5, before 54-40 was slated to do back-to-back shows.

Guitarist Dave Genn called one the “fire breathing dragon”, and another “irreplaceable” at the time. The band offered a $5,000 reward for any information to find them.

The next day, according to the documents, the New Westminster Police Department got a tip pointing them to a self-storage facility on 104 Avenue in Surrey.

“I viewed the CCTV and observed multiple people rolling in 5 large guitar cases…some of them matched the description,” wrote NWPD Const. Eric Blower in the document.

Police gained access to the locker, where they found five of the seven guitars.

The band was relieved – and said they’d keep playing with them despite the risk.

“These instruments were made to be played, as opposed to locked away in a safe somewhere,” said Genn at the time.

The two guitars that are still out there are a Gibson Dove Acoustic and a Gibson SJ200 Acoustic.

Even as New Westminster police were hunting for Lepage, Surrey RCMP were looking for him for two alleged breaches of probation and an accusation of driving while prohibited. That led to his inclusion on its 10-person “naughty list.” 

Lepage has a number of convictions involving possession of stolen property, mischief and theft in 19 criminal files going back to 1998, according to records.

On his Facebook page, Lepage appears to acknowledge some of his time served: in one post, he writes, “16 days left of house arrest look out LOL.”

CTV News reached out to Lepage but didn’t hear back from him. 


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10Dec

Suspect found dead days after aunt raised suicide concerns, inquest hears

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CTV Vancouver


Published Monday, December 10, 2018 12:27PM PST


Last Updated Monday, December 10, 2018 4:37PM PST

A coroner’s inquest began Monday into the death of David Singh Tucker, a sexual assault suspect whose body was discovered in a Surrey, B.C. pretrial facility two years ago.

Tucker, 28, was one of two men being held in custody following a disturbing attack at the University of British Columbia campus in May 2016, and was facing charges of sexual assault, unlawful confinement, robbery and disguising his face with the intent to commit a crime.

The suspect was being kept in a segregation unit when staff found him dead on July 25 of that year.

The inquest into his death began with testimony from his aunt, Susan Brennan, who read a statement from Tucker’s mother describing him as a troubled person who was diagnosed with behavioural disorders as a young boy.

Brennan told the jury her nephew had expressed a desire to turn his life around, and an interest in financial planning. She said he told her over the phone that he “was disgusted with himself” after his arrest.

“He felt like a monster,” she said.

Brennan also testified that Tucker shared plans to intentionally overdose on hoarded methadone while in custody, and she pleaded with officials at the Surrey Pretrial Services Centre to keep a close watch over him on July 20 – a few days before he was found dead.

According to the BC Coroners Service, Tucker was last seen alive when he was given his dinner around 4 p.m. on July 24. Officers found him unresponsive during a check the next morning.

One of the guards from the Surrey pretrial facility told the inquest Tucker was not on suicide watch at hte time, and that it was hard to see into his cell because the window on the door and the security camera lens were both scratched.

The jury also heard testimony from staff about how some inmates would pretend to drink their methadone by hiding gauze in their mouth to soak up the drug, which would then be sold to other inmates.

Tucker’s cause of death has never been publicly released. The inquest is expected to hear from a toxicologist and a pathologist on Tuesday.

The inquest will examine the facts surrounding Tucker’s death, but can’t make any finding of legal responsibility. The jury can make recommendations aimed at preventing similar deaths in the future.

With files from CTV Vancouver’s Nafeesa Karim  


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